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General Zod
05-08-2009, 10:19 AM
Hello everyone, I have a question. I'm playing a flea soprano right now. Coming from the world of standard guitar I'm really missing that low string.
I want to string my uke with a low G set and understand that most have the low G wound (not good with plastic frets).

I was wondering at what loss would I be at if I moved the existing set down and made what was the high G now be the E.
So now the C string is the low G, the E is now the C? Anyone tried that before?

Keonikapila
05-08-2009, 12:02 PM
You could try it, but the strings (especially the new Low G) would be pretty loose and likely to cause a lot of buzzing.

A better bet would be to pick up a set of Worth Low-G strings (Worth sets don't have wound strings)...Personally, I find the Worth Low G's too loose for my taste, but the tension's still going to be a lot better than a C string tuned down to G.

General Zod
05-08-2009, 12:18 PM
Thank you for the tip. I was just checking out Worth's low G set and the gauges are not much off from a standard set. They look like they are doing what I was saying above. Maybe that was why you felt they were loose?

Worth Low G set: .0205"(. 52mm), .0260"(.66mm), .0291"(.74mm) .0358"(.91mm)

Brad Bordessa
05-08-2009, 12:23 PM
A better bet would be to pick up a set of Worth Low-G strings (Worth sets don't have wound strings)...Personally, I find the Worth Low G's too loose for my taste, but the tension's still going to be a lot better than a C string tuned down to G.

What gauge low g do you have? I have the fattest one and it is plenty tight.

+1 on the Worths. The unwound low g is really nice. And like you said, the wound string would probably eat the fretboard for lunch. I think that they sound much better than anything else and will probably give your Flea a boost. They really are the bomb IMO.

[edit:] I just saw your new post. For a soprano you will want the 46in length. The heavier low G that I have is .0433.

General Zod
05-08-2009, 12:39 PM
What gauge low g do you have? I have the fattest one and it is plenty tight.

+1 on the Worths. The unwound low g is really nice. And like you said, the wound string would probably eat the fretboard for lunch. I think that they sound much better than anything else and will probably give your Flea a boost. They really are the bomb IMO.

[edit:] I just saw your new post. For a soprano you will want the 46in length. The heavier low G that I have is .0433.

I'm on it. I really need to do it. I've been banging away on this for a few months and I sometimes go to that G expecting a low note and it drives me nuts.

I'll need to shave the bridge a little to get a thicker gauge string in there. The nut might be big enough, I'll have to see. I'm going to leave these Hilo's on here for a little bit longer and switch them up just to get a little more life out of them. Thanks for all your help guys.

Bluke
05-08-2009, 03:32 PM
http://ukuleleunderground.com/forum/showthread.php?t=13132

Keonikapila
05-08-2009, 05:34 PM
What gauge low g do you have? I have the fattest one and it is plenty tight.


I was talking about the regular tension clears and browns in general. I had intonation issues with the extra tension Worth Low G's.

Personally, I prefer wire-wounds for my Low G string and usually pair them with Worth Brown Strongs on the C,E,A.

General Zod
05-08-2009, 08:15 PM
Makes me wonder if a flat wound might be a good idea? They are really easy on frets and bassists prefer them on fretless basses to preserve the basses fretboard.
I wonder how one of those would do on these fluke plastic fretboards? Any ideas on that one?

Lori
05-09-2009, 06:28 AM
Makes me wonder if a flat wound might be a good idea? They are really easy on frets and bassists prefer them on fretless basses to preserve the basses fretboard.
I wonder how one of those would do on these fluke plastic fretboards? Any ideas on that one?
I don't know what the "flat wound" strings are like but...
I think the plastic fretboards on Fleas and Flukes are not recommended for wound strings. That's why they offer a rosewood fretboard too. I have heard that you can get an upgrade from plastic to rosewood from the manufacturer. I don't have one, but I have seen this issue on one of the UU forum threads.

–Lori

General Zod
05-09-2009, 07:53 AM
I don't know what the "flat wound" strings are like but...
I think the plastic fretboards on Fleas and Flukes are not recommended for wound strings. That's why they offer a rosewood fretboard too. I have heard that you can get an upgrade from plastic to rosewood from the manufacturer. I don't have one, but I have seen this issue on one of the UU forum threads.

–Lori

Flats are really easy on fretboards. Sound wise compared to a wound they are more mellow like a nylon but I think it it might be too bright in a set of nylons do to the steel core. I have an extra flat from a used set in a .038 guage that I might throw on there just to see.

I might just do that upgrade down the road. Or even see if I could pull it off on my own as a project?

General Zod
05-10-2009, 11:50 AM
The flat works but it's a temporary thing. It's a little too "thuddy" compared to the other nylon strings. It's tension might be a little much for other ukes (fluke's have a solid maple neck, same wood they make bowling pins out of). I'm definitely going to pick up a set of Worth's in a few days.
I do love the low G over a high. Coming from guitar you can play regular chords and scale runs as if playing a 6 string guitar was capo'd on 4th fret without any real adjustment.
That's a big plus for me. I've played guitar for over 20 years so it's great being able to pick this up and be right up to speed quick. :shaka: