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Jerryc41
03-08-2018, 03:38 AM
I'm converting an Enya tenor into a resonator, and I'm up to the point where I'm attaching the cover. The cover came from Bytown Ukes, and it has holes to attach the strings, holding them in place with knots. I don't like the idea of the strings being pulled against the edge of the metal. One possibility would be to attach a piece of wood to the cover and drill holes in that for the strings. Gold Tone uses that method. I'd have to be careful about the thickness of the wood. Otherwise, the strings would be too high to touch the saddle. Any ideas?

https://www.bytowninstruments.com/products/resonator-cover-plate

Gold Tone
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/folk-traditional-instruments/gold-tone-resouke-resonator-ukulele

mzuch
03-08-2018, 04:23 AM
I've been down that road. Do not attach the strings directly to the cover as designed. They will break even if you attempt to remove the burrs from the string holes. Instead, make a simple wooden tie block that is bolted through new holes in the cover (don't use the existing string holes for the bolts). Radius the bottom of the tie block so it fits snugly against the cover, then cut notches so you can feed the strings from the saddle under the tie block. This will help you maintain the break angle you need to drive the cone. It sounds more difficult than it is. Good luck.

Jerryc41
03-08-2018, 04:55 AM
I've been down that road. Do not attach the strings directly to the cover as designed. They will break even if you attempt to remove the burrs from the string holes. Instead, make a simple wooden tie block that is bolted through new holes in the cover (don't use the existing string holes for the bolts). Radius the bottom of the tie block so it fits snugly against the cover, then cut notches so you can feed the strings from the saddle under the tie block. This will help you maintain the break angle you need to drive the cone. It sounds more difficult than it is. Good luck.

Thanks. That was one idea I had, but then I thought I'd put a strip of wood beneath the holes. I could then drill holes in the wood to match the holes in the metal cover. I thought that putting the wood under the cover would result in a sharper angle from the saddle to the tie-down. With wood on top of the cover, I'm afraid of the strings floating over the saddle. I'll take my time and think about this. I prefer a tie block to a jammed knot.

The holes in the metal cover seem like the worse possible way to attach the strings.

I hear you got quite a bit of snow where you are. A friend there lost her electricity last night. It's 44 degrees here now, and we have maybe 2" of snow left.

Jim Yates
03-08-2018, 07:44 AM
My Johnson uke has the holes in the cover plate. There have been Worth strings on there for decades (not the same set) and they've never showed signs of breaking.

107107

Jerryc41
03-08-2018, 08:14 AM
My Johnson uke has the holes in the cover plate. There have been Worth strings on there for decades (not the same set) and they've never showed signs of breaking.

107107

Interesting. I guess I'm just overly cautious. The edges of the holes on this cover plate seem very sharp, and I don't want to try to make them smoother. I thought about sliding a small piece of plastic tubing over the strings, but probably not.