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aremick
03-21-2018, 03:29 AM
I say lots of thread on travel ukes, but no one answered this question: Would a HPL like this one:

https://www.amazon.com/EUS-X1-Ukulele-Soprano-Beginner-Polishing/dp/B0749JBYD1/ref=pd_sbs_267_7?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B0749JBYD1&pd_rd_r=JXW125648QJG2V7C6KZQ&pd_rd_w=uZJij&pd_rd_wg=HSQbT&psc=1&refRID=JXW125648QJG2V7C6KZQ

be good for backpacking?

Jerryc41
03-21-2018, 03:54 AM
I say lots of thread on travel ukes, but no one answered this question: Would a HPL like this one:

https://www.amazon.com/EUS-X1-Ukulele-Soprano-Beginner-Polishing/dp/B0749JBYD1/ref=pd_sbs_267_7?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B0749JBYD1&pd_rd_r=JXW125648QJG2V7C6KZQ&pd_rd_w=uZJij&pd_rd_wg=HSQbT&psc=1&refRID=JXW125648QJG2V7C6KZQ

be good for backpacking?

I have found Enyas to be surprisingly good. I got a concert in November, the same deal you linked, for $18.21. It was a limited time sale on Amazon. I also got a tenor which I converted to a resonator. One thing that impressed me was the supports under the top. There is a strip glued right under the bridge, and there are supporting pieces that run over the bridge support. In order to prevent interference with the vibration of the bridge, those supporting pieces are notched! Someone was thinking! The picture below shows the circle I cut out for the resonator cone, and you can see how the support does not touch the bridge support.

107417

UkerDanno
03-21-2018, 04:54 AM
For backpacking and just a little bit more $'s, Outdoor ukulele would be your best bet, IMHO...:shaka:
https://www.outdoorukulele.com/

Uke Don
03-21-2018, 05:33 AM
Another vote for the Outdoor Ukulele. The hpl used in the Enya is somewhat brittle and I doubt it would survive much of a drop.

Rllink
03-21-2018, 05:34 AM
It is surprising how much abuse a plain wood laminate ukulele will withstand. The thing that suffers the most is the tuners.

besley
03-21-2018, 08:38 AM
I was at my workbench when something fell onto my Enya EUT-X1. The object wasn't very heavy, but the Enya cracked like an egg. So I would suggest an Outdoor Ukulele for backpacking. Or a Fluke/Flea. Or a KLOS.

On the other hand, if the Enya only cost you $18, why not?

librainian
03-21-2018, 02:17 PM
I took my tenor fluke strapped across my back on horseback like a quiver of arrows up into the eagle cap wilderness for a multiday trip and we took day rides all over the valleys with it too. I played the heck out of it on that trip in all kinds of weather and had no complaints.

MopMan
03-21-2018, 02:35 PM
I would not take a wooden instrument of any kind with me on the trail--water exposure is just too present an issue. I don't have one (yet) but if I ever feel the need to bring a uke on a trek I'm getting something made completely out of plastic or carbon fiber. As others have mentioned above, Outdoor Ukulele seems to fit the bill.

Of course, for $20, it's not a huge loss if your Enya gets destroyed. I see no problem with taking it along as long as you are prepared to accept the possibly of water damage.

Graham Greenbag
03-22-2018, 12:26 AM
It is surprising how much abuse a plain wood laminate ukulele will withstand. The thing that suffers the most is the tuners.

:agree:

I’m inclined to think that folk end up with more extreme and expensive solutions than they really need. A basic second hand laminate Soprano (eg. Kala KA-S) with some decent strings and a lightly padded gig bag will be just fine for virtually every situation that your other camping gear is expected to withstand (a bit of thought and sensible care is assumed for all your equipment including your Uke).

As a separate issue Bill (IIRC) makes an interesting point about Music to play and the media used to transport it, etc. I think that that point needs to be equally considered. Consider also the total weight of Uke and Music, is it significant and could it possibly be reduced without much practical penalty?

Jerryc41
03-22-2018, 01:25 AM
For toughness, I'd suggest a Flea or a Waterman.

Jerryc41
03-22-2018, 01:43 AM
The uke in the link is made of HPL, this is a heavy material in my experience, so its going to be a heavy instrument to cart around on your back? Wood is much lighter.

From what I have seen and read (Barry Maz), HPL is not only very light, but it's also impervious to damage from temperature and moisture. A member of our group has a Martin HPL, and he loves it - very lightweight, yet it has a great sound. Another member has a couple of Blackbirds, also very light and tough.