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Rllink
03-29-2018, 05:22 AM
I was just reading a few of the different threads and got to thinking. I have three ukuleles, and I figure that I'm going to use them up. I don't intend to keep them forever. I don't intend to sell them. Eventually they will get enough mileage on them that they will have to be replaced. I take reasonable care of them, but if something happens to one that I can't play it anymore, I'll get another. Anyone else feel that way?

Croaky Keith
03-29-2018, 05:39 AM
Hmm........now that I have found my ideal sized uke, I don't seem to be tempted into buying any more, so I guess I'll only replace this particular size, should anything happen to them - so.....yes - sort of. :)

mikelz777
03-29-2018, 06:13 AM
I take good care of my ukes and treat them gently so I can't even imagine wearing one out to the point of it needing to be replaced. So a modern day uke can't last 30(+) years? In 30 years I'll be pushing 90. By then it would be a double blessing if 1.) I'm still alive and 2.) I'm still wanting and able to play. I currently have 2 ukes and I'm seeking a 3rd. I could see myself riding it out with those 2 or 3. If I had 3 and lost/damaged one for whatever reason I'd probably stick with the remaining 2. If I had 2 and lost one, I would likely replace it.

Rllink
03-29-2018, 06:37 AM
The instruments will wear out with constant use and the wood will age and can go brittle. So you need to replace or restore every 5 - 10 years.
Its a good policy to follow, but there are some pitfalls in following the policy blindly. Models are discontinued, the wood used changes, the features change. Sometimes the "improvements" are not improvements. Also some times you can hit the jackpot and own a uke which suddenly is worth $5000 because of demand and market forces. Then the policy of playing it until it is worn out may not be the best choice. In some cases it may be a good idea to look after a uke which has a signature sound that defines your act because you can't replace it.
As an extreme example: a trade war could start or a wood species could be banned and you can't get the good stuff anymore so you have to make it last.
Even an old Mahalo which was the pick of the bunch and which you spent a month setting up can be hard to replace.
So if you are sure you can get a replacement, by all means just count on getting a replacement, but if you are not sure there is going to be a suitable replacement you may need a different strategy?

I don't even know if I will ever have to replace one. I don't think that I need to schedule it. Two of them are already five years old, and I have no intention of replacing them yet. But that's a lot of thinking Bill. You bring up a lot of points. It sounds like a conversation I had with my friend the other day who is buying up assault rifles before he can't get them anymore. I haven't given it that much thought. My thinking is that they will always make ukuleles, and I'm not particularly enamored with any of the three that I have. They are nice, but they are ukuleles. I suppose that if for some reason I couldn't get another mahogany Mainland concert, I would buy some other mahogany concert. There's a lot of nice mahogany concerts out there. If for some reason mahogany got banned, I would buy something else. Honestly, I don't have some specific ukulele brand, model, finish, tone wood, string type, preference. So I'm sure I could find a replacement if that happens.

valde002
03-29-2018, 11:04 AM
Not me. I kind of bond to my instruments. For me, I don't play music. I feel it. It is powerful to me. Sometimes I meditate using my uke, for instance today I was in the D minor scale. I also have some that are autographed; one by the folks at MHS. The other by my family members that everyone signed during our last known get together (it was my sister during our family reunion that got me into ukes!). I have my bunch that I do want to keep forever (and oh yes, my first uke is up in display!). Those are not "player ukes", I have several daily ukes for general wear and tear. Those can come and go although I value them and time spent, nothing lasts forever. Each uke is labeled so that anything left over after I pass go to them should they want it or to sell. Oh fly, envious Time, till thou run out thy race.

Ukecaster
03-29-2018, 11:27 AM
I can't imagine wearing out a uke, unless I were to strum it very heavily for many years, and if that was my style, I'd install a clear pickguard. After going through a few vintage Martin sopranos, I finally found one that I really like, so I expect that's a forever uke. The rest are rightfully nervous, or on the flip side, maybe they're waiting to get the hell out of here! :)

ScooterD35
03-29-2018, 11:44 AM
Well... I have a 70 year old Martin style 1 that’s still going strong, and my Flea, Fluke, Firefly and Mainland are all considerably more robustly built than it is. So, all in all, I expect my Ukes to outlive me.

I have friends that own spectacular guitars from the late 1800’s, as well as Ukes from the 1920’s and 30’s, all still in daily service. Catastrophic accidents aside, well made instruments don’t necessarily get “used up” in my experience. They just get more mojo!

Scooter

mm stan
03-29-2018, 01:26 PM
always treat yourself to upgrades.. buy when the opportunity is there, not impulse buys... youre going to get some lemons, we all do.. as you get too exited and you dont think properly or just bad luck of the draw.. some are luckier than others.. your ukes should out live you if you care for them well, depending you age LOL :) if you have the means to buy, do so... if not just be happy with what you have and enjoy them...happy strummings.

mountain goat
03-29-2018, 02:52 PM
I've never been sentimental about instruments, I've had plenty of great ones over the years and plenty that were quite average. They come & go, it's no big deal for me :D

yeah. this ^

pretty unlikely you'll 'use them up' Roly. like any instrument, they are built to be played.
i have been hammering a 1920s Hollywood uke for the last 5 years that was in dog whacked condition when I acquired it.
still, looks, feels and plays the same now.

Jim Hanks
03-29-2018, 04:06 PM
I started doing this to stop myself from selling.

"Hey, that's my uke" - Bruce Lee
:p

Jerryc41
03-30-2018, 12:44 AM
I doubt you would "use them up," at least not if you take reasonable care of them. There are old, cheap ukes still around after a hundred years. Imagine how long a good, quality ukulele will last. Unfortunately, I tend to buy but not sell, so I've accumulated more than I should have. Deciding what to sell has been almost impossible.

Jarmo_S
03-30-2018, 02:20 AM
I have only one uke. It is just ok about 140 euro laminate one that I spent sometime ordering "nut files or welding torch cleaners rather" and working and now it is so darn playable and nice.

It is though more about playing skills I have got from it than having any attachements to it. I know it is easy replaceable. I will keep it though even when it is not anything special as an instrument. Tap the top carelesly etc. Just a musical tool ;)

Rllink
03-30-2018, 06:45 AM
I doubt that I will ever wear one out. But I do take them out and about a lot. There is always a chance of something happening to one of them. But I think that in my mind I am trying to wear one out, and that is part of the motivation to play for me. I was thinking about it after I posted this thread and read the responses, and then I was down playing my Mainland, and I looked at it thinking, "I've played this a lot." It is no where near worn out, but anyone can see that it has been played a lot and it hasn't lived a sheltered life. Every time I play it, it gets a little more of its own character. It kind of frightens me to think that something would happen to it and I would have to start all over. So I guess that thinking about it, I've taken a little different attitude since I posted this thread.

DownUpDave
03-30-2018, 07:16 AM
"Hey, that's my uke" - Bruce Lee
:p

That's funny..............I'll fight you for it:cool:


To the question at hand, I own two LfdMs that have my name inside them with a nice personal inscription from the builder Luis. I will make sure those still in great shape to be handed down to future generations. The rest I will attempt to play into sawdust and not worry about them too much, though all are properly cared for

SoloRule
03-30-2018, 09:20 AM
That's funny..............I'll fight you for it:cool:
To the question at hand, I own two LfdMs that have my name inside them with a nice personal inscription from the builder Luis. I will make sure those still in great shape to be handed down to future generations. The rest I will attempt to play into sawdust and not worry about them too much, though all are properly cared for


I totally forgot my name is inside my LFdM . Thank you for the reminder.
I have gone through a batch of ukes in the last two years , the remaining one have special meaning to me.
Either I become friend with the luthiers or the seller is someone I admire or a very dear friend .
I believe I have sold everything that no longer holds special meaning to me . Wait, I have one more to go which is the Kala Baritone.

I had a six strings that I was terrified of wrecking it. It totally took away my desire of playing this instrument. I finally made up my mind it's time to sell it because it is unhealthy to be so afraid of an instrument !

BTW JIM HANKS Bruce Lee used to live upstairs from me. He was very friendly with me although I was just a kid coming home from school. He was already the movie star .

kvehe
03-30-2018, 09:35 AM
There is one uke in my little uke family that I'm terrified of wrecking or ruining in some way: it is the very humble mahogany laminate Takamine tenor in my avatar. In the late summer of 2013, Andrew bought the last 19 of a limited run and sold them for well below the street price at the time. MGM praised it highly (for the price) and I took the bait, although another tenor was the last thing I needed (famous last words). For whatever reason, I love it. It fits my hand, it sounds nice, and I love it. After a few weeks it occurred to me that I should buy a second one in case anything ever happened to the first one, but by that time they were gone. Lo and behold, last night I found one; it will be here on Tuesday. :)

hendulele
03-30-2018, 09:40 AM
I go through phases, too. For awhile I was looking for THE ONE ... the one I could show off and keep forever and would have the perfect sound and impeccable beauty. And I found it. (Pete Howlett tenor) And I loved it. And I felt the necessity of babying it so much that I was almost afraid to play it. I certainly wouldn't take it to a jam, which is the only place anyone other than my family would see it. So I sold it for something not irreplaceable. Maybe some day I'll get another super-high-end model. But now when I get new ones, they're meant to fill a niche I don't have. For instance, my next acquisition will be a six- or eight-string because I want some Byrds-like jangle.

Jim Hanks
03-30-2018, 04:58 PM
BTW JIM HANKS Bruce Lee used to live upstairs from me. He was very friendly with me although I was just a kid coming home from school. He was already the movie star .
:cheers:
Not worthy :worship:

Graham Greenbag
03-30-2018, 10:11 PM
I was just reading a few of the different threads and got to thinking. I have three ukuleles, and I figure that I'm going to use them up. I don't intend to keep them forever. I don't intend to sell them. Eventually they will get enough mileage on them that they will have to be replaced. I take reasonable care of them, but if something happens to one that I can't play it anymore, I'll get another. Anyone else feel that way?

Thanks for the thread, when you first posted I thought this could be interesting and it has been.

I recently sold two Ukes. One had been bought new by me and was a favourite a few years back that I took it everywhere, but for reasons unknown it ended up displaced and gathering dust. I tidied it up and played it again but the majic was gone so I sold it on to free up some space and to give someone else the chance to own it. The other was second hand when I got it and needed minor repairs and improvements which I did, again it was cared for and loved. However it wasn’t used quite enough so reluctantly I sold it to free up space. The interesting thing about that second and ‘second hand’ Uke is that I felt more like it’s custodian than owner, I really hope that its new keeper will enjoy and care for it.

My playing and tastes have changed a lot over the last few years so it makes sense, to me, to be willing to sell or pass on some Ukes that were right for me once but are no longer a best (or nearly that) fit. I also want to limit how many Ukes that I have (to between two and four) so that there is space in my home and life for other valued things too. Now I see that change or turnover possibly happening in the future too, though some other of my possessions have been with me for many decades - I tend to look after my stuff and keep that which does the job very well for me.

In the various items that I own I have noticed one common theme. We are all encouraged to purchase items of a ‘quality’ that is well beyond our current and envisaged needs, ‘all the gear and no idea’ is a phrase that springs to my mind. What’s most important is how you use what you have and selecting your purchases to match your envisaged needs. With that in mind I buy reasonably available Ukes that aren’t too expensive and that could be easily enough replaced, with something similar enough, should one get lost or brocken, etc. Luthier built Ukes aren’t currently in my sights but replacement of something build by any one of them shouldn’t really be an issue. Whilst one Luthiers work might not be that same as any others, and difficult to match, there are still many Ukes out there to be enjoyed.

In brief I buy to match my foreseeable needs, enjoy what I have and care for it as if it was going to be with me for ever. However, I also now expect that there will be some slow change (selling and buying) in what I own because what I own needs to change to match changes in my needs.

Croaky Keith
03-30-2018, 11:59 PM
I had to buy online as there aren't any shops around here, & It took me about two years to find what I really wanted - but since getting it, I got myself just one more of higher quality, & now, I am no longer looking for anything else - I have found what I was looking for all along - the long neck concert - now I am happy with what I have. :)

igorthebarbarian
03-31-2018, 09:22 AM
This makes me think of the “drive it until it stops running” thought about buying new cars. Thankfully new ukes are much, much, much cheaper than new cars!

mjh42
04-01-2018, 04:01 AM
I only have one ukulele. My wife a musician of over 40 years said get one with a solid wood top. So I did. Paid for some upgrades also. Will it be my one and only? Does my skill level warrant buying another? I like the thought of buying into the level you aspire to. I also think quality is worth a few extra bucks. As a novice I'm pretty sure I'm not going to buy, buy,buy.....I'm learning and having fun but have other parts of my life also. Been thinking about an Outdoor or Waterman for times at the lake and camping, been thinking about a Martin model 2 top quality and all, been thinking about a resonator from National. I tend to keep things for a long time so long as they are working for me. If they don't work it is easy to let them go.

Ukecaster
04-01-2018, 05:35 AM
I only have one ukulele. My wife a musician of over 40 years said get one with a solid wood top. So I did. Paid for some upgrades also. Will it be my one and only? Does my skill level warrant buying another? I like the thought of buying into the level you aspire to. I also think quality is worth a few extra bucks. As a novice I'm pretty sure I'm not going to buy, buy,buy.....I'm learning and having fun but have other parts of my life also. Been thinking about an Outdoor or Waterman for times at the lake and camping, been thinking about a Martin model 2 top quality and all, been thinking about a resonator from National. I tend to keep things for a long time so long as they are working for me. If they don't work it is easy to let them go.

All that thinking might lead to something! ;)

UkerDanno
04-01-2018, 06:42 AM
My Martin is 85 years old and still going strong! It shows it's age physically, but sounds and plays wonderfully. It's a future family heirloom? As well as my Kanile'a, I would hope my son or grandson have enough interest to enjoy them when I'm long gone. I can't imagine playing a quality instrument into sawdust!?!?!? :shaka:

sukie
04-01-2018, 10:56 AM
My Moore Bettah is certainly not disposable.
Why do you think an ukulele would wear out?

kerneltime
04-01-2018, 11:56 AM
Relevant.. go watch videos on Willie Nelson and Trigger
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uhQuJTc5yFY

MopMan
04-02-2018, 02:10 AM
I like to think mine will last indefinitely as long as I care for them. And yes, they may get dings and scratches over their lives. In that way they are like people--we all develop our own character as we get knocked around and age.

It is possible that one day one of my babies may get crushed and die, but I try not to think about that. If it does happen it will be a sad day, but I'm sure other ukes will be out there for me to enjoy. As the saying goes... "there are many ukes in the sea."

Mivo
06-21-2018, 05:01 PM
I've gone back and forth on that question a few times, and my preferences have changed several times, and they might again as I continue on this musical journey. I got my baritone back after selling it two years back, and right now that's my preferred size and favorite instrument, which previously I would never have thought possible (used to feel that baritones aren't really ukuleles). Likewise, I sold a tenor that I never expected to sell, because the connection didn't hold. So who knows what I'll enjoy down the road!

I try not to get too attached to "stuff", so while I do enjoy my current instruments, I think I could be happy with any properly set-up ukulele that's comfortable for me to play. If I get too attached, I start worrying about damaging or losing it, and that gets in the way of enjoyment for me.

Jerryc41
06-22-2018, 01:37 AM
I take good care of my ukes and treat them gently so I can't even imagine wearing one out to the point of it needing to be replaced.

Right! Unless your fingernails or a pick keep hitting the top of the uke, I don't see it "wearing out." Strings and tuners can always be replaced. Parts that separate can be re-glued.

UkerDanno
06-22-2018, 03:48 AM
Right! Unless your fingernails or a pick keep hitting the top of the uke, I don't see it "wearing out." Strings and tuners can always be replaced. Parts that separate can be re-glued.

What do you consider worn out?
109948

Down Up Dick
06-22-2018, 04:09 AM
In my younger days I sold or traded stuff to people and had nothin’ but trouble doin’ it. They weren’t happy with it or were angry that I charged too much or decided that they didn’t really want it after all. If I took an “ all sales are final” stance, they became angry and made a fuss. So I haven’t sold or traded anything for years.

I have given stuff away, and I do trade things in when I’m buying somethin’ new. So, my garage and closet is growing fuller and fuller. Pretty soon you’ll see us on the TV Hoarder Shows.

Graham Greenbag
06-22-2018, 05:59 AM
In my younger days I sold or traded stuff to people and had nothin’ but trouble doin’ it. They weren’t happy with it or were angry that I charged too much or decided that they didn’t really want it after all. If I took an “ all sales are final” stance, they became angry and made a fuss. So I haven’t sold or traded anything for years.

I have given stuff away, and I do trade things in when I’m buying somethin’ new. So, my garage and closet is growing fuller and fuller. Pretty soon you’ll see us on the TV Hoarder Shows.

I can relate to where you are at and yes there are more than just a few difficult buyers and sellers out there. In recent times I’ve been letting some items go to free-up space, etc., and have done that via eBay. It takes time and carriage can be significant but, so far, it’s worked for me. So far lots of photos, a good and long description, and total honesty about any known issues has worked for me - I’ll refuse to sell something (by removing their bids and barring them from rebidding) to anyone I think isn’t genuine or honest too.

Perhaps it would be helpful to you to revisit selling things on. Technology has changed much of how we do things and sometimes letting things go is good for us and the buyer too.

Down Up Dick
06-22-2018, 07:01 AM
Graham, you’re probably right, but I just don’t wanna be bothered with fussy, mind changing people. Also, some of the stuff that I have to sell or trade is somewhat outdated.

I’ve never used eBay though I look through it once in a while, but I’ve heard bad things about it, so I’m a bit leary of using it.

As long as I can still see the car in the garage, it’ll be all right. :old:

Joyful Uke
06-22-2018, 07:50 AM
So I haven’t sold or traded anything for years..

If you don't mind a bit less money than selling it directly to someone, you could go through someplace like Elderly. They have a form on their website that you can fill out & they'll get back to you with an estimate on what they'd pay for it. You can then decide if it's worth selling. Of course, you also have to pay shipping, & they may change their price once they see the instrument, but I have done this, & found them to be fair. Other places will do the same sort of thing, too, so if you have instruments gathering dust & don't want the potential hassles of selling directly to someone, this might be another option.

Down Up Dick
06-22-2018, 08:13 AM
If you don't mind a bit less money than selling it directly to someone, you could go through someplace like Elderly. They have a form on their website that you can fill out & they'll get back to you with an estimate on what they'd pay for it. You can then decide if it's worth selling. Of course, you also have to pay shipping, & they may change their price once they see the instrument, but I have done this, & found them to be fair. Other places will do the same sort of thing, too, so if you have instruments gathering dust & don't want the potential hassles of selling directly to someone, this might be another option.

Yeah, I know Elderly buys stuff, but it still seems like a hassle. It’s just easier to keep it unless maybe I can use it for a trade in. And I do play my ukes once in a while to sing or whistle with. I’m also working on finger-style with my baritone.

In high school, I played a lot of different instruments. Then I played the cornet for years. After that I traded from new instrument to new instrument (lots), but only one at a time. UAS got me for awhile, and now, I’ve gotten caught up in BAS and MAS, and my music room looks like a stringed instrument store.

I guess it’s all good for the economy. :old:

kohanmike
06-22-2018, 10:24 AM
At first I bought ukes for the look, in a year about 16, then I got more discriminating so I culled them down to 4 of the best playing. Now up up to 8, with 3 being custom. I’m not concerned about playing any of them out and about, at gigs or rehearsal because they’re meant to be played.

captain-janeway
06-22-2018, 10:52 AM
Relevant.. go watch videos on Willie Nelson and Trigger
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uhQuJTc5yFY

Exactly what I was going to post up. First thing I thought of.

captain-janeway
06-22-2018, 10:59 AM
I'm a new player but already have several. For me it's all about finding a good fit and basically a good everyday. I'll probably sell off the others. Unfortunately what feels good is a soprano neck because it's little and a tenor body because the sound is richer. I'm not fond of the high pitched sopranos.
The Duke 10 I just bought might up in the for sale category. Love the sound, but neck is hard to play.
As I get better something will just click.

Mivo
06-22-2018, 01:53 PM
In my younger days I sold or traded stuff to people and had nothin’ but trouble doin’ it. They weren’t happy with it or were angry that I charged too much or decided that they didn’t really want it after all. If I took an “ all sales are final” stance, they became angry and made a fuss. So I haven’t sold or traded anything for years.

I was hesitant to sell some of my ukes because I half expected there'd be some issues, even horror scenarios like someone charging back money. But the experiences were entirely positive. No problems, no balking, no arguments -- everyone seemed happy. One person asked for a "trial period" and I unthinkingly agreed to it, but that worked out too and they kept the instrument (they had paid upfront). Wouldn't do the latter again, though.

Mr. Sweetie
06-22-2018, 10:44 PM
I keep most instruments I buy. I sell off, give away, or trade most anything that doesn't resonate with me early on, long before I get attached to it or would consider it a favorite. In fact if it was ever considered a favorite, I would likely not sell it. I would say that my attitude with digital gear and recording is slightly different. I end up keeping less than 40 percent of that stuff, but still sentimental about my first synth but otherwise, it if it collecting dust, I could use that money for more ukuleles.

Jerryc41
06-23-2018, 12:23 AM
I was hesitant to sell some of my ukes because I half expected there'd be some issues, even horror scenarios like someone charging back money. But the experiences were entirely positive. No problems, no balking, no arguments -- everyone seemed happy. One person asked for a "trial period" and I unthinkingly agreed to it, but that worked out too and they kept the instrument (they had paid upfront). Wouldn't do the latter again, though.

I've bought and sold over 400 items on eBay with no problems at all.

Mivo
06-23-2018, 12:54 AM
I've bought and sold over 400 items on eBay with no problems at all.

I didn't want to sell my instruments through eBay because of the fee they take (10% plus another 3% or so for PayPal). I like buying through eBay, though, and have 452 positive feedbacks, but only one of them was from me selling something (I received half a dozen messages from people who wanted to buy the item - a synthesizer - directly from me, bypassing eBay, but that seemed suspicious to me.). I sold my ukes to members on here and over on the German ukulele board, which allowed me to also consider their reputation. This also helped when I bought a few used instruments from folks who post here regularly.

Jerryc41
06-23-2018, 01:24 AM
I didn't want to sell my instruments through eBay because of the fee they take (10% plus another 3% or so for PayPal). I like buying through eBay, though, and have 452 positive feedbacks, but only one of them was from me selling something (I received half a dozen messages from people who wanted to buy the item - a synthesizer - directly from me, bypassing eBay, but that seemed suspicious to me.). I sold my ukes to members on here and over on the German ukulele board, which allowed me to also consider their reputation. This also helped when I bought a few used instruments from folks who post here regularly.

Yeah, those two fees really eat into the profit, but it's still better than having something sitting around gathering dust.

Selling outside of eBay removes the protection that eBay and PayPal provide. eBay keeps all the messages between buyer and seller and will even block attempts to exchange email addresses.

Rllink
06-25-2018, 02:59 AM
I didn't want to sell my instruments through eBay because of the fee they take (10% plus another 3% or so for PayPal). I like buying through eBay, though, and have 452 positive feedbacks, but only one of them was from me selling something (I received half a dozen messages from people who wanted to buy the item - a synthesizer - directly from me, bypassing eBay, but that seemed suspicious to me.). I sold my ukes to members on here and over on the German ukulele board, which allowed me to also consider their reputation. This also helped when I bought a few used instruments from folks who post here regularly.I don't see what a buyer would gain by doing a back room deal, unless they are trying to talk the seller into passing on a bit of the cost of fees. Regardless, I would be very suspicious of that. I'm not smart enough to keep up with all of the scams out there.

Jerryc41
06-25-2018, 05:53 AM
I don't see what a buyer would gain by doing a back room deal, unless they are trying to talk the seller into passing on a bit of the cost of fees. Regardless, I would be very suspicious of that. I'm not smart enough to keep up with all of the scams out there.

They want to bypass the fees, but some also want something for nothing. eBay is a popular place for scammers. Some buyers and sellers go to great lengths to try to cheat people.

Rllink
06-25-2018, 07:38 AM
Interesting what direction this thread has gone. I don't think that I stated myself very well in the first place and it immediately went off on its own. That's okay with me, we are all just talking here. But my intent was not to talk about wearing out ukuleles and how long that might take, or even if it is possible, it was about getting rid of them as fast as you buy them. I think when I started the thread that there was a lot of chatter going on about resale values, how well particular ukuleles held their value over time, how popular they were in the Marketplace, and my thought at the time was "who the heck buys a ukulele and one of the first concerns they have, before they even buy it, is how well it will hold its value and how easy it will be to get rid of?" So I still wonder that. I'm sure there are people who take that into consideration. And when I talked about keeping them forever, it wasn't about how long it would hold up to playing it, it was about how long people plan to keep them before they dump them and get something else. So let's take it in that direction and see if it can go for at least a few more pages.

Jerryc41
06-25-2018, 08:02 AM
Interesting what direction this thread has gone. I don't think that I stated myself very well in the first place and it immediately went off on its own. That's okay with me, we are all just talking here. But my intent was not to talk about wearing out ukuleles and how long that might take, or even if it is possible, it was about getting rid of them as fast as you buy them. I think when I started the thread that there was a lot of chatter going on about resale values, how well particular ukuleles held their value over time, how popular they were in the Marketplace, and my thought at the time was "who the heck buys a ukulele and one of the first concerns they have, before they even buy it, is how well it will hold its value and how easy it will be to get rid of?" So I still wonder that. I'm sure there are people who take that into consideration. And when I talked about keeping them forever, it wasn't about how long it would hold up to playing it, it was about how long people plan to keep them before they dump them and get something else. So let's take it in that direction and see if it can go for at least a few more pages.

I've sold seventeen within the past year, but I didn't buy any with the intention of selling them. Even now, when I buy a ukulele, it's because I like it. Eventually, I find something that I like a bit more. So far, I've averaged 76.4% of the purchase price for the ones I've sold.

Tootler
06-25-2018, 09:56 AM
I've only ever sold one. I got about 2/3 what I paid for it and was happy with that. I've given a few to charity shops, one to a charity raffle and one to my granddaughter. I have couple I want to move on. The rest of mine are keepers either to play myself or as loan should I try starting another group.

Rllink
06-25-2018, 10:20 AM
In my case at least, I have bought three ukuleles with specific purposes in mind, and none of those purposes has anything to do with getting rid of any of them, or replacing one unless it gets destroyed by some accident. So resale value or if it was something that I could get rid of quickly did not factor into my decision to buy any of them.

Joyful Uke
06-25-2018, 10:50 AM
Initially, it never occurred to me to consider possible resale value. But, along the way, some ukuleles didn't work out for me. (Caused hand pain, for example.) So, I now keep in mind that while I hope that any ukulele I buy is a keeper, there might be circumstances where it's the right thing to rehome a ukulele.

Since I usually can't try before I buy, I now do keep in mind how hard or easy it might be to sell something if it doesn't work out. I've not bought a few ukuleles that sounded great, but I didn't know if they'd work for me, and how hard it would be to sell them if that needed to happen. In fact, I find that limiting my UAS a bit, so in that sense, it's possibly a good thing. I have some great ukuleles, so shouldn't be looking anymore, but it sure is fun. :-)

Nickie
06-25-2018, 12:30 PM
I'm a new player but already have several. For me it's all about finding a good fit and basically a good everyday. I'll probably sell off the others. Unfortunately what feels good is a soprano neck because it's little and a tenor body because the sound is richer. I'm not fond of the high pitched sopranos.
The Duke 10 I just bought might up in the for sale category. Love the sound, but neck is hard to play.
As I get better something will just click.

Captain,
I didn't like the neck on my Duke, either. What is the issue with yours? Mine was way too fat, and I didn't want a finish on it.
So off to my luthier it went. He got rid of the awful shape, and produced a nicely shaped neck with no paint. He sanded it down real smooth and waxed it. I never looked back, I play the heck out of it now.

Nickie
06-25-2018, 12:47 PM
I doubt if an ukulele can be worn out. I've seen some pretty trashed out electric guitars and basses that are still going. And Trigger, geezus...
Frets can be replaced, necks and bridges can be glued back on if they come off. Necks that are too big can be reshaped.
Ukes can be literally taken apart and put back together. They can be refinished (My luthier said this is a PITA). Even the fretboards can be replaced. I've started to make holes in mine where a pick guard should be, but do I care? Probably not. I'll probably replace the tuners on my go to uke someday, I can tell one of them is already wearing out.
I'm probably spoiled, there are two very good luthiers near me, but for the life of me I can't understand why people keep swapping, looking for a "dream uke", when it is way more financially feasible to have something repaired or modified, unless the dang thing just sucks so bad nothing will help it.
On the other hand, once you "mod" your uke, you have an ice cube's chance in hell of reselling it.
But then, I'm not much of an ukulele shopper, I'd just as soon keep what I got and go dress shopping. All of my clothes put together cost less than my most expensive uke, so clothes shopping is cheap fun! And I'm not constantly training my hands to get used to another uke.
I'm pretty darn sure my ukes, short of a major fire, will outlast me, and the person who gets them next.

Oldtoolie
06-25-2018, 10:48 PM
Wear out? Here's a guitar from 1679..... https://forgottenguitar.com/2016/02/04/the-only-playable-stradivarius-guitar-left-in-the-world-the-sabionari-made-in-1679-video/

sculptor
06-27-2018, 10:39 PM
I guess I'm in that mode too but kind of by default. It's not in my nature to keep buying more of the same thing when what I've got works well enough. Note, I was careful to avoid the beginner instrument trap knowing those beginner instruments can be wasted money.

-- Gary

Rllink
06-28-2018, 03:04 AM
Like I said a few posts ago, when I started this thread I wasn't really talking about wearing one out. But as long as it keeps going that direction, wore out is just another one of those subjective things. I mean everyone likes to point to poor trigger as an example, no matter that it is a bit extreme. But I've known people to get a couple of scratches in a uke, or a guitar, or a car, and it is time to dump it and get something else. So it isn't always a matter of whether it is playable or not. Some people just can't stand a ukulele with a scratch.

Mivo
06-28-2018, 02:02 PM
Like I said a few posts ago, when I started this thread I wasn't really talking about wearing one out. But as long as it keeps going that direction, wore out is just another one of those subjective things.

True. I try to consider this when making the purchase. For example, I wouldn't buy a ukulele with a walnut fretboard, and when I was briefly into banjos and guitars, I quickly learned about normal (nickle?) vs. stainless steel frets (apparently the former can wear within a few years, with steel strings). I may never actually "wear down" an instrument, but I don't want to buy one where I feel (justified or not) that it may need repairs/maintenance work in five years. This includes finishes that are likely to go brittle or turn yellow.

I think what's more likely though is that people want something new (a new experience) and they don't want to hoard instruments or simply can't afford to. I recall some posters who'd get a used uke, play it for a year or so, and then sell it to buy another used uke that offers a different experience or sound. I admire this agile, flexible, and adventurous mindset, though I'm not yet at the point where I would comfortably take that approach. But it impresses me nonetheless. :)

Jan D
06-28-2018, 05:33 PM
You read my mind, Campbell. :-)
Jan D.

raffrox
06-29-2018, 03:18 PM
I was given a little Ohana SK-38 which has sentimental value so I upgraded to tuners to gotoh planetary tuners and I'll keep that as a bit of fun and as a keepsake.

Otherwise I find it really hard to hold onto my uke's to see if they even get wear and tear!! For me, there are some many wonderful uke's in this world and the only way I am going to get to play more of them is by buying and re-selling. You also get to meet quite a few uke players that way as well.

Although a recent purchase of a Pono MCPC might have me keeping this one for a very long time (or at least until my playing improves enough for a ultra premium uke of some sorts).

Rllink
12-13-2018, 03:19 AM
Like I said a few posts ago, when I started this thread I wasn't really talking about wearing one out. But as long as it keeps going that direction, wore out is just another one of those subjective things. I mean everyone likes to point to poor trigger as an example, no matter that it is a bit extreme. But I've known people to get a couple of scratches in a uke, or a guitar, or a car, and it is time to dump it and get something else. So it isn't always a matter of whether it is playable or not. Some people just can't stand a ukulele with a scratch.I was thinking about this thread while I was stripping the MiSi and the tuners off of my broken ukulele this morning.

Jerryc41
12-14-2018, 01:08 AM
Interesting idea. I guess "if something happens" is the key to your statement. You'll keep your ukes, but if one is broken beyond a simple repair, you'll replace it. I've never bought a ukulele with the idea of selling it. I bought it because it appealed to me somehow. However, I've sold about twenty ukes this year, and I hope to sell more over the next few months. Something similar but more appealing comes along, and I realize I can part with the first one.