PDA

View Full Version : Guitar vs Ukulele



DownUpDave
05-13-2018, 02:12 AM
When I bought my Taylor GS mini a few months ago I thought it would not be long until I sold off most of my ukes. Guitar has THE SOUND I have always strived for with my linear tuned ukes, deep, full, resonant. I also bought a used Taylor 512e 12 fret, cedar and mahogany. This thing is like angels singing when finger picked, unbelievably good.

Then I went away on vacation a couple weeks ago and took my Kimo tenor, I always take a uke on vacation. Spending one week with it got me to re-appreciate the lovely sound a ukulele produces. No it is not a guitar, not even close, but it sounds nice anyways. Then I played my Kamaka super concert, one of my few reentrant strung ukes. Holy Cow a great reentrant is wonderful for strumming and singing.

There appears to be room in my musical life for uke and guitar. Sorry to fellow UUers if I got you excited about a huge sell off of excellent ukuleles. I am spending 80% of my playing time with guitar now because of the learning curve. I will sit on my stash of ukes for one year then have an honest assesment of where I am headed and what I should keep and or sell.

There is a big disadvantage to playing/learning both uke and guitar when you are at my level. It can be very confusing and slows down the learning curve on both instruments, espiecally muscle memory. Some people would scorn this approach but I play for my own enjoyment, I don't do this for money. I just LOVE the sound stringed instruments produce, it always makes me happy, no matter how well or poorly I play at times.

Anyone else in the same boat as me?????

Jim Hanks
05-13-2018, 02:19 AM
Yup, I can't stick to one instrument. Been playing NAF for a year or so and just started picking up whistles. Very different fingerings and blowing technique. Also recently picked up guilele and trying to make sense of what to do with the two extra strings. And then there's all the tunings on ukulele like you say - linear, reentrant, cuatro. I've accepted the fact that I'll never be "great" on any of them.

Alytw
05-13-2018, 02:26 AM
I am for sure. I’m playing guitar about 80% of the time as well, but still love to grab the uke. I think that getting the cordoba mini really was the catalyst to pick up a full size guitar after about 10 years.

SteveZ
05-13-2018, 02:45 AM
For me the best of all worlds is the tenor guitar. Steel strings have a sweet sound that I just cannot match with nylon.

I still have more ukes than anything else and they all get playing time. The ukes are more convenient, being able to grab-and-go with the ukes easier than with the guitars and banjo.

DownUpDave
05-13-2018, 03:10 AM
For me the best of all worlds is the tenor guitar. Steel strings have a sweet sound that I just cannot match with nylon.

I still have more ukes than anything else and they all get playing time. The ukes are more convenient, being able to grab-and-go with the ukes easier than with the guitars and banjo.

SteveZ, as you may remember I own a Blueridge BR40 T tenor guitar just like you. That is what started this whole mess, lol:p. They are a great sounding instrument and I encourage anyone looking for the steel string sound but keeping it more "uke-like" to get one. So much fun and they sound so good

Croaky Keith
05-13-2018, 04:00 AM
I don't do guitars, too big for me, but my problem at the moment is learning to play harmonicas, & that is keeping me off my ukes, but I am trying to learn to read music at the same time, & that makes it a slow process, but I'm sure I'll get there in the end, but luckily, I only play for my own pleasure, so no rush. :)

kvehe
05-13-2018, 05:49 AM
Yes, I am definitely in the same boat. Guitars, then ukes, then guitars, then back to ukes, then ocarinas, then ukes, then guitars, then NAF (thank you, Jim Hanks), then ukes, now guitars and ukes. Not necessarily in that order. I think there's some overlap, though: there's a particular short piece, played only on the first four strings, that I had a terrible time with in my classical guitar days, to the extent that my instructor just decided it was time to give up on the piece and move on. It worked out nicely on a tenor uke, and then I tried it on a baritone, and now it's no problem at all on the guitar.

kohanmike
05-13-2018, 06:07 AM
I played guitar for almost 50 years before I took up the uke 5 years ago, and bass uke a year later. I haven't touched my guitars since, I also find they're too big compared to the convenience and comfort of playing a uke. (I also learned harmonica from Lyle Waggoner of the Carol Burnett Show, but only dabble at it now.)

8 tenor cutaway ukes, 3 acoustic bass ukes, 8 solid body bass ukes, 8 mini electric bass guitars

• Donate to The Ukulele Kids Club, they provide ukuleles to children's hospital music therapy programs. http://www.theukc.org
• Member The CC Strummers: https://www.youtube.com/user/CCStrummers/videos (https://www.youtube.com/user/CCStrummers/videos)

Steedy
05-13-2018, 09:04 AM
I played guitar for most of my life before I discovered the ukulele. Then when I went uke crazy, it was like ukuleles were more fun and less work than guitar, so I mostly played ukes. But now, for me, there's room for both, and it comes down to which songs sound better on uke or guitar. Some songs work better for me on ukulele, and some work better on guitar, so they're like different tools for the same job, basically. A uke with C6 tuning is the same as a guitar capo'd at the fifth fret, so it's mostly the same chord shapes on both.

But with this dualistic approach, I now prefer playing Tenor and Baritone ukes, and small-body short-scale guitars, like a Taylor GS Mini or a Martin D-Jr. That way, the size difference isn't as great and it's physically easier to switch back and forth.

Kanya
05-13-2018, 10:00 AM
I've always wanted to play the guitar, but when trying it, I really had to struggle hard due to my tiny hands and my extremely short fingers. This is why I was more than happy to find "my" stringed instrument when discovering the ukulele some time ago. With regard to sound, I love both and I'm very happy that I can also enjoy the sound of the guitar as my husband plays not only the ukulele, but also the guitar. But to me, the ukulele opened up a whole new musical world!

Dionysis
05-13-2018, 10:44 AM
So I wonder whether youíve tried a guilele. I bought a guitar and promptly returned it when I realized how much harder it would be to learn. Plus having to give two names to chord shapes. Bleeyuckech. My decrepit old mind has a hard enough time with one name. But I wonder about guilele. I canít seem to abide linear tuning on any of muh yukes. I think if I had a guilele Iíd be there. Linear tuning plus more bass muscle. And.. the same chord shapes. It canít be that simple, can it.

twokatmew
05-13-2018, 01:35 PM
I've played guitar for almost 50 years but switched to ukulele about six months ago due to hand issues. Ukulele is more comfortable due to the smaller size, and surprisingly I *love* reentrant tuning. I've learned the new chord names and notes on the fretboard ... or so I thought....

Yesterday at Mighty Uke Day, I attended an ukulele big band workshop taught by James Hill. The workshop was fantastic, btw. :) I did fine playing chords, but when he divided us into four sections playing different (single note) parts, my guitar muscle memory completely took over. Suddenly my fingers thought the strings were D-G-B-E instead of g-C-E-A. It also didn't help that my aging eyes had trouble reading the small print (four sections of four staves to a standard letter-size page). I had to keep moving my music stand!

Anyway, it was a shock to find my fingers suddenly had a mind of their own! Needless to say, I'll be working on my sight reading with tenor ukulele in hand. :) That is, new tenor in hand. I visited Mainland Ukes and came home with a new uke. NUD coming soon!

andy2353
05-13-2018, 02:15 PM
When I bought my Taylor GS mini a few months ago I thought it would not be long until I sold off most of my ukes. Guitar has THE SOUND I have always strived for with my linear tuned ukes, deep, full, resonant. I also bought a used Taylor 512e 12 fret, cedar and mahogany. This thing is like angels singing when finger picked, unbelievably good.

Then I went away on vacation a couple weeks ago and took my Kimo tenor, I always take a uke on vacation. Spending one week with it got me to re-appreciate the lovely sound a ukulele produces. No it is not a guitar, not even close, but it sounds nice anyways. Then I played my Kamaka super concert, one of my few reentrant strung ukes. Holy Cow a great reentrant is wonderful for strumming and singing.

There appears to be room in my musical life for uke and guitar. Sorry to fellow UUers if I got you excited about a huge sell off of excellent ukuleles. I am spending 80% of my playing time with guitar now because of the learning curve. I will sit on my stash of ukes for one year than have an honest assesment of where I am headed and what I should keep and or sell.

There is a big disadvantage to playing/learning both uke and guitar when you are at my level. It can be very confusing and slows down the learning curve on both instruments, espiecally muscle memory. Some people would scorn this approach but I play for my own enjoyment, I don't do this for money. I just LOVE the sound stringed instruments produce, it always makes me happy, no matter how well or poorly I play at times.

Anyone else in the same boat as me?????

Dave

Is it a difficult transition to go from Fingerstyle on the fluorocarbons to steel strings, assuming you are playing Fingerstyle?

Rakelele
05-13-2018, 10:08 PM
After years of mediocre guitar playing, finding the uke was an epiphany in simplicity: four fingers, four strings, and an instrument that feels like cradling a baby instead of shlepping a piece of furniture. This simplicity finally made me understand the nature of a stringed instrument. So what I find is that I am a much better guitar player now then I was ever before, thanks to the ukulele. But the uke also made me realize that a regular guitar is just too big for me and makes me feel uncomfortable, which was another reason that stopped me from getting better at it.

So now, my interest is all about big ukes and small guitars of the guitalele/guilele type, and tenor guitars for the induplicable sound of steel strings. My preferences range from 17" to 21" in scale. I guess what I'm mostly interested in is a crossover of the two instruments, not settled on either uke or guitar.

I find it helpful to switch between different sizes, scale lengths, numbers of strings, and string materials. Adjusting blindly to these differences keeps my brains and muscles flexible.

DownUpDave
05-13-2018, 11:51 PM
Dave

Is it a difficult transition to go from Fingerstyle on the fluorocarbons to steel strings, assuming you are playing Fingerstyle?

I do play finger style and funny enough going from florocarbon to steel strings was not an issue. My guitars have low actions and are easy to fret, the top four strings seem to require the same or less effort to push down then my low G tenor ukes. I am playing all my ukuele chord melody pieces on the top four strings of my guitars as well as new easy fingerstyle pieces from "Guitar Nick's" website. That is a great site with LOTS of tabs, different difficulty levels and very good videos

Edit...........I am adding to this reply because it needs clarification. Looking at it from 6 weeks of concentrated practice going from floro to steel didn't seem like an issue but the first week or two it was. The tight spacing between strings caused all kinds of problems with flubbed and muffled notes. I also committed to a change in fingerstyle method of using my ring, middle and index fingers for strings 1,2&3 with thumb taking care of 4,5&6. With uke I use middle and index for 1&2 and thumb for 3&4. My ring finger, that never did anything was/is really dumb, weak and uncoordinated. This has taken alot of effort and dedication but its coming.

Rllink
05-14-2018, 03:41 AM
The ukulele speaks to me, the guitar doesn't. I have trouble trying to rationalizing things. I just go with what makes me feel good. I've always liked guitars and all my life I went into music stores and pawn shops looking at them and thinking that someday I would learn to play the guitar. I even had two in the basement at one time, one being my wife's that she played when she was in high school and one that belonged to my daughter. But it just never moved me enough to take it up. I just looked at them. I even went so far as to hang around with guitar players for a couple of months, but I could never get enthused enough about it to actually learn to play. But then I saw a ukulele and it spoke to me. I wanted to play it as soon as I saw it and I can't quit. Guitars still don't do that for me. Like I said, I can't explain it, that's just the way it is.

SoloRule
05-14-2018, 10:53 AM
In my experience - once you spent a couple of hour on guitar, everything come super easy on ukulele. I look forward to playing Dave's two Taylor(s) day after tomorrow.

bariukish
05-14-2018, 12:15 PM
As if I didn't have enough of a challenge learning chord melody on my ul40 and low g tenor (and various baris), now I've got to go get my guitar out of the closet, clean it up, and put a new set of Elixar lights on it. Browsing this thread makes me remember the goose bumps I got just strumming an open E on the 6 string. I'm not giving up on the ukes but I sure miss the resonance of those big steel strings.

DownUpDave
05-14-2018, 04:45 PM
As if I didn't have enough of a challenge learning chord melody on my ul40 and low g tenor (and various baris), now I've got to go get my guitar out of the closet, clean it up, and put a new set of Elixar lights on it. Browsing this thread makes me remember the goose bumps I got just strumming an open E on the 6 string. I'm not giving up on the ukes but I sure miss the resonance of those big steel strings.

Atta boy. I know how much you like your Pono UL40, but there is just something guttural about those two bottom end wound strings. Open E chord indeed.

wickedwahine11
05-16-2018, 01:50 AM
I just recently started playing the guitar after years of only uke, and I have to admit, (at least for the moment) I am preferring it. I am specifically learning slack key from Keola Beamer’s online instruction, and love the full, rich sound as well as seeing progress in my abilities. I gave probably tapped out on my skill as a uke player, and without intensive work won’t improve. I play instrumental arrangements and am happy with my ability, but will never learn to be Jake or Daniel Ho now. But on the guitar, I can’t wait to pick it up again as I am progressing from standing, to crawling and walking. The improvement is a huge emotional lift.

I got a Taylor GS mini e-koa, and am pimping it out. I am getting new Gotoh 510 minis installed on it this week, and already added a koa truss rod cover and ebony/abalone bridge pins - the ebony/abalone strap button goes on this weekend. Since it is not as easy for me to see the small white dots, I also added abalone fret dot stickers that are much brighter and bigger, so easier to see. Going to the dark side has quickly become an addiction...

108994

DownUpDave
05-16-2018, 02:32 PM
I just recently started playing the guitar after years of only uke, and I have to admit, (at least for the moment) I am preferring it. I am specifically learning slack key from Keola Beamer’s online instruction, and love the full, rich sound as well as seeing progress in my abilities. I gave probably tapped out on my skill as a uke player, and without intensive work won’t improve. I play instrumental arrangements and am happy with my ability, but will never learn to be Jake or Daniel Ho now. But on the guitar, I can’t wait to pick it up again as I am progressing from standing, to crawling and walking. The improvement is a huge emotional lift.

I got a Taylor GS mini e-koa, and am pimping it out. I am getting new Gotoh 510 minis installed on it this week, and already added a koa truss rod cover and ebony/abalone bridge pins - the ebony/abalone strap button goes on this weekend. Since it is not as easy for me to see the small white dots, I also added abalone fret dot stickers that are much brighter and bigger, so easier to see. Going to the dark side has quickly become an addiction...

108994

That is awesome. I like what you are doing to "pimp out" for koa GS mini. I love the picture, great wall of koa!!!! They all look so good. I have heard of these items being done and I like the idea, might have to implement some of those to my spruce/walnut GS mini.

Great to hear you are making good progress Stacey. I am the same, uke skills have transferred over well and I am up and "walking":music:

maki66
05-17-2018, 04:10 AM
I play a bunch of instruments, all badly.
Tin Whistle and Anglo concertina for Irish Trad(mostly), ukulele (mostly concert and baritone), a little banjo and banjolele (though clawhammer seems to give my hands problems and pain).
Just starting to get in to cigar box guitars with open tunings for blues.
I really enjoy singing, but sing badly.

DownUpDave
05-17-2018, 01:21 PM
I play a bunch of instruments, all badly.
Tin Whistle and Anglo concertina for Irish Trad(mostly), ukulele (mostly concert and baritone), a little banjo and banjolele (though clawhammer seems to give my hands problems and pain).
Just starting to get in to cigar box guitars with open tunings for blues.
I really enjoy singing, but sing badly.

Nice.......as I said in the opening I don't do this for money so if playing a bunch of different instruments badly makes us happy it's all good.

Down Up Dick
05-20-2018, 03:56 PM
I came very close to buying a Blueridge tenor guitar like yours, Dave, but opted for a Gold Tone short scale banjo instead. Though already up to my ears in banjos, now I’ve added mandolins too. I’m really into Irish music, but somehow it just didn’t seem right on a ukulele—I dunno . . . Now I’m lusting after an Octave Mandolin.

I still play my ukes once in a while. I’m learning to fingerpick my baritone and plinking on some of the others when I can sing. The singing sometimes makes me cough though—Asthma.

Maybe the tenor guitar will come later.

SweetWaterBlue
05-22-2018, 08:31 AM
It really depends on what you want to do with your instrument(s). I started with a tenor uke about 7 years ago. I wanted it mostly to accompany my voice. Feeling a need for more bass, which is really a matter of your tastes, I added a low G to it. One thing led to another and soon I had a baritone. It seemed to me to work better as a very portable singer/songwriter type instrument. I wanted to do some home recording, so I finally added a UBass and started multi-tracing. That gave me the fullness of sound I wanted to the type of music I play and sing.

Fast forward half a decade, and I joined a band consisting of a couple of ukuleles and a guitar. We all sang and performed. Influenced by the saying, "If two of you are playing the same thing, one of you is superfluous," my band leader asked me to play the bass instead of the uke. I did and it really rounded out the band's sound. Later, the other ukulele player quit due to other obligations. I tried to start playing the uke again in the band, but since our lead guitar player cant strum well due to arthritis and neuropatjy, the sound was too thin. So, I began playing rhythm guitar with a healthy helping of Travis picking for bass balance, when we don't have a sit-in bassist.

I still try to play the uke as a solo instrument for voice accoumpanyment, but to be honest it always leaving me wanting for more fullness (i.e. bass). I think there is a reason you don't see to many popular ukulele performers who don't have a guitar or bass backing them up.

Anyway, for me the guitar serves the purpose of providing a full sound with only once instrument. I still have a soprano, concert, and several tenors, but when I really want to perform more than a few songs, I almost always reach for my guitar. YMMV.

DownUpDave
05-25-2018, 11:14 PM
It really depends on what you want to do with your instrument(s). I started with a tenor uke about 7 years ago. I wanted it mostly to accompany my voice. Feeling a need for more bass, which is really a matter of your tastes, I added a low G to it. One thing led to another and soon I had a baritone. It seemed to me to work better as a very portable singer/songwriter type instrument. I wanted to do some home recording, so I finally added a UBass and started multi-tracing. That gave me the fullness of sound I wanted to the type of music I play and sing.

Fast forward half a decade, and I joined a band consisting of a couple of ukuleles and a guitar. We all sang and performed. Influenced by the saying, "If two of you are playing the same thing, one of you is superfluous," my band leader asked me to play the bass instead of the uke. I did and it really rounded out the band's sound. Later, the other ukulele player quit due to other obligations. I tried to start playing the uke again in the band, but since our lead guitar player cant strum well due to arthritis and neuropatjy, the sound was too thin. So, I began playing rhythm guitar with a healthy helping of Travis picking for bass balance, when we don't have a sit-in bassist.

I still try to play the uke as a solo instrument for voice accoumpanyment, but to be honest it always leaving me wanting for more fullness (i.e. bass). I think there is a reason you don't see to many popular ukulele performers who don't have a guitar or bass backing them up.

Anyway, for me the guitar serves the purpose of providing a full sound with only once instrument. I still have a soprano, concert, and several tenors, but when I really want to perform more than a few songs, I almost always reach for my guitar. YMMV.

I am curious, did you play guitar before you started uke 7 years ago.

tonyturley
09-24-2018, 06:54 AM
I'm a newcomer to ukes, after almost 20 years of playing guitar. I play in church almost every week. After finally finishing a long-running rebuild of an old archtop guitar, I dove into ukuleles by starting a Stew Mac tenor kit. Being me, I had to add a few personal touches, and spent about an hour last night smoothing out the bindings. Pyrography is another of my interests, and the top of the uke is going to get some sort of design; just haven't settled on what.

Uke #2 has already hit the workbench, as I've been cutting and planing wood to get ready for the build. Top will be Bear Claw Sitka, and the back/sides American Black Walnut. Mahogany neck with a BW fretboard. But that's not all ...

I've ordered plans for a tenor guitar. Tonewoods are on their way also, with the soundboard being Redwood and the back/sides Indian Rosewood.

After several years of dormancy in my woodcraft, I went to a woodworking school in Indiana back in August. I came away very inspired, and determined to ramp up my shop again. I like the sound of both a guitar and a ukulele, but I may like building them as much as I do playing them.

Ukecaster
09-24-2018, 03:20 PM
I hear you on the muscle memory. I played guitar for 50 years before taking up ukulele, and currently play electric guitar in a classic rock band. If I have a Saturday night gig, I need to stop playing uke midweek, and play only guitar, preferably a big honkin dreadnaught acoustic for a couple of days to reacclimate , so I'll be ready for guitar performance on Saturday. If I don't, muscle memory tells my fingers to play uke sized chords on guitar, which ain't pretty at a gig, believe me. :stop:

kerneltime
09-24-2018, 03:20 PM
When I bought my Taylor GS mini a few months ago I thought it would not be long until I sold off most of my ukes. Guitar has THE SOUND I have always strived for with my linear tuned ukes, deep, full, resonant. I also bought a used Taylor 512e 12 fret, cedar and mahogany. This thing is like angels singing when finger picked, unbelievably good.

Then I went away on vacation a couple weeks ago and took my Kimo tenor, I always take a uke on vacation. Spending one week with it got me to re-appreciate the lovely sound a ukulele produces. No it is not a guitar, not even close, but it sounds nice anyways. Then I played my Kamaka super concert, one of my few reentrant strung ukes. Holy Cow a great reentrant is wonderful for strumming and singing.

There appears to be room in my musical life for uke and guitar. Sorry to fellow UUers if I got you excited about a huge sell off of excellent ukuleles. I am spending 80% of my playing time with guitar now because of the learning curve. I will sit on my stash of ukes for one year then have an honest assesment of where I am headed and what I should keep and or sell.

There is a big disadvantage to playing/learning both uke and guitar when you are at my level. It can be very confusing and slows down the learning curve on both instruments, espiecally muscle memory. Some people would scorn this approach but I play for my own enjoyment, I don't do this for money. I just LOVE the sound stringed instruments produce, it always makes me happy, no matter how well or poorly I play at times.

Anyone else in the same boat as me?????

There is a joy in just listening and feeling the sound that comes from these instruments, I think we get desensitized and that might be the reason why trying a new kind of instrument renews the joy. That is the reason why I got a cello banjo, different kinda of ukes and I keep trying new strings..
You should keep rotating and have enough different sounding instruments..
After some time with a UAS infection, if the goal is to improve technique then it makes more sense to fix one uke and string set and just focus on technique. One needs to focus on songs, chords, notes, harmonization and arrangements as the sound of the instrument itself will not give the same goose bumps, it is a longer journey with fewer low hanging fruits. Getting a new instrument and the thrill of the new sound is a shortcut to get the joy.
Analogous to dating vs marriage?

DownUpDave
09-25-2018, 04:20 AM
It is nice to see this thread come to life again. Good conversations about guitars and ukuleles always draw out some great ideas.

@tonyturley....so glad to hear about your uke builds and the fact this got you back into your love for woodworking. I have a woodworking background, use to do it for a living. I am resisting the urge to go down your route, I want to concentrate on improving my playing skills first. Cause if I jump into building I'm afraid playing will come to a screeching halt:p

@Bill 1.....as always you make excellent points and observations, especially about keeping good instrument for future use. This is sound (pun intended) advice. I will go through periods of preferring a tenor or a soprano or baritone.

@Ukecaster......I hear you about the drawback of so many different instruments. I play in a ukuele group, three of us. When working up a new song I will only play and practice with the ukulele I have choice to perform with. If I am jumping around from baritone to soprano to tenor during that time I am screwed come performance nignt.

@kerneltime......So true about the discover and honeymoon period, so fun so lustful. But once all the string experimentation is done then it is time to practice and play. A few weeks ago I sat on my back deck with one of my guitars ( yes I have a FEW now, GAS is real as UAS). I played and sang 7-8 songs in a row. I just got lost in the music.......it was wonderful, I felt like a player

SteveZ
09-26-2018, 02:32 AM
The "muscle memory" situation is what caused me to go fifths on all my 4-string-based instruments. When I went from guitar to mandolin (tuned fifths - GDAE) my guitar ability dipped. When ukulele got added, I found constantly going from GCEA to GDAE aggrevating. It was easier to restring ukes to fifths than restring a mandolin to GCEA. When tenor guitar and tenor banjo were added (both tuned fifths - GDAE and CGDA), the fifths conversion for me was complete.

CGDA became for me the the preferred fifths tuning. Tenor guitar and tenor banjo are set CGDA or GDAE usually based on the genre to be played, and I stay mostly in the CGDA genres. Most ukukele designs acoustically take CGDA better than GDAE.

So, if one is like me - muscle-memory challenged - retuning to what feels comfortable can make amateur (or semi-pro) playing more fun. If one feels more comfortable with GCEA, tenor guitars and tenor banjos can be tuned GCEA as effectively as fifths. It does make life interesting when someone (usually without invitation) picks up one of my instruments and complains it's way out of tune. As long as the person doesn't start trying to autocratically retune the instrument, all is fine.

Down Up Dick
09-26-2018, 04:00 AM
I’m surprised at how easy my Kala tenor guitar is to play. I don’t like to read music with it because it’s confusing, so I use tabs or play by ear. I know I could read music with it, but I don’t wanna. Lately, I’ve been dabbling with classical music by ear, mostly Bach, but just easy stuff.

I really enjoy using picks except for chords. Chords are too loud, but maybe I’ll git usta ‘em. :old:

kaizersoza
09-26-2018, 12:53 PM
I'm in the same boat as you Dave, I only started playing guitar in January, I have played uke for nearly 9 years, when I got my first guitar I thought wow this is what I'm looking for, thats the end of the uke, but every time I practiced I was struggling with the guitar, it was hard work, so after an hour of finger pain, frustration and sometimes downright anger, I picked up the uke, it was fun it felt right, it made me smile, now 9 months in and after many plateaus with the guitar, I'm getting somewhere, I'm starting to really enjoy my practice, I look forward to it, then when I have finished and put it away out comes the uke and it is a joy to behold even now, apart from when I go to play a D chord on it and make a G shape lol, but I can honestly say I now love playing both instruments, they will be with me for life

TheBathBird
09-27-2018, 12:36 AM
I started playing guitar about two years ago, absolutely love the sound of steel strings and the extra bass. But I didn't think I'd be able to learn the new chord shapes unless I concentrated solely on guitar, so I sold all but one of my ukuleles and didn't pick up a uke again until a couple of months ago.

I progressed to the point where I could play fairly competently, but it has never felt as comfortable as the uke. Also, to my surprise, I found it much more difficult to source fingerstyle music that I actually wanted to play.

Eventually I found myself drawn back to the sweet sound of nylon strings and the ease of playing such a small instrument, I'm pleasantly surprised at how quickly I've remembered many of the ukulele pieces I used to know by heart - muscle memory is an amazing thing!

I was also diagnosed with cancer recently, and upcoming surgery will make it uncomfortable, if not impossible, for me to play guitar for a while. So I treated myself to a tenor Anuenue Moonbird, (because, RATIONALISATION!) and I have completely fallen in love with the ukulele all over again.

I haven't sold my guitars - yet - time will tell, but right now I am finding the familiarity of the ukulele hugely comforting. I'm also very much enjoying visiting UU again and seeing so many familiar 'faces' on the forums :)

DownUpDave
09-29-2018, 02:13 AM
I started playing guitar about two years ago, absolutely love the sound of steel strings and the extra bass. But I didn't think I'd be able to learn the new chord shapes unless I concentrated solely on guitar, so I sold all but one of my ukuleles and didn't pick up a uke again until a couple of months ago.

I progressed to the point where I could play fairly competently, but it has never felt as comfortable as the uke. Also, to my surprise, I found it much more difficult to source fingerstyle music that I actually wanted to play.

Eventually I found myself drawn back to the sweet sound of nylon strings and the ease of playing such a small instrument, I'm pleasantly surprised at how quickly I've remembered many of the ukulele pieces I used to know by heart - muscle memory is an amazing thing!

I was also diagnosed with cancer recently, and upcoming surgery will make it uncomfortable, if not impossible, for me to play guitar for a while. So I treated myself to a tenor Anuenue Moonbird, (because, RATIONALISATION!) and I have completely fallen in love with the ukulele all over again.

I haven't sold my guitars - yet - time will tell, but right now I am finding the familiarity of the ukulele hugely comforting. I'm also very much enjoying visiting UU again and seeing so many familiar 'faces' on the forums :)

It is so good to hear from you again Victoria, you were missed. I had wondered where you had gone...........the demon guitar stole you away. I wish you all the best with your cancer treatment. No doubt the ukulele will be great comfort and treatment for the body and soul.

Congratulations on the Anuenue Moonbird, they are fabulous instruments, did you get a concert or tenor size. Thanks for checking in and sharing

DownUpDave
09-29-2018, 02:30 AM
I'm in the same boat as you Dave, I only started playing guitar in January, I have played uke for nearly 9 years, when I got my first guitar I thought wow this is what I'm looking for, thats the end of the uke, but every time I practiced I was struggling with the guitar, it was hard work, so after an hour of finger pain, frustration and sometimes downright anger, I picked up the uke, it was fun it felt right, it made me smile, now 9 months in and after many plateaus with the guitar, I'm getting somewhere, I'm starting to really enjoy my practice, I look forward to it, then when I have finished and put it away out comes the uke and it is a joy to behold even now, apart from when I go to play a D chord on it and make a G shape lol, but I can honestly say I now love playing both instruments, they will be with me for life

That is great to hear........lifetime endeavours are rare and wonderful. So is music and that is the magic in all of this!!!

I remember my first attempt at guitar years ago. I was a perfectionist back then and wrong or flubbed notes would make me mad and frustrated. After the fun casual light heart nature of the ukulele I can play guitar with a more realistic approach, mistakes happen but I just keep at it.

Croaky Keith
09-29-2018, 03:50 AM
Steel strings can tempt a person - but a passion always returns. :)

(All the best with your treatment, hope all goes well.)

Down Up Dick
09-29-2018, 04:51 AM
Steel strings can tempt a person - but a passion always returns. :)

(All the best with your treatment, hope all goes well.)

Ahh, Keith, I respectfully disagree. I like to change uke strings better, but I much prefer playing steel with picks. :old:

TheBathBird
09-29-2018, 08:33 PM
It is so good to hear from you again Victoria, you were missed. I had wondered where you had gone...........the demon guitar stole you away. I wish you all the best with your cancer treatment. No doubt the ukulele will be great comfort and treatment for the body and soul.

Congratulations on the Anuenue Moonbird, they are fabulous instruments, did you get a concert or tenor size. Thanks for checking in and sharing

Thank you very much, Dave. Yes, the demon guitar is entirely to blame, I even dabbled a little in the truly dark arts of electric!

My Moonbird is a tenor, I absolutely love it.

TheBathBird
09-29-2018, 08:36 PM
Steel strings can tempt a person - but a passion always returns. :)

(All the best with your treatment, hope all goes well.)

Wise words, Keith! Much as I love those steel strings, I'd underestimated how much the little ukulele had crept into my affections.

And thank you :)

YorkSteve
10-14-2018, 06:28 AM
... I have completely fallen in love with the ukulele all over again.

I haven't sold my guitars - yet - time will tell, but right now I am finding the familiarity of the ukulele hugely comforting. I'm also very much enjoying visiting UU again and seeing so many familiar 'faces' on the forums :)

Good to see your name pop up again - hope your treatment goes well, and look forward to hearing more from you now you are back in the land of ukes.

TheBathBird
10-14-2018, 08:45 PM
Good to see your name pop up again - hope your treatment goes well, and look forward to hearing more from you now you are back in the land of ukes.

Thank you, Steve. I'm currently working up the courage to dip my toe back into the Seasons :)

plunker
10-16-2018, 05:14 AM
If man was meant to play guitar, he would have been given six fingers

DownUpDave
10-16-2018, 04:02 PM
If man was meant to play guitar, he would have been given six fingers

And if man was meant to fly he would have been given wings. Somehow man always finds a way:music:

As in huMAN kind.....don't want the ladies mad at us

Ukulele Eddie
10-17-2018, 06:07 PM
@BathBird, best wishes for your upcoming treatment. We will be holding you in our thoughts!

Like many others have commented, I am also drawn to the guitar tone. It does seem a lot more complicated, despite "only" two more strings. Go figure.

I find that playing smaller parlor sizes (size 0 or 00) with 12-fret joins and wider string spacing (>2.25 inch) make it much more comfortable. It's slow going, but I'm now finding it easier to go back and forth between instruments. My first song on the guitar I'm trying to learn is "Dust in the Wind" by Kansas. Good fun!

While I love the guitar, I think uke will likely always have most of my play time.

DownUpDave
10-18-2018, 01:54 AM
@BathBird, best wishes for your upcoming treatment. We will be holding you in our thoughts!

Like many others have commented, I am also drawn to the guitar tone. It does seem a lot more complicated, despite "only" two more strings. Go figure.

I find that playing smaller parlor sizes (size 0 or 00) with 12-fret joins and wider string spacing (>2.25 inch) make it much more comfortable. It's slow going, but I'm now finding it easier to go back and forth between instruments. My first song on the guitar I'm trying to learn is "Dust in the Wind" by Kansas. Good fun!

While I love the guitar, I think uke will likely always have most of my play time.

Just as you have done Eddie I gravitated to smaller bodied guitars, 00 size and 12 fret neck. Compared to my old Larrivee L01 (which is bigger than a dreadnaught, read massive) the 00 12 fretters feel very comfortable to play. But yea those two extra strings sure can complicate things

Lert
10-18-2018, 05:01 AM
Smaller bodied guitars are my favs as well. Love their sound.

S11LKO
10-20-2018, 12:40 PM
I'm not GREAT at anything, but I've been messing with guitars for about 50 years and I suppose I spend about 70% of my playing time with them. They ARE my first love.

The other 30% of my playing time is shared between my piano and my recently (the last year or so) love of ukes. I know this means I won't ever get close to 'mastering' any of them, but as I play just to amuse myself that doesn't worry me too much.

It's been a pretty rubbish year for me personally in many ways, but I fully intend to put more effort into my uke learning during 2019.

NewKid
10-30-2018, 06:36 AM
Hi Everyone,

I haven't been here in a while. Glad to see that MM Stan is still active. Got the sad news about Dirk of Southcoast. Learned that Mya Moe is now in the Chicago area and Aaron is back with Beansprout. And I just reconnected with William who is willing to sell me his Ukiyo Vita in the near future - the uke I miss the most.

After playing guitar exclusively for 25 years, I had uke fever from 2011 - 2014. I amassed 19 ukes over that time and I'm now down to my two favorite tenors. From 2015 - 2017 I played mandolin exclusively and was very happy with the one fine mandolin I acquired - a Phoenix Bluegrass.

Then this past April, I ran into a 1998 Froggy Bottom parlor guitar at Dusty Strings in Seattle and the guitar dominates my playing once again. In July I added a Telecaster and an amp and I've been having a blast.

This past weekend, I loaned my daughter's Kala soprano to a new friend and was showing her some uke basics. It made me pull out my two ukes and I played them for a couple of hours remembering all the fun I used to have. I particularly miss all my friends from Ukulele Fight Club in MO.

I think that even though I am mainly playing guitar again, that there is definitely room for ukulele as others have said here.

Dave, thanks again for taking that Kinnard baritone off my hands and glad you were able to pass it to someone else. Also thanks for starting this thread!

DownUpDave
10-30-2018, 09:54 AM
Hi Everyone,

I haven't been here in a while. Glad to see that MM Stan is still active. Got the sad news about Dirk of Southcoast. Learned that Mya Moe is now in the Chicago area and Aaron is back with Beansprout. And I just reconnected with William who is willing to sell me his Ukiyo Vita in the near future - the uke I miss the most.

After playing guitar exclusively for 25 years, I had uke fever from 2011 - 2014. I amassed 19 ukes over that time and I'm now down to my two favorite tenors. From 2015 - 2017 I played mandolin exclusively and was very happy with the one fine mandolin I acquired - a Phoenix Bluegrass.

Then this past April, I ran into a 1998 Froggy Bottom parlor guitar at Dusty Strings in Seattle and the guitar dominates my playing once again. In July I added a Telecaster and an amp and I've been having a blast.

This past weekend, I loaned my daughter's Kala soprano to a new friend and was showing her some uke basics. It made me pull out my two ukes and I played them for a couple of hours remembering all the fun I used to have. I particularly miss all my friends from Ukulele Fight Club in MO.

I think that even though I am mainly playing guitar again, that there is definitely room for ukulele as others have said here.

Dave, thanks again for taking that Kinnard baritone off my hands and glad you were able to pass it to someone else. Also thanks for starting this thread!

So great to hear from you and see you again on this site. There is definitely room for both uke and guitar........just whatever mood you are in at the moment. Froggy Bottom hey!!!!! Boy oh boy, nice guitar

mm stan
10-30-2018, 11:26 AM
Hi Everyone,

I haven't been here in a while. Glad to see that MM Stan is still active. Got the sad news about Dirk of Southcoast. Learned that Mya Moe is now in the Chicago area and Aaron is back with Beansprout. And I just reconnected with William who is willing to sell me his Ukiyo Vita in the near future - the uke I miss the most.

After playing guitar exclusively for 25 years, I had uke fever from 2011 - 2014. I amassed 19 ukes over that time and I'm now down to my two favorite tenors. From 2015 - 2017 I played mandolin exclusively and was very happy with the one fine mandolin I acquired - a Phoenix Bluegrass.

Then this past April, I ran into a 1998 Froggy Bottom parlor guitar at Dusty Strings in Seattle and the guitar dominates my playing once again. In July I added a Telecaster and an amp and I've been having a blast.

This past weekend, I loaned my daughter's Kala soprano to a new friend and was showing her some uke basics. It made me pull out my two ukes and I played them for a couple of hours remembering all the fun I used to have. I particularly miss all my friends from Ukulele Fight Club in MO.

I think that even though I am mainly playing guitar again, that there is definitely room for ukulele as others have said here.

Dave, thanks again for taking that Kinnard baritone off my hands and glad you were able to pass it to someone else. Also thanks for starting this thread!

Aloha Don, glad to hear from you, I hope all is well with you and your still strumming them strings up. Welcome back, I'm hardly on now, a friend messaged me of your post, happy strummings bruddah

bunnyf
10-30-2018, 01:24 PM
Dave, I’m kinda in the same situation as you. I enjoy my ukes but prefer the guitar in alot of situations. I love the fuller sound and sustain. It is harder though and sometimes I want the relative simplicity of the uke as well as its small size and sweet voice. So I’m never giving them up but they have to take turns with guitar and mandolin and if I ever get another tenor guitar, then that too.

frianm
11-01-2018, 05:26 AM
I have played the guitar since I was 12 - 62 years ago! I then moved to play banjo too. I have not played the guitar for three years and finally sold my big Martin. Now i switch between ukulele and banjo - makes me happy. I like the thinner necks. They share a "happy" sound as both are re-entrant instruments.
Mo 2 cents worth! Ian