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Jerryc41
05-15-2018, 02:11 AM
Why are round ukes called camp ukuleles? Barry reviewed the one below, but he thought the sound was too weak, probably because the bridge is down so low.

https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B0748761PR/?coliid=I1ZKQDYCI60OVI&colid=1K6S0U4KGY5NH&psc=0&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it

RichM
05-15-2018, 02:54 AM
Several manufacturers, including Gretsch and Lyon & Healy, produced cheap, simply made ukuleles in the 1920's, when ukuleles were incredibly popular. They were dubbed Camp Ukuleles, because they were cheap and sturdy and you could take one anywhere without worry. Now any uke made in that style is usually referred to as a Camp Ukulele.

EDW
05-15-2018, 03:16 AM
I have heard that the Lyon and Healy version is actually a fun uke and decent player when set up well.

RichM
05-15-2018, 05:08 AM
Some of the Lyon & Healys have really nice fit and finish. I've never played one, but they sure are pretty. I have played some vintage Gretsch camp ukes... and let's just say that they were probably good for keeping the fire going. :)

Xtradust
05-15-2018, 05:26 AM
I had read that the Lyon and Healy’s were called the "camp uke" because of the "fireside chats" that FDR had over the radio during the depression. Camping in the outdoors had also become popular.
The round blue and green ukuleles by Gretsch are called "army ukes" because they were sent with the GIs during WW2. I have one with a case that has Fort Dix stamped on it.

HatchetChuck
05-15-2018, 05:36 AM
What I want to know is.....why is an Irish new age music artist endorsing ukuleles? (Enya)

HatchetChuck
05-15-2018, 05:37 AM
I had read that the Lyon and Healy’s were called the "camp uke" because of the "fireside chats" that FDR had over the radio during the depression. Camping in the outdoors had also become popular.
The round blue and green ukuleles by Gretsch are called "army ukes" because they were sent with the GIs during WW2. I have one with a case that has Fort Dix stamped on it.

I'd like to see a picture of that green uke.

EDW
05-15-2018, 05:39 AM
I had read that the Lyon and Healy’s were called the "camp uke" because of the "fireside chats" that FDR had over the radio during the depression.

I thought that the L and H instruments were made prior to that time.

Jerryc41
05-15-2018, 06:01 AM
Several manufacturers, including Gretsch and Lyon & Healy, produced cheap, simply made ukuleles in the 1920's, when ukuleles were incredibly popular. They were dubbed Camp Ukuleles, because they were cheap and sturdy and you could take one anywhere without worry. Now any uke made in that style is usually referred to as a Camp Ukulele.

That makes sense, but why does round equal camp?

Jerryc41
05-15-2018, 06:03 AM
What I want to know is.....why is an Irish new age music artist endorsing ukuleles? (Enya)

Is there any connection besides the name?

Booli
05-15-2018, 08:11 AM
Is there any connection besides the name?

Maybe because it looks like a long-handled frying pan?

...like for baked beans over a campfire kinda thing...

Maybe that was a popular activity ~100 yrs ago and they brought out the ukes back then for the same reason that the Outdoor Ukuleles are popular now?

strat4me
05-15-2018, 02:54 PM
I have a L and H 1920's and I love it. It is the uke I play before going to bed, I can just smell the pine trees, hear the crackle of the fire and taste the marshmallows. I have seen them referred to as "fry pan" ukes too.

ukulelekarcsi
05-16-2018, 05:52 AM
Lyon and Healy were first to produce the shape, then Harmony, later on Guild. The quality dwindled, and there were differences in construction - see Jake Wildwood's blog for those. Anyhow, they're called Camp ukes, simply because the earliest examples were called that way by L&H on the headstocks, in a very curly script, impressed into the wood! If the first examples were marketed that way, it's no wonder the name stuck, especially since it's short and distinct. It could also make sense, since it's a bit smaller that regular sopranos, and takes up slightly less space, although it is heavier to drag along for a camping trip.

As for Enya ukuleles, they themselves claim it's an abbreviation for 'Elegant Natural Youth Artwork', and it is a Gaelic given name, but then the logo script is a clear rip-off of Enya's logo and signature (the Irish singer). I couldn't find anything about an official endorsement...

DownUpDave
05-16-2018, 08:32 AM
Maybe because it looks like a long-handled frying pan?

...like for baked beans over a campfire kinda thing...

Maybe that was a popular activity ~100 yrs ago and they brought out the ukes back then for the same reason that the Outdoor Ukuleles are popular now?

I own the Enya round uke as does Brenda and Kathryn. We all refer to it as"Frying Pan" as in........I am bringing the Frying Pan to the uke jam tonight.

Made a great serving platter for cheese and meats at Christmas. After all it is made from countertop material (Wilsonart/Arborite)

actadh
05-16-2018, 05:57 PM
My grandkids were gifted the Enya round ukes from me. I often play them and enjoy it.

I have a entry level sopranino camp uke I picked up from Jake Wildwood as well as one I got off eBay that is a wall hanger. I always imagine a kid opening them on Christmas day and playing them while dreaming of the outdoors.

Choirguy
05-16-2018, 06:25 PM
Don’t forget the Eddy Finn new “camp” ukulele.

https://www.eddyfinn.com/store/p67/EddyFinnMoonUkulele

Jerryc41
05-16-2018, 10:51 PM
Maybe because it looks like a long-handled frying pan?

...like for baked beans over a campfire kinda thing...

Maybe that was a popular activity ~100 yrs ago and they brought out the ukes back then for the same reason that the Outdoor Ukuleles are popular now?

That sounds like a good explanation. Now we need a combo uke and skillet. How hard could it be, right? : )

Bill Sheehan
05-17-2018, 11:01 AM
Jerry, not to hijack the thread, but your query reminds me of an unrelated one, pertaining often to baseball, that has had me baffled for many years:
Often, in the context of a 3-game series, when each team has won a game thus far, you'll hear the broadcaster refer to the third (tie-breaking) game as "the rubber game of the series". I cannot figure out how that expression might have been born, what the concept is behind it... any thoughts?

Bales1983
05-17-2018, 11:28 AM
Jerry, not to hijack the thread, but your query reminds me of an unrelated one, pertaining often to baseball, that has had me baffled for many years:
Often, in the context of a 3-game series, when each team has won a game thus far, you'll hear the broadcaster refer to the third (tie-breaking) game as "the rubber game of the series". I cannot figure out how that expression might have been born, what the concept is behind it... any thoughts?


I had the same thought a few years back on this and surprisingly enough the exact origin is not known! All i learnt is the term can be traced back to 16th century England and predates 'Rubber' as a material so has nothing to do with it being able to bend either way as i originally thought. From what I recall its likely to be linked to being 'rubbed out' as in eliminating the losing team or relating to balls rubbing together in lawn bowls.

Lee

Bill Sheehan
05-17-2018, 06:37 PM
Thanks, Lee! Glad to know that others have also scratched their heads over this one!

Graham Greenbag
05-17-2018, 10:21 PM
Jerry, not to hijack the thread, but your query reminds me of an unrelated one, pertaining often to baseball, that has had me baffled for many years:
Often, in the context of a 3-game series, when each team has won a game thus far, you'll hear the broadcaster refer to the third (tie-breaking) game as "the rubber game of the series". I cannot figure out how that expression might have been born, what the concept is behind it... any thoughts?

As lifted from the Oxford English Dictionary ( https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/rubber )

‘A contest consisting of a series of successive matches (typically three or five) between the same sides or people in cricket, tennis, and other games.
‘the opening rubber of Britain's Davis Cup tie against Argentina’

A deciding game in a rubber of cricket, tennis, etc.’

I hope that that confirms Lee’s clarification of a word that has several different meanings.

I’ve long been interested in Camp (round body) type Ukes. It’s a very different body shape and I assume that it was considered simpler (cheaper) to make and more robust than the traditional figure eight shape. To my mind the design must compromise sound quality but for its intended use that could be an acceptable trade-off against cost and durability.
[Edit. I guess that the alternative easy build ‘Cigar Box’ shape isn’t so easy to pack and is more likely to ‘catch’ its corners on other things, maybe the round shape is deliberately Banjo like to.]

Jerryc41
05-18-2018, 12:32 AM
I’ve long been interested in Camp (round body) type Ukes. It’s a very different body shape and I assume that it was considered simpler (cheaper) to make and more robust than the traditional figure eight shape. To my mind the design must compromise sound quality but for its intended use that could be an acceptable trade-off against cost and durability.

Good point. A circle is a very easy shape to make.

Bill Sheehan
05-18-2018, 04:57 AM
Thanks, guys, for the additional thoughts! Hope everyone has a good weekend!

Ukecaster
05-18-2018, 04:55 PM
That makes sense, but why does round equal camp?

Most campfires are round?

Jerryc41
05-19-2018, 01:26 AM
Most campfires are round?

They kind that people walk across in bare feet are long and narrow, but the singing/marshmallow kind are always round. :)