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nikolo727
05-12-2009, 03:22 PM
So Im about to become a senior in high school. I have decided that I would like to have a ukulele related job. I would like to get a degree in business and sales management with a minor in musical theory. What jobs in the ukulele field are available with those degrees??

Uke Republic
05-12-2009, 03:36 PM
Promote a Uke related artist or group with your business savvy.
Work with a company that makes ukuleles and sell their products.
Become a teacher and promote the ultimate instrument .....the kazoo...I mmmm ukulele
With your new found knowledge, you may perhaps design the ultimate ukulele and sell it to the masses then rule the world! (evil laugh)
Work for Trader Vics

Ukulele JJ
05-12-2009, 03:44 PM
Get your business degree with a focus on non-profit management. Then start a 503(c)(3) that gives away ukuleles. :shaka:

JJ

Spooner
05-12-2009, 03:48 PM
If you haven't already...learn to read music.
Get a band together or try to do it solo but...

a job that involves around uke that comes with some nice perks...

Ukulele musician on cruise ships!

I have a steel pan player friend who does it and wouldn't change careers for the world.

JKoval
05-12-2009, 04:07 PM
If you haven't already...learn to read music.
Get a band together or try to do it solo but...

a job that involves around uke that comes with some nice perks...

Ukulele musician on cruise ships!

I have a steel pan player friend who does it and wouldn't change careers for the world.

That man lives the ideal life... doing what he loves and seeing the world... good God, man.

Wagster
05-12-2009, 04:39 PM
Get your business degree with a focus on non-profit management. Then start a 503(c)(3) that gives away ukuleles. :shaka:

JJ

Um.... I think this position is already filled by a BIG, UN-HAIRY, INKY guy!!!!

:cool:

JT_Ukes
05-12-2009, 05:31 PM
Stand on a street corner and Strum my friend! Then pass the hat.

Pippin
05-12-2009, 09:48 PM
Making your living from something related to ukulele would be difficult unless you attain virtuoso level as a player. Add musical education to the mix and you can teach music in schools. Then, you could combine ukulele with the music ed... that would be a start.

Music has been a large part of my life and my working career, but I play lots of instruments. I am also an author, writer, editor, publisher, and photographer. So, the best advice would be to educate yourself in the "business of music" and figure out how you can work on your interest in ukulele and turn it into business opportunity.

Here are a few ideas aside from playing...

Musical instrument companies need marketing people, graphics people, sales people, luthiers and setup people, and the usual bookkeepers, logistics teams (including warehouse) and inventory control for both finished goods and in-process goods. Being able to write well can get you lots of opportunities in music, like Jim Beloff's career path with Billboard Magazine.

I hope this gave you some ideas.

buddhuu
05-12-2009, 10:16 PM
Talk to Ken! :D

See if he can put a word in with Ohana! ;)

experimentjon
05-12-2009, 11:42 PM
Business and sales? Welllll start an ebay store and undercut MGM and start an ebay price war with him. Hehe...price war. YEAAAAH!

deach
05-13-2009, 12:52 AM
Um.... I think this position is already filled by a BIG, UN-HAIRY, INKY guy!!!!

:cool:

lol .

GreyPoupon
05-13-2009, 02:32 AM
As Confucious said: "Pick a profession you love and you won't have to work a day in your life." But unfortunatly 'ukulele' is not really a profession.

Here is some career advice I wish I had heard when I was your age:

1) Don't pick your career by subject area - pick it by the skills you enjoy putting to use. 'Ukulele' is not a skill or action, it's a noun. Being a ukulele salesperson or a ukulele craftsman are two very different careers. What are the specific skills you want to spend most of your life exercising? Again, focus on the verbs not the nouns. Pick a career that allows you to do what you do best every single day.

2) Be very wary of tournament professions. Tournament professions are jobs where 10,000 people compete for only one spot. The person at the top makes a million, and everyone else starves. Acting is a tournament profession. Writing fiction is a tournament profession. Being an olympic athlete is a tournament profession. And, yes, ukulele playing is a tournment profession. If you embark down this road, make sure you have either amazing talent, rich parents, or an incredibly thick skin for suffering and angst. (And preferably all three.) The weird thing about these professions is that everyone looks at the top of the pyramid and somehow just ignores all the many many people who failed trying to march to the top.

3) Be decisive. The most 'successfull' people I know are not the smartest people I know but the most decisive: they made a decision and stuck with it. I've been a little shocked at the type of success someone can produce from true dedication, stamina and focus over many years.

4) Imagine yourself as a mediocrity. (Really!) Too many people imagine themselves as super successfull when they choose a career. There is a whole generation of lawyers who choose their career while watching LA Law who now spend their entire professional lives reading mind numbing contracts and wills all day long and they hate what they do. When you imagine yourself as a crazy success every career seems amazing. But only some careers still sound cool if your'e just ok at it. If your career choice still sounds ok even without tremendous success, that's a good hint that it's a good choice for you. (In other words, that's a sign you enjoy the profession as an end in itself and not just as a means to something else like money or fame.)

Yes, far more than what you asked for... my apologies.

hoosierhiver
05-13-2009, 03:19 AM
You've got the advantage of youth. Are you interested in making ukuleles? If you have the ambition and skill to become a good uthier, you could market yourself. Although you may never get rich doing this.

bool_schitt
05-13-2009, 05:05 AM
I'd totally go with the promote-ukulele schtick. You could take more theory lessons, then:

1) Rope together a few uke pros in your area and start a school
2) Set up a shop and work on importing high-end ukes in bulk
3) Just work to PR the uke in your area, unless its already in full swing

Here in Singapore, this duo did 2) and 3), and its going pretty well. Now we have access to proper standard Kala ukes, and we get JAMES HILL coming down to perform. Here's the link for reference:
http://ukulelemovement.com/
Anyway, the ukulele is slowly getting noticed, and the market is getting bigger. Capitalize, man!

generem
05-13-2009, 05:54 AM
Design a couple of Ukuleles, find a manufacturer in Hawaii that will make it for you and go crazy... You might not be wealthy but you would be able to live in Hawaii with a Uke in hand

Lori
05-13-2009, 06:13 AM
A lot of good ideas here. I would just add, if you have an opportunity to be an assistant or entry level worker in your chosen field, try it out before committing all that schooling to one specialty. Since you have mentioned sales and marketing... have you worked in a music store as a junior sales person? Just get your foot in the door and see what it's like on a day to day basis. Look at each person's role in the business, and ask yourself, do I want to do his job? Do you want to be an owner of a store, a manager, a floor salesman, music teacher (some stores give lessons) or the manufacturer's rep. If you could just spend a few days to a week in the environment, you would get a better idea what you like and don't like. Even if you offer to work for free for a week to get the experience, it would be worth it.

If performing and teaching are your passions, maybe music therapy would be a good area for you to check out. You could try it out by volunteering free uke lessons. You might have to get a few extra ukes, but it could be rewarding.

Lori

nikolo727
05-13-2009, 02:41 PM
Thanks everyone for the imput. Ukulele or not, I know my skills are with people, so selling and managing is my ultimate goal. I will have a talk with ken now that I think of it. Im not looking to get rich, just to be happy and able to support a family(someday lol) I think being a floor salesman, coporate salesman, or even being a marketer like ken, is what im looking for. can anyone give more info on these types??

Oh and I have looked into musical therapy, I will continue looking that up.

Thanks everyone and keep the ideas coming!!!

:D

Tanizaki
05-13-2009, 03:11 PM
1) Don't pick your career by subject area - pick it by the skills you enjoy putting to use. 'Ukulele' is not a skill or action, it's a noun. Being a ukulele salesperson or a ukulele craftsman are two very different careers. What are the specific skills you want to spend most of your life exercising? Again, focus on the verbs not the nouns. Pick a career that allows you to do what you do best every single day.

2) Be very wary of tournament professions. Tournament professions are jobs where 10,000 people compete for only one spot. The person at the top makes a million, and everyone else starves. Acting is a tournament profession. Writing fiction is a tournament profession. Being an olympic athlete is a tournament profession. And, yes, ukulele playing is a tournment profession. If you embark down this road, make sure you have either amazing talent, rich parents, or an incredibly thick skin for suffering and angst. (And preferably all three.) The weird thing about these professions is that everyone looks at the top of the pyramid and somehow just ignores all the many many people who failed trying to march to the top.

3) Be decisive. The most 'successfull' people I know are not the smartest people I know but the most decisive: they made a decision and stuck with it. I've been a little shocked at the type of success someone can produce from true dedication, stamina and focus over many years.

4) Imagine yourself as a mediocrity. (Really!) Too many people imagine themselves as super successfull when they choose a career. There is a whole generation of lawyers who choose their career while watching LA Law who now spend their entire professional lives reading mind numbing contracts and wills all day long and they hate what they do. When you imagine yourself as a crazy success every career seems amazing. But only some careers still sound cool if your'e just ok at it. If your career choice still sounds ok even without tremendous success, that's a good hint that it's a good choice for you. (In other words, that's a sign you enjoy the profession as an end in itself and not just as a means to something else like money or fame.)

Yes, far more than what you asked for... my apologies.

Best and most realistic advice in the thread.

Absent some outrageous fortune, you will probably not make your living at your hobby. There is a reason it is called "work". I recommend developing your skills in college and possibly graduate school tailored to a career that works for you. As for me, I went to law school, not because LA Law was cool. I just wanted to make a lot of money. As an aside, I don't understand people who say "I don't want to get rich". Why? What's wrong with getting (and staying) rich?

As GreyPoupon said, ukulele is a noun, not a job. Imagine someone asking, "I want a job in food. What should I do?" Well, there are a lot more bus boys than there are Gordon Ramseys.

Also, to make a bit of a point, what have you done to explore this topic besides starting this thread?

Ukulele JJ
05-13-2009, 05:20 PM
Be very wary of tournament professions. Tournament professions are jobs where 10,000 people compete for only one spot. The person at the top makes a million, and everyone else starves. Acting is a tournament profession. Writing fiction is a tournament profession. Being an olympic athlete is a tournament profession. And, yes, ukulele playing is a tournment profession. If you embark down this road, make sure you have either amazing tal


Good point. But some of those professions I'd call "lottery" professions instead.

See, "tournament" implies that the person who is the best will come out on top. Being an olympic athlete certainly qualifies.

But acting? Writing fiction? Creating any kind of music? None of those fields are meritocracies, unfortunately.

There are plenty of people making a killing in movies, music, and books who have little (if any) talent. And there are those who could act/play/sing/write circles around those people, but who are languishing in obscurity.

Which is not to say that any of those fields aren't worthwhile endeavors. They absolutely are. But career-wise, they're not exactly a basket I'd put all my eggs in.

JJ

smgold101
05-13-2009, 05:59 PM
hmmm you could open your own music studio. Its not very far fetched and by music studio i mean like where you hire others to give lessons for all different instruments maybe even voice and dance? Private lessons cost so much money so if you could get all of it then just pay your employees you could do pretty good. and of course you can teach ukulele and save money! and at the same time sell musical instruments and such from your studio. Good luck! also do you know where your going to college yet? I'm nosy lol
Good Luck!
-Seth

Tanizaki
05-14-2009, 06:57 AM
There are plenty of people making a killing in movies, music, and books who have little (if any) talent. And there are those who could act/play/sing/write circles around those people, but who are languishing in obscurity.

I see this argument all the time in the context of science, where someone can't get published or convince anyone that he's invented a perpetual motion gadget or a car that runs off water. It's a lot easier to level fire at "the system" than to engage in serious self-evaluation.

I think the burden rests upon such people to explain why they are languishing in obscurity if they are such talents. Being unlucky or the victim of a conspiracy are not good explanations. You can act circles around Joe Box Office Draw? Fine, then tell me why you aren't.

Ukulele JJ
05-14-2009, 10:06 AM
I think the burden rests upon such people to explain why they are languishing in obscurity if they are such talents. Being unlucky or the victim of a conspiracy are not good explanations.

Very true. You do have to avoid falling into the "victim" trap.

But the plain fact is that, on the whole, artistic talent is simply not the main criterion the consuming public uses to decide what music they buy, what books they read, or what movies they watch.

JJ

Ahnko Honu
05-14-2009, 10:20 AM
I've always been a builder and wood worker, love working with my hands, would love to expand my horizons with a luthier course at Hanalima. How are you with your hands Nick? Do you have an artistic side that may blossom with a similar course. I'm guessing it difficult to become rich financially as a small scale luthier but I think you'd become rich in many other ways. :shaka:

JKoval
05-14-2009, 11:56 AM
This thread has gotten me thinking... I'm going into college next year... Hmmm...

nikolo727
05-14-2009, 01:33 PM
Best and most realistic advice in the thread.

Absent some outrageous fortune, you will probably not make your living at your hobby. There is a reason it is called "work". I recommend developing your skills in college and possibly graduate school tailored to a career that works for you. As for me, I went to law school, not because LA Law was cool. I just wanted to make a lot of money. As an aside, I don't understand people who say "I don't want to get rich". Why? What's wrong with getting (and staying) rich?

As GreyPoupon said, ukulele is a noun, not a job. Imagine someone asking, "I want a job in food. What should I do?" Well, there are a lot more bus boys than there are Gordon Ramseys.

Also, to make a bit of a point, what have you done to explore this topic besides starting this thread?

Tanizaki.

1. I dont want to be rich. I dont need money to be happy. Most people who end up getting rich turn into jerks. People who turn rich usually develop thick heads and do stupid things in life. I speak this from seeing people go down the wrong path concerning a lot of money.

2. I am sorry that my english is not up to par with you. I meant: I would like to have a job that is related to doing something with a ukulele.

3. Everyone comes here asking questions. I thought a great place to talk about a job "concerning" ukuleles is on a UKULELE FORUM. I highly value the opinion of MOST people on this forum, so yes I think I will come here to ask questions, however "weird" you think they are.

4. Lawyers lie for a living so no i think i will take my chances elsewhere.

5. doing what you love for a living isnt impossible. It takes dedication to get to that point but nothing is impossible.

6. Getting a degree in business and sales management isnt exactly a one way education. There are limitless job possibilities with that education. Implying that I would like to use said education, to do something "concerning" ukulele, isnt a bad idea or thought at all imo.

7. The next time you feel like posting, take the "jerk" away from your typing. I came looking for ideas not critisism.


just to clear things up I think that the idea for a music studio is a great idea.

also Ahnko Honu, I think I will look more into being a luthier. Maybe I could do that part time or on the side of my actual job. I am pretty good with my hands and artistic ability runs in my family. (my mom is a quilter)

Thanks everyone for your advice and thoughts, however rude they may be.

josuegroundhog
05-14-2009, 01:42 PM
Someone once told me to think of your two favorite things in life.

Make a career out of your second favorite. Keep your favorite to yourself.

You will never grow tired, bitter, cynical, or angry of your favorite.

Tanizaki
05-14-2009, 05:21 PM
Tanizaki.

1. I dont want to be rich. I dont need money to be happy. Most people who end up getting rich turn into jerks. People who turn rich usually develop thick heads and do stupid things in life. I speak this from seeing people go down the wrong path concerning a lot of money.
Money may not buy happiness, but poverty buys nothing.


3. Everyone comes here asking questions. I thought a great place to talk about a job "concerning" ukuleles is on a UKULELE FORUM. I highly value the opinion of MOST people on this forum, so yes I think I will come here to ask questions, however "weird" you think they are.
I don't understand what you are responding to here. You certainly aren't responding to my question that asked what else you've done to achieve your dream.


4. Lawyers lie for a living so no i think i will take my chances elsewhere.
How am I supposed to respond to this? Is this statement intended to make people respect you more or less? I suppose my witty retort would be that most people lie for free.


5. doing what you love for a living isnt impossible. It takes dedication to get to that point but nothing is impossible.
Actually, of all conceivable things, all but a tiny fraction are impossible. You will never create matter, fly by flapping your wings, or walk on water.


6. Getting a degree in business and sales management isnt exactly a one way education. There are limitless job possibilities with that education. Implying that I would like to use said education, to do something "concerning" ukulele, isnt a bad idea or thought at all imo.
There is nothing wrong with a business degree.


7. The next time you feel like posting, take the "jerk" away from your typing. I came looking for ideas not critisism.
In other words, you want to be patted on the head and not be told anything that might take you out of your comfort zone. PROTIP: advice sometimes takes the form of criticism.

I am frankly taken aback that my post, which was perfectly polite and echoed another poster's comments, elicited such a discourteous reply. You came here asking for advice, which is fine. However, I don't understand people who ask for advice and then get angry when they receive advice that contradicts their preconceived notions or suggests that they face failure.

megamatt
05-14-2009, 06:00 PM
I wouldn't recommend being a luthier if you don't really want it. It's a very meticulous and unforgiving job, everything has to be done just so, and if you don't have that ocd drive to make everything perfect you'll probably not be really successful at it.

I don't know how successful (understanding you aren't aiming to "get rich") you could be as a ukulele salesman either. It's quite niche and there probably isn't a ton of room in the marketplace for it. If you're willing to do something and be pretty low income that's fine, but it'll be tough to start a family.

The negatives being said my personal opinion is that if you have true passion for something by all means go for it. When you're at the end of your life it's always worse to wonder what could have been rather than know you gave it your best and it didn't pan out.

Spooner
05-14-2009, 06:18 PM
If you're playing your ukulele, you won't have a free hand to type with.

:shaka:

smgold101
05-14-2009, 08:08 PM
What jobs in the ukulele field are available with those degrees??


Money may not buy happiness, but poverty buys nothing.

I am frankly taken aback that my post, which was perfectly polite and echoed another poster's comments, elicited such a discourteous reply. You came here asking for advice, which is fine. However, I don't understand people who ask for advice and then get angry when they receive advice that contradicts their preconceived notions or suggests that they face failure.

Actually you are wrong. Your post did not answer his question. If you read what he was asking he asks what jobs in the ukulele field are available. He did not ask hey do you think I should do this or Hey whats your opinion on this. He asked what kind of jobs can i have that include ukulele.and "Money may not buy happiness, but poverty buys nothing" you being a Law student should no these dont make any sense together. If it was an argument you were trying to make to prove your point being rich is the best you can not assume that with your argument. A being Money may not buy happiness has nothing to do with being in poverty buys nothing. I mean Its been a while since i took philosophy dealing with arguments but i do know that, that statement didnt really make sense. Also he never said he wanted to be a bum and do nothing the rest of his life. He said he wanted to do something with ukuleles therefore hopefully poverty wont happen anyways. MGM, i dont actually know, but im assuming he isn't a millionaire but im also assuming he gets by just fine and i'm sure there are many more out there like that. Nick, dont listen to that, do what you enjoy for the rest of your life. Why be miserable with what you do your entire work, just to be rich. Do something you enjoy and get steadily. You will be much happier :D And i think the music studio is a cool idea too haha look into entrepreneurship, you might find it interesting as a major.

dnewton2
05-15-2009, 01:44 AM
I am going to have to say Tanizaki has a vaild point. I personally believe critical advice is way better than any othe advice. I didn't really see anything rude about his original response to the thread. There is a reason they call it work. But that is no reason you can't find a job you love.

That said no matter what you chose to do it will not be easy. To incorporate something you love into a profession is pretty challenging unless you are extremly talented or put in you dues, which could take many many years at the "bottom".

Whatever you chose to pursue have a plan to fall back on, which it looks like you do going to get a degree.

carpekd
05-15-2009, 02:19 AM
I think it's pretty simple. They're really only 5 choices when it comes to ukulele jobs:

sell them, make them, promote them, play them, or teach them

go from there...

GreyPoupon
05-15-2009, 02:11 PM
One thing I hate about internet forums is how it is sooo easy to read evil intent in someone's words when it was never intended.

nikolo727
05-16-2009, 08:22 AM
Actually you are wrong. Your post did not answer his question. If you read what he was asking he asks what jobs in the ukulele field are available. He did not ask hey do you think I should do this or Hey whats your opinion on this. He asked what kind of jobs can i have that include ukulele.and "Money may not buy happiness, but poverty buys nothing" you being a Law student should no these dont make any sense together. If it was an argument you were trying to make to prove your point being rich is the best you can not assume that with your argument. A being Money may not buy happiness has nothing to do with being in poverty buys nothing. I mean Its been a while since i took philosophy dealing with arguments but i do know that, that statement didnt really make sense. Also he never said he wanted to be a bum and do nothing the rest of his life. He said he wanted to do something with ukuleles therefore hopefully poverty wont happen anyways. MGM, i dont actually know, but im assuming he isn't a millionaire but im also assuming he gets by just fine and i'm sure there are many more out there like that. Nick, dont listen to that, do what you enjoy for the rest of your life. Why be miserable with what you do your entire work, just to be rich. Do something you enjoy and get steadily. You will be much happier :D And i think the music studio is a cool idea too haha look into entrepreneurship, you might find it interesting as a major.



Thats a will do thank you broh.

nikolo727
05-16-2009, 08:25 AM
One thing I hate about internet forums is how it is sooo easy to read evil intent in someone's words when it was never intended.

Hmm. I get your point but that isnt at all my fault. Its hard to tell someones expression from the words they type. :p

nikolo727
05-16-2009, 08:44 AM
How am I supposed to respond to this? Is this statement intended to make people respect you more or less? I suppose my witty retort would be that most people lie for free.

I do not care what people think of me, least of all people who ive just met on the internet.



Actually, of all conceivable things, all but a tiny fraction are impossible. You will never create matter, fly by flapping your wings, or walk on water.


Well there was this one guy.....Now im not saying I am jesus or could walk on water, but in my belief nothing is impossible with the right faith. agree or dissagree, it doesnt matter to me.




In other words, you want to be patted on the head and not be told anything that might take you out of your comfort zone. PROTIP: advice sometimes takes the form of criticism.

Not at all. But I think the best type of advice doesnt come from criticism, but comes from talking to a person on even terms, not asking questions that contradict what other people say. How you give advice is one of the important factors that people use to judge whether to respect you or not.




I am frankly taken aback that my post, which was perfectly polite and echoed another poster's comments, elicited such a discourteous reply. You came here asking for advice, which is fine. However, I don't understand people who ask for advice and then get angry when they receive advice that contradicts their preconceived notions or suggests that they face failure.

So you are suggesting that making a life with something that has to do with ukuleles is a path that faces failure?
Thats like saying MGM is a failure, that Jake Shimabukuro is a failure, or even the admins of this website are failures. And I know they are not at all. They love doing what do for a living and they are making a good living out of it. How could I face failure in this world with a college degree in business or sales? I simply said that I would like to use that degree to work in the music field, primarily around the ukulele field. I dont think thats a terrible question at all.


As for this whole thing. I am not angry anymore. I am not going to apologize because frankly, to me, your response did seem rude. Then again from what I previously posted, it is hard to tell people emotions over the internet. So there is the possibility that I am completely wrong. But that is not for us to decide. That is up to the big man upstairs that can walk on water.I am not going to hold a grudge on you for anything that you have said, but I will defend my opinion.

nikolo727
05-16-2009, 08:45 AM
Now im going to ask an admin to close this thread. I really dont want any arguing to continue. The only thing that I regret was getting angry and starting this thing. So please let us just continue on our lives and forget this stupid argument.

Ahnko Honu
05-16-2009, 08:55 AM
Nick I know you will succeed in whatever you choose to do in life, and by success I do not mean monetary wealth but happiness because you have your head together and you have a good heart. Best wishes on all you future endeavors. :shaka:

nikolo727
05-16-2009, 09:00 AM
Thank you sir!! hopefully my head will stick in that place in the years to come, and I know with this forum it will.

bt93
05-16-2009, 09:04 AM
you should work at guitar center or a local music store tht sells ukes

Ukulele JJ
05-16-2009, 11:43 AM
you should work at guitar center or a local music store tht sells ukes

Well we've already determined that he has his head together and his heart in the right place.

So that rules out working at Guitar Center.

:p

JJ

nikolo727
05-16-2009, 01:22 PM
Well we've already determined that he has his head together and his heart in the right place.

So that rules out working at Guitar Center.

:p

JJ




LOL.


:rotfl:
:rotfl:
:rotfl:

bt93
05-16-2009, 03:27 PM
i mean a music store or somewhere with ukes

koalohapaul
05-16-2009, 05:56 PM
I don't know how old you are, but it seems like you're still young. If something related to ukulele is your passion, pursue it. You really don't know what doors will open up unless you try.

You may end up in a place where you want to be - OR - you'll discover that you want to do something else.

I didn't ever plan on building ukulele for a living, but it has become my life and my passion. It did take a lot of long hours, hard work, and sacrifice to build our company, though. The road never was and still isn't easy, but I love doing what I do at the end of the day.

The reality is that you can't predict what you'll be doing or where you'll end up. I thought I was going to be a doctor. I would say my current career path is a little off track. No one can tell you what you want to do. Unfortunately, sometimes you don't get to choose, because life in the modern world requires money to pay bills. A lot of people aren't willing to sacrifice their lifestyle in order to pursue their dream. Many choose the route of a boring, but secure job. Others remain poor till the day they die, doing what they love doing. A select few become successful doing what they love doing.

In the end, it's all up to you. Although Tanizaki's responses may have come off bruntly, he did pose a different perspective from the "Go for it" mentality. Whether you agree with him or not, many of his points are valid and I can completely understand where he's coming from. On the other hand, I dropped out of college to work with my family and got flack for it from all my relatives and family friends. After years of hard work, I did succeed, in both providing for my family and loving what I do. I haven't heard a "what if" or "go back to school" scenario from them in years.

The other part of success is plain luck. Being in the right time at the right place with the right idea is absolutely not something you can control. Try as you might, you may end up failing at what you do many, many times. Again, it's up to you and your passion to pursue what you believe in to stick with it until you succeed, or quit and find something else. You'll never know until you try.

UkuLeLesReggAe
05-16-2009, 06:06 PM
^ perfect answer! case closed :D

haolejohn
05-26-2009, 03:46 PM
Here's my advise to you. Keep playing the uke and then get your bachelors in early childhood education and teach fifth grade. Why?

1.Recession proof job (Well more secure than most)
2. kids are easily influenced and you can start a whole generation off with the right instrument.
3. You get summers off to visit Hawai'i for a month and tour ukulele shops and play on the beach every morning after your morning run.
4. If your single you'll probally be the only guy working with 50 plus women.