PDA

View Full Version : crack repair - possible and how much will it cost? (roundabout)



zivilars
06-30-2018, 06:50 AM
Hi everybody,

a few years ago, I accidentally damaged my Honu Rope Tenor in two spots (see attached pictures) – there's a bigger crack (picture 1) and a lot more minor one (picture 2):

https://www.dropbox.com/s/tuh163gi2j1kfqr/crack%201.JPG?dl=0

https://www.dropbox.com/s/pmjpahcj6hjaxpu/crack%202.JPG?dl=0

Wasn't too happy about it when it happened, of course, but didn't mind living with it all the years (looks much worse if photographed such close, you probably wouldn't spot it if not specifically checking the body). Still will be fine just living with it if a repair is too expensive – however, I am finally considering to bring it to a luthier. As I don't have any clue how a repair would take place and how difficult it is, I would be very grateful for a professional opinion here: Is such a crack easy and (quality wise) good enough to repair that you would recommend bringing the ukulele to a luthier? I'd probably invest up to $100 max for a repair if it really looks like new after that. The main crack is the important one - the others one is such superficial that I could leave it like it is if this adds significantly to the cost.

I always figured that it would be quite complex to repair such a crack because of also having to do a new finish, but after reading a bit about repairing cracks in the Internet and here on the forum, I'm now hoping that a repair would be cheap enough to be worthy brining the Honu Rope to a luthier.

Any suggestion if recommended or not would be great. Thanks in advance!

BlackBearUkes
06-30-2018, 07:20 AM
You don't mention where on the uke the cracks are, but I would guess the lower bout area. Problem is, stabilizing the cracks from the inside so the crack doesn't open up any further. It would be hard to get inside, but not impossible. Since the cracks look tight, getting glue in there from the outside could be problematic, not to mention that finish which looks like a poly type? A good repair will be at least $100 if not more. The cracks can be repaired, but not the finish if it is poly (plastic).


Hi everybody,

a few years ago, I accidentally damaged my Honu Rope Tenor in two spots (see attached pictures) – there's a bigger crack (picture 1) and a lot more minor one (picture 2):

https://www.dropbox.com/s/tuh163gi2j1kfqr/crack%201.JPG?dl=0

https://www.dropbox.com/s/pmjpahcj6hjaxpu/crack%202.JPG?dl=0

Wasn't too happy about it when it happened, of course, but didn't mind living with it all the years (looks much worse if photographed such close, you probably wouldn't spot it if not specifically checking the body). Still will be fine just living with it if a repair is too expensive – however, I am finally considering to bring it to a luthier. As I don't have any clue how a repair would take place and how difficult it is, I would be very grateful for a professional opinion here: Is such a crack easy and (quality wise) good enough to repair that you would recommend bringing the ukulele to a luthier? I'd probably invest up to $100 max for a repair if it really looks like new after that. The main crack is the important one - the others one is such superficial that I could leave it like it is if this adds significantly to the cost.

I always figured that it would be quite complex to repair such a crack because of also having to do a new finish, but after reading a bit about repairing cracks in the Internet and here on the forum, I'm now hoping that a repair would be cheap enough to be worthy brining the Honu Rope to a luthier.

Any suggestion if recommended or not would be great. Thanks in advance!

zivilars
06-30-2018, 07:35 AM
Thanks a lot for the answer, really appreciated. Yes, the main crack is in the lower area, just about where the body starts going up to the "waist". The crack probably is too tight to put glue through it indeed (although there is a very small slit) – it maybe would have to be done through the soundhole.

Made two additional photos with a better camera:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/ho9o07paero3sm7/crack%203.JPG?dl=0

https://www.dropbox.com/s/efb53twgj5yngtl/crack%204.JPG?dl=0

Don't know exactly what exactly finish is called, to be honest - I guess it is high gloss? We are talking about this model:

https://www.southernukulelestore.co.uk/big-island-honu-h-krp-tr-all-solid-koa-rope-tenor-ukulele-with-case/

For more than $100, as mentioned, I'd probably leave it as it is – however, your answer made me a bit nervous that the crack will get bigger. On the other side, the crack already is years old and I haven't discovered it getting any worse by "falling" into the inside. (Not that I specifically monitored it, but this is what I think.)

Can I just leave it as it is? Or should I have it repaired even if it is more than $100?

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
06-30-2018, 08:43 AM
The wood can be glued with hot hide glue, titebond, epoxy or ca....depending on certain factors. Choosing the best glue for the job is up to the person you take it too.

The poly finish can be fairly nicely repaired (but not made invisible) with layers of ca glue.

zivilars
06-30-2018, 08:53 AM
Thanks for the info. Will probably take the ukulele to a luthier then (hopefully I find a good one!) and ask what they can do and how much it will cost.

Michael N.
06-30-2018, 10:59 AM
That's a bit more than a crack that follows the grain. There's breakage across the grain. Of course it can be repaired but will also need reinforcing from the inside. I wouldn't touch it for anywhere near $100 (simply not worth the hassle) but you might be lucky and find someone who's competent enough to do a good job at that price.

zivilars
06-30-2018, 11:11 AM
In this case, I'll probably keep the ukulele as it is – as mentioned, I would like it better without the crack(s), of course, but paying more than $100 (which surely is more than justified to repair a more complicated crack than I hoped it would be) simply wouldn't be worth it. In this case (if I get too anal having ALL my ukuleles in perfect condition - the Honu Rope is the only damaged one), I may even consider consider the cracked ukulele for a significantly lower price because of its condition and buy back somewhere else the same model as a used, "uncracked" one, paying the premium between both sums.

sequoia
07-01-2018, 08:20 AM
I am not a professional luthier or repair person, but I would have two ideas:

1: Live with it. It gives the instrument "character".

2: Do a drop-fill with sawdust and CA glue. Video below demonstrates the technique. Note that any structural issues (if any in this case) need to be addressed prior to crack repair. Thank you Robbie O'Brian!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cxwLGbVui8k

zivilars
07-01-2018, 08:43 AM
Thanks for the video – I'll consider it, but probably won't dare - even with a good instruction and easy procedure - to try to fix my ukulele by myself (have two left hands). I'll probably live with it and you are correct about the character – best proof in this case is always Willie Nelsons guitar ... :)

https://www.reddit.com/r/pics/comments/5nei8s/willie_nelsons_guitar_after_48_years_of_use/

mmn
07-01-2018, 10:42 PM
If it's stable then I wouldn't mess with it. If it's not, then that needs to be addressed. You might be $100 or less for that.

Refinishing is purely cosmetic and would probably put you over your budget.

jhnmdahl
07-02-2018, 06:52 AM
There's a lot of ground between looking perfect again and stabilizing the instrument while making it look better (if not perfect). It looks like a polyurethane finish, which isn't easy to spot retouch, but a good luthier with some CA glue (thin superglue) could likely improve things for your budget if you're interested in significantly better but not perfect.

John

zivilars
07-02-2018, 07:03 AM
Thanks for the input. Found a luthier near me in my city – can't hurt to show him the ukulele and ask for what he can do for what price, I guess. Thanks for the input to all of you!

hoosierhiver
07-02-2018, 07:06 AM
If we knew where you lived, maybe we could recommend a place to get it repaired.

Jerryc41
07-02-2018, 07:09 AM
That's a beauty. If it were mine, I would search out luthiers and see what they say. You want it done right. If it were a cheapie, I'd put a patch on the inside just to keep it from getting worse and to add some strength.

Let us know how this works out.

zivilars
07-02-2018, 07:12 AM
If we knew where you lived, maybe we could recommend a place to get it repaired.

I am based in Hamburg, Germany, so a recommendation will probably get difficult. I have a small luthier store for guitars and violins near me – I don't know anything about their reputation, but at the moment, they would probably my first choice to ask what can be done at which costs.