PDA

View Full Version : Gone Fishin' Fluorocarbon Strings ?



Jim Hanks
08-05-2018, 04:56 AM
With the unfortunate passing of Dirk and Southcoast Strings, some have asked about alternatives. I may have found one, but I can't find any reviews.
https://www.bytowninstruments.com/products/gone-fishin-fluorocarbon-ukulele-strings

Just from the gauges, the standard offerings are almost identical to those provided by Living Water. I really have to question some of the less common offerings though - how can the same 0.91mm work as low G tenor and low D guitalele for example.

The other unique thing here is the option to order "by the inch" in any of the 9 string gauges. If the strings are good, this would provide for a lot of experimentation with tunings and tensions. So we might be able to find formulas similar to what Dirk found.

Anybody tried these?

The other unknown here is whether they ship to U.S. as they are in Canada. If there is someone in the U.S. doing something similar, I haven't found it.

UkerDanno
08-05-2018, 06:14 AM
Sorry to hear about Dirk, never used Southcoast Strings, but fluorocarbon comes in many different formulas and densities, so you can't just compare any gauge to another.

DownUpDave
08-05-2018, 07:08 AM
Thanks for that Jim. They are Canadian so I have dealt with them and I played with a bunch of them at a local Uke Festival.

FWIW Strings by Mail carries a large selection of individual floro strings in a wide array of diameters from both Savarez and Pyramid. They can be found in the classical guitar string category.

dparis007
08-05-2018, 08:30 AM
I have them on my Koaloha Super Concert. They work great and have less tension than Oasis strings.

Jim Hanks
08-05-2018, 09:08 AM
fluorocarbon comes in many different formulas and densities, so you can't just compare any gauge to another.
I'm aware of that. I just found it interesting that both this site and LW list their gauges and for all the normal 4 strings sets, they happen to be the same - except for the unwound low D baritone is slightly different. I think there were a couple of gauges on the Bytown site not listed in the normal LW sets, though Ken may use a few others for custom sets.


Thanks for that Jim. They are Canadian so I have dealt with them and I played with a bunch of them at a local Uke Festival.
I got an email back from Mark Rogers at Bytown and they do ship to the US, so I'll probably have to give them a try.


FWIW Strings by Mail carries a large selection of individual floro strings in a wide array of diameters from both Savarez and Pyramid. They can be found in the classical guitar string category.
Ooh, did not know that. Thanks!


I have them on my Koaloha Super Concert. They work great and have less tension than Oasis strings.
Good to know!

merlin666
02-27-2019, 06:13 AM
I just came across them though unfortunately I am all strung up well at the moment. But if anyone else can report on them, in particular the Low-G and 6-string sets, then please share your experience.

Ukecaster
02-27-2019, 08:57 AM
He mentions Seaguar on his website, but doesn't say if these strings are Seaguar.

glennerd
02-27-2019, 09:12 AM
- how can the same 0.91mm work as low G tenor and low D guitalele for example.



I read it that low G tenor is the same as Low A guitalele (Tenor scale), just one step up. Low D guitalele matches on baritone scale.

Thanks for pointing us to these. I like my fluoro. :D

Pat Eaton
02-27-2019, 09:57 AM
You will find Mark is a great guy to deal with. I met him a couple of years ago when I started building ukuleles. I needed some parts and he invited me to his home in Ottawa to look at his stock. I have not bough strings from him as of yet.

glennerd
02-27-2019, 11:28 AM
Just from the gauges, the standard offerings are almost identical to those provided by Living Water. I really have to question some of the less common offerings though - how can the same 0.91mm work as low G tenor and low D guitalele for example.

.

I just noticed the G6 Baritone strings appear to be mislabeled GCEA instead of DGBE

Swamp Yankee
02-27-2019, 12:15 PM
He mentions Seaguar on his website, but doesn't say if these strings are Seaguar.

the diameters he cites and the DSF bit match Seaguar specs, mostly for the Blue Label ... but it appears he mixes in a few strings from the Fluoro Premier line... namely the .57 mm A string in the tenors, and the non-wound .91mm in the baritone set.

Basically, 30,40,50 & 60 pound tests Blue Label would cover sopranos and concerts ...which, IIRC, is what Baz came up with as well.

70sSanO
02-28-2019, 05:28 AM
Interesting site that pretty much sells Seaguar strings as ukulele sets. Being able to buy an assortment of individual strings to test is a nice approach. I can say that there are slight differences between Blue Label and Premier. I have about 8 rolls of Seaguar leader. The Premier is more flexible and seems to stretch more, which ultimately makes the string a little thinner, (digital caliper wise, that is). But between the two there are a lot of mix-n-match possibilities.

For me a good C string is the toughest to dial in. One that doesnít boom or thud. While I havenít picked up all sizes available, it is possible to get .660mm, .700mm, .740mm, .780mm, and .810mm for just a C string. There is a .620mm in both Blue Label and Premier. One day Iíll pick up that size in both and see if there are any differences. It is really about the sound after a string stretches and settles in.

For me it is more a matter of convenience of having whatever diameters available to swap out/replace and not have to try to find particular ukulele strings locally, (which never works), or having to order them. While it does cost a bit more, it is cheaper in the long run if someone has a number of ukuleles.

John

Ukecaster
02-28-2019, 05:46 AM
From my calculations, using Amazon Seaguar Blue prices, it looks like sets of soprano strings using Seaguar spools would cost cost about $1.90 each, yielding 39 sets from (4) 25 yard spools (30/40/50/60 lb). Tenor sets would be $3.27 each, yielding 29 sets. Of course, there are common strings in both sets, so you could use the same Seaguar 40/50/60 for both soprano and tenor, just getting an 80 lb spool for the tenor C string. I haven't done it yet, but might; so far I just have a 30 lb spool for soprano A strings.

glennerd
02-28-2019, 08:49 AM
From my calculations, using Amazon Seaguar Blue prices, it looks like sets of soprano strings using Seaguar spools would cost cost about $1.90 each, yielding 39 sets from (4) 25 yard spools (30/40/50/60 lb). Tenor sets would be $3.27 each, yielding 29 sets. Of course, there are common strings in both sets, so you could use the same Seaguar 40/50/60 for both soprano and tenor, just getting an 80 lb spool for the tenor C string. I haven't done it yet, but might; so far I just have a 30 lb spool for soprano A strings.

It's a fun little math exercise. In my stingy mind, I'd thread them through the peg first, tie them to the bridge (not sure if the rest works IRL, but) wind them and then cut them. I figure with a slotted bridge I'd get at least an extra set over a tie bar bridge, and maybe 50 sets for the G and A strings (soprano, slotted). Why would I bother when it's so cheap and how long it would take me to go through a reel? Well, you know, the challenge of how many sets I could get. What am I going to do though when I run out of C & E before G & A? :confused:

Swamp Yankee
02-28-2019, 08:57 AM
It would be more difficult for me to calculate prices per set because I'd be using it to make tapered flyfishing leaders too. :D I

Now I tend to use regular Ande nylon monofilament for most of the leader and save the Seaguar Blue Label for the tippet.. being the bit that ties to the fly.
I have a spool of 30lb. Blue Label already, as well as 10, 20, 25...
I have tried the Ande nylon... and the results were underwhelming.

70sSanO
02-28-2019, 07:02 PM
I’be thought about shelf life and I know cool dark (no uv rays) is recommended for line. But it seems that an individual string tension of 10/12lbs probably won’t be an issue using 40/60lb test over time, especially stored away in a shoe box away from light. I fon’t Know, but if I’m still around in 20 years, I’ll let you know... lol!

John

glennerd
03-01-2019, 06:40 PM
Using the fishing line is always an option.
A major problem for individuals is that a roll of line makes a lot of string sets and you are stuck with them once you buy the roll of line. Fishing line can have a shelf life and also you are likely to want to try other string sets, so buying 20 years supply is not a good idea for everyone.
It is a different issue if you support a large group of ukuleles, like a school or a large group. Then it makes good sense to buy in bulk because you are going use the strings before the shelf life expires. If you are associated with a music shop (or a fishing shop) that supports a local uke group, the shop can buy in the line and process it into packets as a service for the group members, and charge a suitable price to recover the costs. Possibly a music school could do the same thing. Supporting a group of even 100 ukuleles with string sets may be something that can fit into shop or music school activities, and it can save the customers some money and inconvenience. Perhaps this is the story of Bytown Gone Fishin Strings?

A good reality check there Bill. So what's your take on fluorocarbon shelf life. I just bought some Martin M600 strings from a guitar shop today and they were in paperboard box packaging, which is at least two package styles ago. Not sure what vintage that would make them, but I'm guessing more than 5 years old. I'll see how they hold up once I restring my uke.

Ukecaster
03-02-2019, 04:42 AM
I was comparing the Gone Fishin' specs of reentrant soprano and tenor sets, and it looks like the only different size string is a larger A string on the tenor set. That seems strange, as I'd expect more, if not all strings to be fatter on the tenor set. Any comments?

115842

Swamp Yankee
03-02-2019, 05:08 AM
since he's limited to what Seaguar makes, his only option for strings that are slightly different in size is to mix the Blue Label with the Premier, or another of Seaguar's offerings. Perhaps they don't mix well, so he has limited the Premier to one string in the tenor and one in the baritone.

70sSanO
03-02-2019, 05:58 AM
As Bill1 said, a lot of it has to do with storage. If you really want to get an idea or fluorocarbon shelf life, google it and check out fishing forums.

John

Swamp Yankee
03-02-2019, 06:23 AM
I have a box of spools of fluorocarbon (and nylon) leader material. Kept on its original spool in a box out of sunlight in a cool place ... my guess is that it lasts 7-10 years easily... maybe longer. Out in the open air, like in smaller diameters spooled onto fishing reels, I change it every season.
I do have some spools of fluorocarbon leader material that date from the late 90s. They don't show any visible signs of decay, no powder, etc. but I'm not sure they'd hold the strain for which they were rated. I'd use them for fishing but they're Berkely "Vanish" which, even when new, was horrible stuff.

glennerd
03-02-2019, 02:48 PM
Good info. The old ones I bought would have sat in a guitar shop, so controlled humidity and temperature. The C string looks good, but the GEA strings are cloudy looking, kind of halfway to looking like nylon. They sound okay and I only bought one set, so not like I bought four reels. Being buying from Strings by Mail lately, so I'll likely go back to them.