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Pete Howlett
09-23-2018, 02:16 PM
This is the latest departure from the norm (well they've been doing it a few years now) by the guitar making crowd. Anyone do it here?

Kekani
09-23-2018, 07:35 PM
Been doing it for a while, mostly because I have a CF rod that sits proud, and into the fretboard. Oddly, I don't do the rod and fretboard glue up at the same time, so no real need to mix up epoxy.

That said, I was gluing block and lining today - since I had the hide glue out, just used that to glue the fretboards - first time. . .

mmn
09-24-2018, 05:02 AM
I never epoxy anything unless I expect to never have to remove it. Fret boards do not fit that criterion. I have removed a few fret boards to either replace or fix/plane a neck.

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
09-24-2018, 07:05 AM
I mostly use epoxy to glue the FB to the neck for the last 6 years- but I use titebond or HHG on the fingerboard tongue to glue the neck to the body (with a bolt).

It has no water to introduce curves into necks- having said that- i don't experience any of those problems when i glue on a FB with titebond or HHG when I use a 3/4" ply caul to keep it straight. I've seen some luthiers glue the FB on with only spring clamps on the edge with no caul- this would be a no no if using titebond or HHG- i'm not sure what glue they used but i would expect it to be epoxy.

Similar to what Kekani said above, I use the glue (Glue = epoxy, titebond or HHG) that i'm using at the time as they are all as good as each other.
I sometimes use epoxy because sometimes if im mixing up epoxy for some other job and some carbon fiber rods need glueing in, i'll do it then with the excess epoxy (without the fingerboard). But mostly I glue the CF rod and the FB on at the same time (with epoxy) as its two jobs in one.

You can get an epoxied FB off with heat- However it should be stated that if a uke (or guitar) FB needs to come off, something really bad has happened and dealing with epoxy is probably the least of one's worries.

What MMN said about having to plane a neck- that's a major geometry issue. Bad on a new instrument, and to be expected on an vintage instruments (i mean geometry issues in general from 100 years of string tension, not necessarily needing a planned fingerboard).

Allen
09-24-2018, 10:14 AM
I've been using Epoxy on fret board because I use a CF truss rod that is inlaid 4mm into the neck and 2mm into the fret board. All glued up at once. HHG to glue fret board to soundboard.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
09-25-2018, 07:31 AM
I don't the same as the others above for most of the same reasons.

Timbuck
10-04-2018, 06:18 AM
Having had problems in the past with gluing and leveling fret boards and trying to get perfection .:) i came across this thread on the Ozzie forum ANZLF with some good input from Rick Turner..here is a link http://www.anzlf.com/viewtopic.php?t=395

resoman
10-04-2018, 08:45 AM
I used to use Zpoxy but switched to Superbond epoxy a few years ago. I was able to get the FB's off with Zpoxy but haven't had to try the Superbond. It dries harder than a politician's heart!!

Timbuck
10-04-2018, 08:57 PM
Having had problems in the past with gluing and leveling fret boards and trying to get perfection .:) i came across this thread on the Ozzie forum ANZLF with some good input from Rick Turner..here is a link http://www.anzlf.com/viewtopic.php?t=395

The bit that interested me was how Rick was saying that he was against carving the neck after gluing on the fretboad due to stress being released by the carving away most of the material..and he removed the material first to within a couple of mm's then glued on the FB with epoxy...I have always removed most of the material first in the lathe, but I used water based tightbond and still got some slight bowing or sometimes twist..Sooo! I'll give the epoxy a try and let you know the results...I'm also interested in his method of double sided sticky tape and pins idea while carving.

Pete Howlett
10-05-2018, 12:47 PM
I use wood that is 20 years old so I tend not to get neck problems. I start with a 'jointed' billet and check for any movement as I profile the blank on the bandsaw. Any movement at this point will signal future problems. I think it starts with wood selection and using v very well seasoned and 'proved' wood.