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Edspyhill05
09-26-2018, 09:06 AM
Does anyone know of something called the “Theory Of Four” chord method? I did searches but nothing by that name is found. I’m assuming this method applies to guitars and all fretted instruments.

Thanks,

Ed T.

Jarmo_S
09-26-2018, 09:32 AM
While I don't know about what theory exactly, I am pretty sure it is related to the circle of fifths. Anticlockwise it is the circle of fourths.
https://music.stackexchange.com/questions/20167/circle-of-fourths-in-jazz

Edspyhill05
09-26-2018, 09:35 AM
While I don't know about what theory exactly, I am pretty sure it is related to the circle of fifths. Anticlockwise it is the circle of fourths.
https://music.stackexchange.com/questions/20167/circle-of-fourths-in-jazz

I think you are right. I didn’t make that connection until you mentioned it. Thanks,

Ed

Uncle Rod Higuchi
09-26-2018, 09:42 AM
might it refer to the sequence of chord forms? A (form) moved up a fret becomes Bb, moved up another fret becomes B;
then the C (form) moved up a fret becomes a C# or Db, then moved up one more fret becomes a D; and the F (form)
moved up becomes an F# or Gb, and moved up one more becomes a G... oh, wait, that's only 3 shapes instead of 4.

maybe it refers to something else :)

I hope this was helpful anyway,

OOPs, I forgot the progression to Eb and E, but you can figure it out :)

lisah2u
03-17-2019, 02:00 AM
I just attended a one hour class at taught by UncleZac on the "Theory of Four." This is a system he learned from his uncle and captured in his "ultimate chord inversion chart for ukulele which you can find on the magic fluke website https://www.magicfluke.com/product-p/zacultimatebari.htm (this is the baritone chart).

The idea is that for any key type (major, minor, etc.) there are four distinct visual shapes which represent chord inversions up the neck. So there are four "c" chord shapes (inversions) and as you go up by half steps (c#, d, e flat...) the same four shapes are repeated a half step up the fretboard.

Really cool system and the charts are definitely worth getting. And if you can a class from him, it's really valuable. I'm waiting for the glow of the-baritone-is-the-best-instrument-you-can-play to wear off. His enthusiasm is infectious.

Lisa


might it refer to the sequence of chord forms? A (form) moved up a fret becomes Bb, moved up another fret becomes B;
then the C (form) moved up a fret becomes a C# or Db, then moved up one more fret becomes a D; and the F (form)
moved up becomes an F# or Gb, and moved up one more becomes a G... oh, wait, that's only 3 shapes instead of 4.

maybe it refers to something else :)

I hope this was helpful anyway,

OOPs, I forgot the progression to Eb and E, but you can figure it out :)