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View Full Version : What to expect at a jam?



Rosendust
09-26-2018, 03:44 PM
Hey all, so next month-I've decided I'm going to take the plunge and go to a local uke jam that a local music store hosts. But my questions are:
1) What to expect, especially since I find myself more reserved in a group of people I'm unfamiliar with.
2) Are there requirements to purchase sheet music or songbooks?
I think these are all the the questions I have, but if I think of more, I'll update the post as needed.
Thanks!
Regards,
Rosendust

RafterGirl
09-26-2018, 04:30 PM
I participate in three monthly jams. Two of them have leaders that post the monthly theme & song sheets online. These two groups have 40-60 participants & have a teaching aspect to them. The third group is smaller, 10-15 people. More of a song circle with each person leading a song. You either bring song sheets to share or do a song from the Daily Ukulele songbook. Both groups are very welcoming to newcomers.

If you can find out more about the structure of the jam, it may help you know what to expect & be more comfortable. I will say that finding groups to play with has helped my playing skills advance, helped my confidence, helped me connect with a larger ukulele family, and been immensely enjoyable.

ampeep
09-26-2018, 04:59 PM
There's a wide range of jams; at one end is sheet music or tablets & the other end is no written music, where you follow along. The ones with no music are usually more advanced players that pick up songs quickly.

Since the one you're considering is at a music store, I think it is likely have some written music.

kohanmike
09-26-2018, 08:01 PM
I participate in three monthly jams. Two of them have leaders that post the monthly theme & song sheets online. These two groups have 40-60 participants & have a teaching aspect to them. The third group is smaller, 10-15 people. More of a song circle with each person leading a song. You either bring song sheets to share or do a song from the Daily Ukulele songbook. Both groups are very welcoming to newcomers. If you can find out more about the structure of the jam, it may help you know what to expect & be more comfortable. I will say that finding groups to play with has helped my playing skills advance, helped my confidence, helped me connect with a larger ukulele family, and been immensely enjoyable.

I have a very similar experience. Just a few months ago I found out about an acoustic only jam group that meets at a park Sundays from 12 noon to 2 PM. The head guy posts a PDF song book online with about 120 songs, he also brings printed copies, and participants also bring sheets of other songs to pass out. There are about 8-12 players, mostly guitar, I joined to give me more opportunity to play uke since I play bass uke with my regular group twice a week.

Since guitar players tend to favor E key songs, it forced me to get comfortable with the E chord on my uke. They also have mandolin, slide guitar and harmonica players (which I also do once in awhile). They're extremely open to new people, very welcoming no matter at what level you play.

Rosendust, I suggest you don't be reserved at all and come in as if you've been part of it for a long time.

8 tenor cutaway ukes, 5 acoustic bass ukes, 9 solid body bass ukes, 7 mini electric bass guitars

• Donate to The Ukulele Kids Club, they provide ukuleles to children's hospital music therapy programs. www.theukc.org
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Martinlover
09-27-2018, 12:47 AM
I have tried several groups, some of which meet monthly and others weekly. Two are sponsored by local libraries so there is no charge to attend but one charges for making copies. Another group has a dedicated leader who opens up his case for donations at the end of the jam to cover copies, website upkeep, his time, and the rent of the community center. All are very welcoming and it’s easy to find yourself smiling and laughing no matter what level you are. And you maybe singing before you know it even if you never did that before. Hope you have fun.

Jerryc41
09-27-2018, 01:59 AM
It all depends on the leader, but I think you can expect a great time. From my experience, you will be with a group of friendly people, most of whom already know each other, but thast's okay. The leader will have music, probably in booklet form, and he and the group will suggest what to play. With any luck, you'll wonder how the time has flown by so fast.

Let us know how this turns out

Jerryc41
09-27-2018, 02:01 AM
I have tried several groups, some of which meet monthly and others weekly. Two are sponsored by local libraries so there is no charge to attend but one charges for making copies. Another group has a dedicated leader who opens up his case for donations at the end of the jam to cover copies, website upkeep, his time, and the rent of the community center. All are very welcoming and it’s easy to find yourself smiling and laughing no matter what level you are. And you maybe singing before you know it even if you never did that before. Hope you have fun.

As I was reading this, it sounded very familiar. Then I saw who was writing. :D

By the way, the library no longer charges us for copies.

kypfer
09-27-2018, 12:04 PM
As another who can find himself "more reserved in a group of people I'm unfamiliar with" I'd be inclined to turn up prepared just to sit in for a while and see how things are done. Take an instrument with you, but be prepared to leave it in it's case, for a while at least, until you feel more comfortable in your new surroundings ;)

Good luck :music:

PlastikUke
09-28-2018, 02:35 AM
How a jam is organized, what level the other players are at, whether there's a songbook, etc. probably varies from group to group. So maybe call the music store and ask for more information? (In our small local group the only requirement for new participants is basically "bring your ukulele". Nobody cares if can't play that well yet and people end up sharing song sheets anyway.)

As for being reserved around unfamiliar people: Me too. But I've found that ukulele groups are a setting in which I actually find it easier to get to know people and be a little more open than in most other situations.

Rllink
09-28-2018, 03:06 AM
As for being reserved around unfamiliar people: Me too. But I've found that ukulele groups are a setting in which I actually find it easier to get to know people and be a little more open than in most other situations.One of the reasons that I took up the ukulele was to be more outgoing and less reserved. It has done that. I don't think that ukulele and reserved go together. You need to pick one, and I suggest the ukulele.