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saltytri
10-04-2018, 06:52 AM
This new tenor updates the classic Hawaiian look with some more current features:

18" scale tuned to Bb using TI basses and Savarez trebles
Torrefied Sitka spruce top
Macassar ebony top bindings
Side sound port
Radiused ebony fretboard
EVO gold frets
K&K Aloha Twin pickup


https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1913/43271659450_bb4bff66c4_c.jpg

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1920/31211571158_0ac1aab1e9_c.jpg

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1959/43271657450_6f8c430e8a_c.jpg

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1935/31211565678_9a7aa90ca0_c.jpg

DownUpDave
10-04-2018, 07:19 AM
Wow, drop dead gorgeous David. How do you like the sound of torrified tops. Are you able to tell a difference, even if it is just "Hey that sounds real good".

Another winner, well done

kerneltime
10-04-2018, 07:36 AM
Awesome!! I need to start planning my next ;-)

stevejfc
10-04-2018, 09:28 AM
That is just stunning! Congrats David and the lucky new owner.

Osprey
10-04-2018, 11:23 AM
Beautiful! That’s a great looking ukulele. I love the details you selected.

saltytri
10-04-2018, 12:02 PM
Thanks, Dave! (and you other gents!)

As always, we're out on a limb when we try to make a qualitative judgment about the effect of changing one of the many variables. But, of course, we do it all the time. ;) So here goes.

I've built several instruments with torrefied Sitka spruce. It's my impression that they have very good tone, certainly as good as or better than standard Sitka. They seem to have that right out of the gate. I don't know of any objective evidence to support this and as the estimable Dana Bourgeois observes, it still matters what you do with it:

https://bourgeoisguitars.net/aged-tone-guitar-series/

Assuming that the builder has a successful process for individually voicing each top and doesn't just slap on a .080" Sitka top and the same bracing every time, most or all of the instruments from a builder tend to have similar tone. Nothing about torrefied Sitka rather than other carefully selected Sitka will make a dramatic difference. The difference between a pretty good instrument and a really good instrument might be something like doing five things better by two percent each. Builders who want to make the best instruments they can make are always on the hunt for those small percentages and this could very well be one of them.

SA Condor
10-04-2018, 12:03 PM
That’s a stunner for sure! Nice work.

saltytri
10-04-2018, 12:13 PM
That’s a stunner for sure! Nice work.

Thank you, Condor. In addition to whatever tonal advantages that torrefied wood might have, it has a rich, mellow color that just looks right with koa and some other woods.

mountain goat
10-04-2018, 12:29 PM
Amazing work, David.
I'm reminded also of the words of another esteemed gentleman by the name of Cliff Edwards.
"My Old Girl's My New Girl Now". :)

Spicysteve
10-04-2018, 01:27 PM
Gorgeous David!!! Love the color of the spruce, reminds me of the color of cedar. The binding and rosette are perfectly done, both make a statement but aren’t over the top. Just love the overall look.:drool:

saltytri
10-04-2018, 01:43 PM
Amazing work, David.
I'm reminded also of the words of another esteemed gentleman by the name of Cliff Edwards.
"My Old Girl's My New Girl Now". :)

Good one! :D

Ukulele Eddie
10-04-2018, 04:59 PM
Another beauty, David.

I have two torrefied tops (and had another as well), including my Ono Wahoo with torrefied spruce top and figured sapele body which holds its own in pretty much any company. I think that builder new what he was doing. ;-)

Macmuse
10-04-2018, 05:56 PM
I thought Id finally gotten over wanting another of yours and you go and post this one. ;-)

And radiused fretboards now... so jealous. I still love the side sound port on mine and play it more than any of the other ukes Ive kept around.

Another really gorgeous one there David.

kohanmike
10-04-2018, 06:22 PM
Beautiful. I'm alway curious when someone posts these kind of ukes, they don't list the price, does it run about $2500? I try to always give the price of the ukes I post.

8 tenor cutaway ukes, 5 acoustic bass ukes, 9 solid body bass ukes, 7 mini electric bass guitars

• Donate to The Ukulele Kids Club, they provide ukuleles to children's hospital music therapy programs. www.theukc.org
• Member The CC Strummers www.youtube.com/user/CCStrummers/videos

Macmuse
10-04-2018, 06:33 PM
Beautiful. I'm alway curious when someone posts these kind of ukes, they don't list the price, does it run about $2500? I try to always give the price of the ukes I post.


David lists his prices on his website http://onoukes.com/ and based on what he says this one includes one can work out approximately how much. Can’t speak to any upcharge for any of the wood or gold frets, etc., but the rest puts it under or around the $2k range for the options listed.

Oops, didn’t take the finish into account (I was adding up one for myself and don’t do glossy ;-)... so yes, probably around $2500.

mds725
10-04-2018, 07:38 PM
David, that's a fantastic looking ukulele! Of course, it's still no match for an uke that has a back and sides made of Padauk, but it's pretty close (I also had a builder that knew what he was doing). :)

saltytri
10-05-2018, 05:54 AM
David, that's a fantastic looking ukulele! Of course, it's still no match for an uke that has a back and sides made of Padauk, but it's pretty close (I also had a builder that knew what he was doing). :)

Ha! The lesson there is that padauk is a very good choice for back and sides. Now, about those pores.... :biglaugh:

Photodan
10-05-2018, 11:52 AM
Beautiful!

Kenn2018
10-05-2018, 08:03 PM
I've built several instruments with torrefied Sitka spruce. It's my impression that they have very good tone, certainly as good as or better than standard Sitka. They seem to have that right out of the gate. I don't know of any objective evidence to support this and as the estimable Dana Bourgeois observes, it still matters what you do with it:

https://bourgeoisguitars.net/aged-tone-guitar-series/

Assuming that the builder has a successful process for individually voicing each top and doesn't just slap on a .080" Sitka top and the same bracing every time, most or all of the instruments from a builder tend to have similar tone. Nothing about torrefied Sitka rather than other carefully selected Sitka will make a dramatic difference. The difference between a pretty good instrument and a really good instrument might be something like doing five things better by two percent each. Builders who want to make the best instruments they can make are always on the hunt for those small percentages and this could very well be one of them.[/QUOTE]

That is a gorgeous instrument Dave. I always have a soft spot for koa. And thank you for including the link about the torrefied Sitka spruce. It was very interesting reading. Did you have to experiment a lot to get the perfect finish as well?

I always wondered about the claims about older instruments. Do you think frequent playing also contributes to the more refined & mature sound?

saltytri
10-06-2018, 09:28 AM
Kenn, this is an interesting question! Some people do think that the vibrations that result from playing have that effect. It's a commonly held belief that aging without unusual exposure to vibration changes wood in a way that promotes improved tone. As usual, there is a shortage of objective data. There is a theory in the guitar world that exposing an instrument to externally generated vibration is a shortcut to beneficial aging. There is a commercially available device to do this but I don't remember the name. If you really want to cause a riot in the violin world, bring up the subject of blind testing of million+ dollar vintage violins against high-end contemporary violins. The people who own Strads, Amatis and Guarneris don't like this sort of thing very much. My not-very-important opinion is that we should worry less about other people's theories and just find instruments that please us! :)

I was also interested in the observation of Bourgeois about finishing. The mention of CA is intriguing, particularly because one opinion that gets heard from time to time is that anything that penetrates the top changes the way the wood does its job of vibrating like wood vibrates. I can certainly buy that this is so but it could very well be that it isn't a bad thing. What matters tonally is what the tone turns out to be when the instrument is finished. And whether or not an application of CA actually penetrates rather than just thinly coating the surface probably depends upon the type of CA and how it is applied.

If he was talking about adhesion to torrefied spruce, I haven't seen any reason to be concerned. Same for application regime and final appearance.

Kenn2018
10-06-2018, 11:06 AM
Dave, I have seen that device you mentioned to simulate playing by vibrating the bridge of the guitar, if I remember it correctly.

I've read that playing an instrument improves the sound so often it seems to have passed into accepted wisdom. Unfortunately, it would be extremely difficult to test it.

Thanks for the detailed reply.