PDA

View Full Version : Scoop vs. Cutaway



Martinlover
10-20-2018, 05:57 PM
I like a cutaway for the obvious—playing up the neck and ease of barring at the upper frets. But what is the point of the scoop? I like the look of the scoop but as one who’s never really tried a ukulele with a scoop—does the scoop function the same as a cutaway? Or is it’s purpose different?

hollisdwyer
10-20-2018, 06:04 PM
Interesting question. I’d be interested in seeing the answers.

Kenn2018
10-20-2018, 07:28 PM
My understanding is they both serve the same function: to provide better access to the upper frets. The scoop is supposed to do that while minimizing the loss of internal volume of the body like you get from a cutaway. And of course there are basically two styles of cutaways. Which I can't remember the names of because it's late and I have had a nice Scotch whilst reading the boards.

I know people that play both scoop and cutaway and like both.

kohanmike
10-20-2018, 07:53 PM
All of my tenor ukes are cutaway, mainly because I like the look coming from guitars with cutaway, and of course for better access to the upper frets. I know there's this idea that it cuts back on volume, but I don't find that, all my ukes have very good volume, even when I compare them to non-cutaways. Also, no wear and tear on that part of the bout.

Venetian is the more common rounder style, Florentine comes to a point at the tip.

http://www.kohanmike.com/uploads/Cutaway Venetian uke.jpg
http://www.kohanmike.com/uploads/Cutaway Florentine uke.jpg

8 tenor cutaway ukes, 5 acoustic bass ukes, 10 solid body bass ukes, 7 mini electric bass guitars

• Donate to The Ukulele Kids Club, they provide ukuleles to children's hospital music therapy programs. www.theukc.org
• Member The CC Strummers www.youtube.com/user/CCStrummers/video

ripock
10-20-2018, 08:19 PM
In the past I tried out a scalloped cutaway and I found it didn't offer me as much access as what I finally went with in my custom uke, a florentine cutaway. However those scallops look cool as heck. I will always be torn between the functionality of the regular cutaway and the novel beauty of the scallop

SailingUke
10-21-2018, 05:32 AM
I have one of the original James Hill DaSilva with the the wedge. I don’t play above 12th fret often, but I like the access for strumming.

70sSanO
10-21-2018, 08:07 AM
I have both. The cutaway allows me to barre an "A" shape at the 13th fret. The scalloped at the 11th fret. Barred "C" shape is 14th and 12th respectively. So a cutaway give a bit more room. However, I play above the 12th and have not had an occasion to play a fully barred chord up there. I can play any of the instrumentals I know with a non-scalloped/cutaway. Although it is easier with more room.

I don't think there is any discernible tone differences between the two features.

John

Rllink
10-21-2018, 08:27 AM
I would like to see someone, not a big star, just a regular person, playing way up the neck that far. I'm sure that there are tons of videos, but I haven't found one. For myself, I can never visualize myself playing way up there.

Martinlover
10-21-2018, 10:54 AM
Thanks for all the replies. I discovered the cut away when I bought a used Pono tenor. I am practicing pieces that go up the neck and find the cutaway to be very handy.

70sSanO
10-21-2018, 03:46 PM
I would like to see someone, not a big star, just a regular person, playing way up the neck that far. I'm sure that there are tons of videos, but I haven't found one. For myself, I can never visualize myself playing way up there.

I disagree if someone is playing fingerstyle instrumentals. If you play a ukulele to accompiany singing, the I have to agree that it would be rare.

John

Rllink
10-21-2018, 04:04 PM
I disagree if someone is playing fingerstyle instrumentals. If you play a ukulele to accompiany singing, the I have to agree that it would be rare.

John

What are you disagreeing or agreeing to? That I can or can't visualize myself playing that far up the neck, or that I can't find a video? :)

Croaky Keith
10-21-2018, 10:15 PM
I like the cutaway - I can move my whole hand up the fret board.

I think with a scallop I'd have to stretch my fingers a bit - so I just stick to using a standard double bout, when not using a cutaway.

70sSanO
10-22-2018, 11:09 AM
What are you disagreeing or agreeing to? That I can or can't visualize myself playing that far up the neck, or that I can't find a video? :)

I disagree that you can't find amateur instrumentals on youtube that are played with notes above the 12th, I've stolen ideas from them over the years. But I agree that for a vocalist it is hard to visualize playing chords up there... I can't visualize singing to chords played up there.

John

spookelele
10-23-2018, 09:52 AM
I'm amateur, and I play above the 12. The scale on the uke is pretty short because it's only 4 strings, so fairly often I go above 12th. Also.... Sometimes you have to start above the open chords if you want to start or include the root of a chord. In the end though... There's all that fretboard. Just because you can choose not to use the whole thing, doesn't mean you can't or shouldn't.


https://youtu.be/WjlxHgS8HEg

Jerryc41
10-23-2018, 10:13 AM
I like a cutaway for the obvious—playing up the neck and ease of barring at the upper frets. But what is the point of the scoop? I like the look of the scoop but as one who’s never really tried a ukulele with a scoop—does the scoop function the same as a cutaway? Or is it’s purpose different?

What you have to do is buy a couple of scalloped ukes and see how they compare to your cutaways. :D

Rllink
10-23-2018, 11:02 AM
I'm amateur, and I play above the 12. The scale on the uke is pretty short because it's only 4 strings, so fairly often I go above 12th. Also.... Sometimes you have to start above the open chords if you want to start or include the root of a chord. In the end though... There's all that fretboard. Just because you can choose not to use the whole thing, doesn't mean you can't or shouldn't.


https://youtu.be/WjlxHgS8HEgNow I have seen someone play way up there and it was very nice. Well done.

Dansimpson
10-23-2018, 11:55 AM
There's all that fretboard. Just because you can choose not to use the whole thing, doesn't mean you can't or shouldn't.

Being a much simpler soul and easily pleased, I'm very much a "just because you got all that fretboard it doesnt mean it has to be used" person, LOL

spookelele
10-23-2018, 02:53 PM
Being a much simpler soul and easily pleased, I'm very much a "just because you got all that fretboard it doesnt mean it has to be used" person, LOL

Fair enough. Like I said, you don't have to. But.. it can add variety/texture/color/whatever you want to call it, which is also nice.

valde002
10-29-2018, 05:07 AM
I like this thread because I am thinking about a cutaway. I wonder if a scoop is enough to form pillar/fret chords. I like being able to play up at the neck.

I also notice that the Kamakas and Kanileas do not commonly have cutaways. I wonder why- demand? Kanilea does make a scoop, but I want to be sure I like it first. Kala has a special edition series with scoops, may try that out. Anyone know of good quality brands that make cutaways?

Patrick Madsen
10-29-2018, 08:16 AM
For me the scoop put the wrist/ forearm in an awkward position while a cut away allows for the wrist and forearm to relax in a normal position while playing up there.

valde002
10-29-2018, 09:27 AM
For me the scoop put the wrist/ forearm in an awkward position while a cut away allows for the wrist and forearm to relax in a normal position while playing up there.

Great point! I wonder if the fingers would get cramped as well, trying to all each up in there.

is there a difference in the way one holds the uke, or with the weight of the body?

Martinlover
10-29-2018, 09:36 AM
I like this thread because I am thinking about a cutaway. I wonder if a scoop is enough to form pillar/fret chords. I like being able to play up at the neck.

I also notice that the Kamakas and Kanileas do not commonly have cutaways. I wonder why- demand? Kanilea does make a scoop, but I want to be sure I like it first. Kala has a special edition series with scoops, may try that out. Anyone know of good quality brands that make cutaways?

Kala, Pono, Ko’olau and other custom shops offer the cutaway. I find it very helpful as my hands are medium-small sized and my fingers are slim. So the cutaway helps to get those barre chords. I am almost thinking of making it a prerequisite to any new ukulele acquisitions. But that may not stick if there’s a great deal on a used ukulele.

Patrick Madsen
10-29-2018, 10:36 AM
I cradle it with the heel of the left hand to help with the stretch to upper frets past the body

seesar
10-29-2018, 11:08 AM
I like a cutaway for the obvious—playing up the neck and ease of barring at the upper frets. But what is the point of the scoop? I like the look of the scoop but as one who’s never really tried a ukulele with a scoop—does the scoop function the same as a cutaway? Or is it’s purpose different?

I believe the purpose of the scoop has to do with keeping the fingers of the right hand from contacting the upper bout. I think I heard James Hill discuss this once, saying that having space there suited his right hand technique.

Check out this video to see James' right hand technique and how the scoop helps him:


https://youtu.be/nlfrHelmX34

Jim Yates
10-29-2018, 11:28 AM
I have yet to see a uke with a scoop, but the scoop does not have the same function as a cutaway. The scoop does not allow you to play any further up the neck, in fact some frets are removed for the scoop. The purpose of the scoop is to allow playing clawhammer style over the end of the fingerboard without getting hung up on frets, thus it's often called "the frailing scoop" These are common on banjos and the tail of a mandolin is often scooped as well. Dulcimer builders/players call these scoops "strum hollows".

70sSanO
10-29-2018, 02:22 PM
Unless I'm mistaken, this is what I thought a scoop was...

https://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=84754&d=1446069196

John

Jerryc41
10-30-2018, 02:22 AM
Unless I'm mistaken, this is what I thought a scoop was...

https://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=84754&d=1446069196

John

That's what I thought, too. That must be considerably more difficult to make than a cutout.

On the other hand, "scoop" make me think of ice cream, and I think we're all out. : (

113134

Jim Yates
11-04-2018, 03:21 PM
That is a very different scoop than I was thinking of. It seems the term "scoop" is used to refer to more than one thing. I wish I were able to post photos directly. It seems that scoops on dulcimers, banjos, guitars and mandolins have a different meaning than on ukuleles.

Martinlover
11-04-2018, 04:05 PM
Unless I'm mistaken, this is what I thought a scoop was...

https://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=84754&d=1446069196

John

Yes, this is the scoop I was thinking of when I posted the question.

Jerryc41
11-05-2018, 11:52 PM
Kala, Pono, Ko’olau and other custom shops offer the cutaway.

And don't forget BugsGear, like the blue one Carmen has. Hard to beat for the price. : )

https://www.amazon.com/BugsGear-Ukulele-BK-Kissed-Adventure/dp/B00OKXDUZU

Martinlover
03-01-2019, 05:54 PM
Happened to see this video that explains the Kanile’a scoop at 1:40.


https://youtu.be/GAtUMiNP7-Y

Kenn2018
03-02-2019, 09:04 AM
Happened to see this video that explains the Kanile’a scoop at 1:40.


https://youtu.be/GAtUMiNP7-Y

Thanks for posting this. I had read that some makers use the scoop because they believe it doesn't affect the sound as much as a cutaway. Glad to hear it confirmed.