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Orton Pearson
11-01-2018, 01:34 AM
What do you do when one string breaks or is damaged? Do you replace just that one string or do you replace all four such that they will all be equally 'played in'?

Down Up Dick
11-01-2018, 03:14 AM
I think it depends on how old the string set is and how the string broke.

One of my banjolele’s strings broke at the tailpiece, so I put it back on and tightened it back up, and it broke again. Then, since the strings were old, I changed them all.

I don’t like to change strings, so put it off as long as possible. :old:

Swamp Yankee
11-01-2018, 03:15 AM
... when a string breaks on a uke, just buy another uke.

Croaky Keith
11-01-2018, 03:16 AM
Just replace the one that broke. :)

Swamp Yankee
11-01-2018, 03:18 AM
I think it depends on how old the string set is and how the string broke.

One of my banjolele’s strings broke at the tailpiece, so I put it back on and tightened it back up, and it broke again. Then, since the strings were old, I changed them all.

I don’t like to change strings, so put it off as long as possible. :old:

you might check for burrs or sharp edges on your tailpiece. A bit of sanding with a tightly rolled up tube of 800 grit wet/dry sandpaper will take care of most.

UkerDanno
11-01-2018, 03:29 AM
Replace the whole set, it's like $5-$10...then you have all new, matched strings.

strumsilly
11-01-2018, 03:34 AM
replace them all, you'll be surprised how much better the uke sounds with fresh strings

Rllink
11-01-2018, 03:40 AM
Replace the whole set, it's like $5-$10...then you have all new, matched strings.

I'm in agreement, although in five years of playing my ukulele every day I've never broken a string, so I can't speak from experience. But if I did I would change out the whole set. What do you do with the other three strings if you don't? I can guarantee you that if I took one string out of a set, I wouldn't be able to find the other three a week later. But if they are new strings and you break one, I guess that would be a different story. Why am I even answering this question? I've never broken a string to replace it and this is the first time I've ever thought about what I would do if I did. What do I know? Don't listen to me?:)

Down Up Dick
11-01-2018, 04:23 AM
you might check for burrs or sharp edges on your tailpiece. A bit of sanding with a tightly rolled up tube of 800 grit wet/dry sandpaper will take care of most.

Nah, the strings were really old. It was the tight first string that popped. I don’t play this banjolele very much any more. It was the the first “banjo type instrument” that I bought. Mostly it just sits around to look at.

We ol’ guys tend ta git sentimental as the years pass. :old:

frianm
11-01-2018, 05:29 AM
I replace them all and sometimes go to a different manufacturer. However I am sort of stuck now on Living Waters or Worth browns.

Bill Sheehan
11-01-2018, 11:00 AM
... when a string breaks on a uke, just buy another uke.

Hahahahahahaha !! Love it !! :)

jimavery
11-01-2018, 11:35 AM
I think I've only ever broken one string in six or so years of playing, and that was when I tried a new (to me) brand and tuned them up to BbEbGC (three semitones higher than what the strings were probably designed for). I can't be doing with wimpy strings so I replaced them all.

Ukecaster
11-01-2018, 11:44 AM
If it's a soprano or concert with nice strings, and the A string (as usual), I just unroll a bit of 30lb. Seaguar Blue and string it up, works and sounds great. Handy stuff to have around. If the strings are old or I didn't like em anyway, all new ones go on.

113164

SailingUke
11-01-2018, 07:08 PM
I have rarely broken a string, but I have had a few shred. Normally when this happens I replace the set. On a new set (1 month) or less I replace the damaged or broken string. I tend to change strings about every six months so I don’t have old strings.

bratsche
11-02-2018, 09:12 AM
I've yet to break one, but it would depend on if I were or were not recently thinking about replacing them all. If I weren't, then I'd just replace the broken one. That's what I do on my viola, where they tend to wear out (frayed or unwound windings) rather than actually snapping in two. But I don't use "string sets" on anything other than my mandolin family instruments (which are a type I've never seen break, even after years on an instrument). On ukes and violin family instruments, I use mixes of different strings.

bratsche