PDA

View Full Version : Low G goes sharp up the fretboard



robinboyd
11-29-2018, 04:41 PM
Hi guys. I think I already know the answer to my question, but I wouldn't mind sharing my ideas with you.

I currently have 2 ukes strung with a low G, and I tend to only use one of them to strum with. Anyway, I just noticed that that particular uke goes very sharp on the G string when I play up the fretboard. I've currently got it strung with an unwound fluorocarbon low G and I was wondering if I'm likely to be able to fix the problem by switching it out with a wound string. I've previously strung that uke with a couple of different wound strings, as well as an Aquila Red and I didn't notice any problems, but like I said, I rarely play that uke up the fretboard, so that doesn't necessarily mean there weren't any problems.

What do you guys think?

anthonyg
11-29-2018, 10:10 PM
A wound low G string would definitely improve things compared to an unwound low G string.
That's the whole point of wound strings. Poor intonation is the price you pay for insisting on using an unwound string.

Having said that. I would want to measure the instrument first to see just how well it was built/setup before I would claim that a wound string would make the intonation perfect.

robinboyd
11-29-2018, 10:16 PM
A wound low G string would definitely improve things compared to an unwound low G string.
That's the whole point of wound strings. Poor intonation is the price you pay for insisting on using an unwound string.

Having said that. I would want to measure the instrument first to see just how well it was built/setup before I would claim that a wound string would make the intonation perfect.

I wouldn't hope to get it perfect. The other strings aren't perfect either. As long as it's in the same ballpark as the other strings, it should be okay.

Strumdaddy
11-30-2018, 12:54 AM
It's the thickness of the unwound G that makes it prone to going sharp. That's why guitars are usually set up with a saddle that slopes to give the fatter strings more length. If you are keen on an unwound G you could investigate a compensated saddle that gives that string more length. Or a wound string would probably do the trick because it is thinner.
If it were me I would try to solve it because bar chords up the neck with a sharp low G string would bother me.

anthonyg
11-30-2018, 01:12 AM
I don't want to be a jerk however its the stiffness of the string that's the issue and not the thickness per se.

Now of course if your comparing strings made of the same material then the thicker string will be the stiffer string however since we aren't always comparing strings made of the same material then you have to be careful assuming that its about thickness.

Wound strings are more flexible even when they may be quite thick because its the core stiffness that matters with wound strings.

MikeHollandGuitar
11-30-2018, 02:40 AM
It could well be just a faulty or old string. I have had this issue a few times on classical guitars and once on a Ukulele. I would just change the string first before doing anything else.
Mike

robinboyd
11-30-2018, 09:51 AM
I've got a spare Fremont Soloist I can send you Robin, just drop me a PM and I'll stick it in the mail:D

Thanks Campbell, but I also have a spare Fremont Soloist. I was just wondering if I should try putting it on.