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ChuckBarnett
12-03-2018, 07:03 AM
My LMI plan calls for a bridge that has holes drilled into the back end and slots that guide strings to the saddle. There is a classical style shown as well. I had thought to do a pin bridge but then realized that the sound hole is too small for that (tho I see them on pictures of ukes???)

I stumbled across a thread that describes problems with the slot style where strings wear through the wood??

I was all set to do that but now am asking for advice (once again...)

I wonder if I'll ever get this thing done.

cathouse willy
12-03-2018, 07:38 AM
I think this is what you're looking for.. The edges of the tie block have bone strips to keep the strings from biting the wood.

https://i.postimg.cc/QMFL7LMw/maxresdefault.jpg (https://postimg.cc/4KRFCSVQ)

ChuckBarnett
12-03-2018, 07:59 AM
That looks great, Cathouse. Is that is a 6-string classical guitar? I wonder about doing that on a tenor uke -those classical bridges are wider than I would like. Do they need to be that wide or is it just convention?

ChuckBarnett
12-03-2018, 08:05 AM
Here is another style bridge (Jay Lichty) that actually is pretty attractive. How do you restring? There must be a ball or knot or something on the bottom end. Perhaps you push a new string thru from the top and tie something on or tie a knot?

113906

cathouse willy
12-03-2018, 08:45 AM
That looks great, Cathouse. Is that is a 6-string classical guitar? I wonder about doing that on a tenor uke -those classical bridges are wider than I would like. Do they need to be that wide or is it just convention?

Chuck that's a picture from the web that I referred to for how to ideas when I built the bridge for my baritone uke.I followed the plan I got from Georgia Luthier and It turned out well for a first attempt.

BlackBearUkes
12-03-2018, 09:34 AM
Do yourself a favor and do a string through style bridge, its the least problematic down the road.

saltytri
12-03-2018, 09:54 AM
What Duane said. These are neat and clean, easily strung, easily made, and you know that it will never come off. Also, there is a school of thought that the direct attachment of the strings to the bridge plate contributes to good tone. No flames, please! :)


https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1829/29586509998_99523ee064_z.jpg



Here's how you do it, from the fabulous Beau Hannam:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ee2JDXnHZY

DPO
12-03-2018, 10:50 AM
Here is another style bridge (Jay Lichty) that actually is pretty attractive. How do you restring? There must be a ball or knot or something on the bottom end. Perhaps you push a new string thru from the top and tie something on or tie a knot?

113906

As others have said string through the bridge is as simple as it gets. Tie a glass bead on the end and bingo.

ChuckBarnett
12-03-2018, 11:27 AM
Okay, I am convinced that is what I want to do. Don't have a plan for one of those. Do I simply work with the dimensions from my LMI plan for the string-in-slot bridge? What about hole sizes and angles? I was gearing up for a 7 degree back tilt on the saddle. Does this change that? --Phew! I can sure wear a thing out!!

saltytri
12-03-2018, 11:34 AM
My tenor bridges are about 3.625" long, .8" wide. Holes are drilled with a #60 (1mm) bit. It's fine to tilt the saddle but that might be more complication than you need, especially for a first build.

ChuckBarnett
12-03-2018, 01:17 PM
David, thank you. I see that your saddle slots are open-ended. As I understand it that may create problems if one wanted to install an under saddle pickup. Being new at this, I don't know how that might work.

Thank you for taking the time! :-)

saltytri
12-03-2018, 01:31 PM
Not as far as I know. I've installed that type of p/u on my instruments and they worked fine. It's true that pocket slots are in vogue, though.

sequoia
12-03-2018, 04:01 PM
Below is a bridge that SMD offers which I think is attractive. I've bought them and they look and work well. $20 bucks. You do have to drill the holes. Easy alternative to making your own bridges if you just plan on doing a few ukes. (yeah right)

113924

Kekani
12-03-2018, 06:43 PM
If you’re doing a string through bridge, be sure you have an adequate bridge patch. Nice thing is the extreme break angles you can implement if you wanted. I moved from string through to a “standard” tie bridge because I saw some of my instruments make it to stages; I’ve been on stage when strings break, and unless you’re BB King, it can be an issue.

https://youtu.be/MXwBsxTBxGM
And Dave has a good point about the Turner Tilt-back saddle - you need to be aware of where your actual contact point on top of the saddle is specifically in relation to your scale length. The higher the action, the greater the compensation (and vice versa), but that in and of itself is an advantage.

saltytri
12-03-2018, 07:33 PM
GREAT vid, Aaron! I'm going to start singing the blues whenever I change strings.

Good point about the bridge plate. Mine are carbon fiber so there's not much to worry about. As far as I know, a wood plate is fine if beads are used properly, with the knot tied so that the bead can slide along the string as opposed to tying the bead into the knot. The knot should pull the bead against the plate to maximize contact area.

ChuckBarnett
12-05-2018, 07:38 AM
So, I thought I had a 1/8 in by 1/8 inch shank spiral downcut router bit. Turns out it's an engraving bit which means it doesn't go very deep. I would like to find something that's a good 3/8 inch cutting depth. Using it on my Dremel with a
plunge base that I just bought for that purpose. Any ideas?

ChuckBarnett
12-05-2018, 08:12 AM
Thank you for the quick reply! I do have a Bosch Colt but the plunge base was two or three times more than a plunge base for the Dremel.

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
12-05-2018, 08:43 AM
That pic of the Pernambuco uke isn't mine- thats David Ingalls.

I also do string through bridges (with a .018" carbon fiber bridge plate and 'gem stone' permanent buttons thingys, [instead of beads]- see video below). Eric devine uses an ebony bridge plate- either work. Also, if you retro fit a piece of ebony or rosewood onto the inside of an already built instrument (i did it yesterday for a guitar repair)



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ws-tPIjpDOo&t=9s

and


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GTm4z8SXOjs&t=10s

cathouse willy
12-05-2018, 10:51 AM
Chuck, Lee Valley tools have a 1/8 in dremel bit. Search their site for
product number 86j04.06. I tried to add a direct link but the forum software says its spam.???????

ChuckBarnett
12-05-2018, 11:46 AM
Thank you, Beau. I have no plan for this kind of bridge but it lloks like you shoot for about a 45 degree angle up to the saddle. basically on the uke you were stringing up, the holes are about 1/2 way between the back edge of the bridge and the saddle. Is there any advantagle/disadvantage to that angle and placement? and do you drill the holes straight down from the top? Perhaps you pre-drill the bridge?

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
12-05-2018, 12:06 PM
My bridges are 4" x 3/4", and about 1/4" (6mm-7mm) thick. (Either African blackwood or ebony)

Saddle slot is 1/8" wide x 5mm deep and tilted back about 6-7 degrees.

The front edge of the saddle slot is about 5mm back from the front edge of the bridge.

String holes are about halfway between back edge of saddle slot and back of bridge.

String holes are drilled straight down, but not all the way through- (this stops glue coming up the holes when you glue the bridge on.) I counter sink the holes and dremel string ramps too (see attached video)

Welcome to the brain of an Aussie living in Merica- i use inches and mm on the same job!!!


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=buKpizAhY-E&t=5s

ChuckBarnett
12-06-2018, 05:08 AM
Welcome to the brain of an Aussie living in Merica- i use inches and mm on the same job!


😉😉


I am finding myself getting used to the meaning of numbers metric and better able to think in those terms. I still "translate" through imperial though. It isn't like I think in metric terms!

tonyturley
12-06-2018, 07:44 AM
Any tips on safely cutting an accurate closed-end, tilted saddle slot? Bridges are small and hard to hold, and I'd rather not stick my finger into a spinning router bit - again.

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
12-06-2018, 08:14 AM
THis jig idea i stole from the might Aaron Oya !

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fi1UbKvzZzQ&t=19s

ChuckBarnett
12-06-2018, 08:20 AM
I am going to build the jig that Kekani demoed in a video in this thread. I like the idea. :-)

ChuckBarnett
12-06-2018, 11:38 AM
Here is a shot of the LMI plan for a bridge. Note the reference to compensation. I see bridges set at a slight angle and wonder if that is what they drawer intended to communicate -that you drop the low end back (if using the low string verseus high tuned) a hair less than 1/16". Or are you dropping the whole saddle back that amount? Not trying to be perfect here; just want to undearstand and learn.

Gratefully,

strumsilly
12-06-2018, 12:38 PM
I've been through a lot of ukes. I'd rate bridges:
1. string through
2. traditional tie on.
3. pin [but they do look good]
4. slot, which can by necessity be converted to string through, but the looks deteriorate.

ChuckBarnett
12-06-2018, 12:47 PM
Thank you. Yes, I have decided to do the string-through style. LMI plan does not show that but I'm getting a picture, thanks to this forum. :-)

sequoia
12-06-2018, 02:59 PM
Or are you dropping the whole saddle back that amount? Not trying to be perfect here; just want to undearstand and learn.

Gratefully,

An angled, compensated saddle like that works only if you are stringing up strings for "non reentrant" tuning. A standard set-up for the ukulele is "reentrant"* and a angled saddle will not work. If you string up with a low G (one octave lower than an unwound string thus making the tuning non reentrant), the angled saddle will give you better intonation because it compensate for string diameter. However, the big question is alway by how much and that can get sticky because it depends on the diameter of your strings. It gets complicated but a little research on reentrant vs non reentrant tuning will help. See here:

*https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reentrant_tuning

ChuckBarnett
12-06-2018, 03:52 PM
Excellent! Just what I was looking for.

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
12-07-2018, 04:20 AM
By "angled saddle", it's not angled like a guitar, but backwards (in a straight line towards the butt) to fix slight torquing problems when the top rotates due to string tension.

tonyturley
12-07-2018, 06:21 AM
Thanks for the jig idea, Beau. I'm learning a little bit more every day about this lutherie thing. Not bad for an old fart nearing retirement.

Briangriffinukuleles
12-08-2018, 08:30 PM
Okay, I am convinced that is what I want to do. Don't have a plan for one of those. Do I simply work with the dimensions from my LMI plan for the string-in-slot bridge? What about hole sizes and angles? I was gearing up for a 7 degree back tilt on the saddle. Does this change that? --Phew! I can sure wear a thing out!!
Come on Chuck, you don't need a plan for this, just stretch your strings and figure where to drill the holes. Drill them straight down through the bridge, the soundboard, and the brace underneath. You will never tear your bridge off, a simple knot underneath will suffice, Drill your holes just large enough to pass the strings through, and get that damned thing singing finally. Then bring it up and show me.

ChuckBarnett
12-09-2018, 02:04 AM
😁😁😁

Aye, mate. Soon!

And thanks, again for all the encouragement and wisdom!

ChuckBarnett
12-10-2018, 07:15 AM
Here is a practice bridge with saddle in slot at between 6 and 7 degrees back lean. I can get away with strings 1, 2, and 4 going through holes made by a #60 bit. But the 3rd string required a #57. I suppose strings from different makers vary in gauge, etc. I simply got a set of Aquila new Nylgut strings set up for the 4th string being low rather than high.
I did not drill the holes completely through at this point.

I welcome any tips or suggestions. Thank you, once again!

ChuckBarnett
12-10-2018, 07:24 AM
And here is my practice jig. Not sure if I will need to improve on it, given that it takes me a couple 3 years to make an instrument! :-) :-)

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
12-10-2018, 09:11 AM
String width at bridge should be whatever the FB is at the 12th fret

Its ok if the string holes in the bridge as a bit bigger. EG- i use the same drill bit for all my holes, which is at least as wide as the C string.

sequoia
12-10-2018, 03:30 PM
Nice looking instrument.

ChuckBarnett
12-11-2018, 02:11 AM
Thank you. It's turning out that way. I feel I've stumbled along in the right direction and things have worked out with wood and all.