PDA

View Full Version : When did chunking become chucking?



bonesigh
01-14-2019, 11:05 AM
Pet peeve I guess but I have noticed the term change. Please don’t chuck your ukes. Unless you’re throwing ‘em my way 🤣

Ukecaster
01-14-2019, 11:09 AM
No...when did chucking become chunking? :D. Either way, its a cool technique. I don't do it well, so I'm flunking.

rainbow21
01-14-2019, 11:21 AM
Funky post (thanks to autocorrect)

Swamp Yankee
01-14-2019, 12:22 PM
It's a very similar technique to "clucking" in clawhammer banjo. One fingernail strikes the note on a downstroke and the others (or the palm) mute it immediately thereafter. Done over the 17th fret it makes a distinctive clucking sound. Lots of clawhammer banjos have no frets up there and a scoop carved in the fretboard to make it easier to cluck.
Calling it chucking or chunking is new to me ... I still think of it as clucking.

bonesigh
01-14-2019, 01:03 PM
I kind of like clucking. My chickens to do too, LOL

Hmm...21...I’m not sure what auto was corrected?

Kyle23
01-14-2019, 01:16 PM
I actually use chuck instead of chunk. Chuck sounds like the noise it makes when you "chuck". Chunk always sounded weird to me.

RafterGirl
01-14-2019, 01:47 PM
If you chuck on the up strum, is it up chucking?:rolleyes:

Bill Sheehan
01-14-2019, 02:11 PM
If you chuck on the up strum, is it up chucking?:rolleyes:

Hahahahahahahahaha!!!! Awesome!!!!!!

DPO
01-14-2019, 02:24 PM
If you chuck on the up strum, is it up chucking?:rolleyes:

:smileybounce:

RafterGirl
01-14-2019, 03:13 PM
I can’t take total credit for that one. It’s a running joke at one of my uke groups.

bonesigh
01-14-2019, 05:39 PM
I think it sounds like a chunk like ‘bam!’ Stop that thang! Chuck is someone’s name. I just thought it might be an interesting topic, and it is. Think I’ll go upchuck now then on to feed my Shitzoo dog. Actually spelled Shih Tzu and pronounced nothing like what I said before.

Here’s an interesting take on the word ��
In Australian English the word chuck is often found in phrases where it means ‘to perform’, ‘to do’, or ‘to put on’— as in chuck a wobbly (a variant of the Standard English throw a wobbly). While this use of chuck is not exclusively Australian, there are a number of well-established forms that suggest its resonance in the national idiom. The earliest, dating from the 1940s, is chuck a willy (become angry; have a fit of annoyance or temper). Most other chuck expressions appear much later, from the 1970s on.

chuck a berko: display an outburst of anger, become angry. In Australian English berko means ‘mad, crazy, or angry’, and is an alteration of berserk. ‘Real narkie bastard. Ignore you for months, then chuck a berko over nothin’.’ (R. Sims, The Shadow Maker, 2007) There are a number of variant expressions with a similar meaning, including chuck a wobbly, chuck a willy, and chuck a mickey.

chuck a browneye: make the rude gesture of bending over and exposing one’s buttocks and anus. ‘I haven’t laughed so much since me and Rory gave browneyes to a busload of rubbernecks’. (Tracks, August 1978)

chuck a sickie: take a day’s sick leave from work (with the implication that the person is not really ill). One of the nation’s most familiar workplace idioms. ‘The pressure of letting down a mate is stronger than the lure of ‘chucking a sickie’, an innovative wages deal among New South Wales ferry deckhands has found.‘ (Courier-Mail, September 1999)

chuck a uey: do a U-turn. The shortening uey for ‘U-turn’ in Australian English is usually found in the expression chuck a uey or do a uey. The phrase usually refers to motor vehicles, but can be found in other contexts too: ‘Motorist Priya Wickremasena, 41, saw the 1.5m saltwater croc sitting in the middle of the road. “All of a sudden he chucked a U-ey, and then started chasing me”, he said.’ (Herald Sun, December 2011)

Love to hear more examples of phrases beginning with chuck a … that you may know or use.

Croaky Keith
01-14-2019, 11:15 PM
"Chunk. The sound made when you stop the strings from vibrating immediadely after having been plucked."

I read that somewhere, so 'chunk' it is. :music:

(Chuck means to throw.)

Jarmo_S
01-14-2019, 11:30 PM
Because I'm not english, I mainly base what term I use in that chuck sounds more percussive to me. The way I get the strongest chuck is by not only strumming with index finger down, but all 3 (leaving pinky out perhaps) and way I mute I'm not sure, might be combined with both palm of my hand and also thumb.

Chunk is like a pieace of meat ... soft. So if really chunking it is maybe when I strum up with my index finger and then mute. It sounds a while. Some downwards body tapping can also have that thing of not muting the strings percussively immediately. So that is chunk, in my opinion.

:)

So I kindly disagree with Keith above.

EDW
01-15-2019, 01:55 AM
Lets have a poll to make it all official. I prefer thunking

Jerryc41
01-15-2019, 02:21 AM
Although I'm relatively new to uke, it seems that the terms have been used simultaneously, depending on who is saying the word. I prefer "chunking."

UkerDanno
01-15-2019, 02:50 AM
When did closed become shuttered.

When did helpful hint become hack!

When did song sheet become chart!! I call it music BTW, I'm referring to a sheet with chords and words. It's music to me, it creates music...:shaka:

When did wheels become rims!!!

Language evolves, I guess...:confused:

WestyShane
01-15-2019, 11:24 AM
Chucking a Donut :D

In parts of the US that would be "chucking a Brodie". Brodie being the last name of an old-time daredevil who was the first to jump off of the Brooklyn Bridge (or maybe it was some other high bridge).

In my household, it's "spinning donuts" and "chunking".

WestyShane
01-15-2019, 11:24 AM
When did closed become shuttered.

When did helpful hint become hack!

When did song sheet become chart!! I call it music BTW, I'm referring to a sheet with chords and words. It's music to me, it creates music...:shaka:

When did wheels become rims!!!

Language evolves, I guess...:confused:

What color-way is your uke?

Swamp Yankee
01-15-2019, 11:41 AM
Lets have a poll to make it all official. I prefer thunking

Whod'a thunkit?

Swamp Yankee
01-15-2019, 11:43 AM
If you chuck on the up strum, is it up chucking?:rolleyes:

If you keep getting it wrong, are you blowing chunks?

bonesigh
01-15-2019, 05:28 PM
Keep chucking ‘em at me �� Just a thought...”Blowing Chunks”....new band or song?

Ukecaster
01-15-2019, 05:58 PM
Chucky says....

114814

janeray1940
01-15-2019, 06:15 PM
Or you could just call it "palm muting" and skip the whole debate...

Croaky Keith
01-15-2019, 11:00 PM
.....but some times I use my thumb.... ;)

Swamp Yankee
01-16-2019, 03:58 AM
.....but some times I use my thumb.... ;)

...and then there's the left-handed chord muting ;)

Ukecaster
01-16-2019, 04:10 AM
...and then there's the left-handed chord muting ;)

Is that lucking, or lunking? :D

CeeJay
01-16-2019, 04:46 AM
Or you could just call it "palm muting" and skip the whole debate...

This is what I understand it to be as well.

CeeJay
01-16-2019, 04:46 AM
...and then there's the left-handed chord muting ;)

That's dry strumming.

Braddtastic
01-16-2019, 06:56 AM
I actually use chuck instead of chunk. Chuck sounds like the noise it makes when you "chuck". Chunk always sounded weird to me.

Totally agree. Never understood how or why "chunking" was a thing. To my ears, "chucking" just sounds cooler and a lot closer to the sound of what's actually happening.

bonesigh
01-22-2019, 01:47 PM
Solved Uke minutes #23
https://youtu.be/RrJvuzhMxGs