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Ahnko Honu
05-24-2009, 12:00 PM
Not sure if this should be posted here or in Guitars section. Anyone here familiar with the Mexican Requinto? 6 string and about the size of a baritone 'ukulele but tuned A D G C E A so I would think easier for a person more familiar with a 'ukulele (like myself) than a guitar to pick up than a baritone 'ukulele which would be just the opposite. They seem to be pretty reasonable in price too with solid top Requintos starting at around $130.00. Anyone here own and play a Requinto? How do you like it? Mahalo for your thoughts. :shaka:
http://www.lucidaguitars.com/fileadmin/Lucida/Images_Big/LG-RQ1-Big.jpg

haole
05-24-2009, 01:01 PM
Never heard of it until now, but it's awesome! I wonder if this is what Paul from KoAloha had in mind for a six-string based on a baritone.

I dig the Paracho requintos with the cutaway and built-in electronics. Under $200, too!

Craig
05-24-2009, 01:10 PM
Last year I went through a brief Requinto obsession. I eventually purchased a Guitalele, which is the same thing. It didn't really trip my trigger...but it might trip yours. During my quest, I played a very nice Requinto (1-2k range) that sounded great! But, the tenor ukulele has me by the heart and everything else. I sold the Guitalele within a couple of days of owning it.

Ahnko Honu
05-24-2009, 01:15 PM
Last year I went through a brief Requinto obsession. I eventually purchased a Guitalele, which is the same thing.

Was that the Yamaha Guitalele? Isn't that more a tenor size?

Craig
05-24-2009, 02:55 PM
Was that the Yamaha Guitalele? Isn't that more a tenor size?
It's a bit bigger than a tenor and the body is thicker. Even the other Requintos I played, the bodies were more guitar like, making it less comfortable to hold. I think the Koaloha DVI is Requinto-like.

experimentjon
05-24-2009, 06:19 PM
Hmm, never heard of the Requinto. But I do own a Mele Guitarlele. Its riding in an old Kamaka-style baritone case. I can tell you that it blows away the Yamaha Guitarlele. I have mine tuned to EADGBE, but the strings are a bit pretty loose, and I might be able to crank it up 5 half-steps, but I have never tried it, and know that I'm too cheap and lazy to replace strings.

But my overall assessment of my Mele, which retails for something like 700 is that the guitarlele really is not that good of a compromise between guitar and uke. Granted, I prefer the sound of steel strings over nylon classical strings. But really, after playing a full size guitar, ones that retail for half of what the mele goes for, the Mele just cannot compete. Yes, this is an apples to oranges comparison, but still...the overall instrument just isn't a very enjoyable experience IMO.

The cool part is that you can play it with your right hand pretty much just like a uke, with you regular strum pattern and chunking and everything. And it's a cool way to learn guitar chords if you're making the transition. But really, the sound just doesn't do it for me. I just brought mine out and gave it a few strums, and I'd say the sound isn't as full as a guitar, and not as bright and precise as a uke. Yeah, I can't really describe it, but Ahnko, if you happen to have a good electric bass or a solid-wood Taylor/Martin acoustic cuitar lying around in your closet, I might be willing to trade.

Ahnko Honu
05-24-2009, 06:23 PM
Here's Kanile'a Guitarlele; http://ukulele.pua2.com/details/cool178.html
http://ukulele.pua2.com/photo/uke/cool178_1.jpg

I'm mainly comparing the Requinto as an option to the Baritone which it seems closer to in size. From what I gather the guitalele is closer to the tenor. I wish Yahama sold Guitaleles in the US just so I could try one out locally before I make a commitment.

experimentjon
05-24-2009, 06:36 PM
Here's Kanile'a Guitarlele; http://ukulele.pua2.com/details/cool178.html
http://ukulele.pua2.com/photo/uke/cool178_1.jpg

I'm mainly comparing the Requinto as an option to the Baritone which it seems closer to in size. From what I gather the guitalele is closer to the tenor. I wish Yahama sold Guitaleles in the US just so I could try one out locally before I make a commitment.

Ah, is that why people charge such ridiculous prices for Guitarleles here on the secondary market? I was shocked to see Yamaha Guitarleles, brand new go for $30 USD in Hong Kong. I was in Tom Lee music, which is pretty much a music store for the rich, since they charge MSRP+markup, which is pretty ridiculous, since you can buy two Gibsons at street price for the price of one at MSRP. But that aside, they had one guitarlele and one uke. The uke was a pretty cheap Aria soprano, that they were selling at $50 USD. I was not willing to pay. So I asked them (in fluent Chinese) how much the guitarlele was, totally prepared for sticker-shock. They told me $238. I remember turning to my dad and asking if that was in American dollars or HK dollars. (I was like...how did they know I was American?!) LOL. But it was HK dollars...so divide by the pegged rate of 7.8-ish.

What a deal, eh? And the only thing that stopped me from snapping one up was that I knew we didn't have room in the suitcases thanks to all the other stuff that we were bringing back, and my mother, for whatever reason didn't want me to hand carry it onto the plane. Oh well. I have my mele now. And as noted, the Mele is better than the Yamaha. Is it $670 worth of improvement? Ehrm....not a chance in hell...not even with the dolphin inlay.

Ahnko Honu
05-24-2009, 07:00 PM
There's a Yamaha Guitalele on Oahu Craigslist for $300 right now, ridiculous!

Lori
05-24-2009, 08:02 PM
Check out this thread:
http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/showthread.php?t=10885

There is also the 1/4 guitar, another option. The Strunal company makes several models.
http://www.smallguitars.com/results.php?CategoryID=26

–Lori

Ahnko Honu
05-24-2009, 09:51 PM
Instead of a guitarlele I REALLY like the idea of a real authentic made in old Mexico ethnically correct Requinto. Hawaii and Mexico have very old ties the first Hawaiian cowboys or Paniolo coming from Mexico back in 1832 the Mexican Vaqueros being the best cattlemen in the world. In 1798 British explorer Capt. George Vancouver gifted King Kamehameha I with 5 heads of cattle. The King put a kapu on them no hunting on penalty of death. By the reign of King Kamehameha the III in 1832 the cattle had multiplied into the thousands and were overrunning the land so the King requested from the Mexican Government Vaqueros to help round up these wild cattle. The name Paniolo is a corruption of the word Espaniole or Spanish as the Vaqueros were first identified as. These Vaqueros introduced cattle culture to the native Hawaiians and taught them the skills needed to be A1 cowboys, but they also introduced the guitar to the Hawaiians who quickly adapted their own way of tuning Kiho'alu (slack key), and playing making it their own several years before the arrival of the first ancestor of the 'ukulele from the Azores Islands. I'd like to think a Hawaiian Paniolo was playing a Requinto 160 years ago sort of the big brother to the 'ukulele still to come.

No Requinto fans here?

fumanshu
05-25-2009, 02:12 AM
I do own a Guitalele and just love it. I'm now having a Koaloha D-VI which is the guitalele but Koaloha flavor!!!

I also own a lot of ukes, such as MP customs, Koaloha, Pahu Kani custom, etc....

And now I mostly play the Koaloha or guitalele since it gives me a few more bass strings.

Some might say why don't i plai guitar instead... Well, I just never like guitar because of it size. I always feel that it was just too big for me and just never get used to that.

So when I found the guitale or koaloha DV6, I just knew that it was what I was looking for!!

I'm also ver intrigued by th requinto, a local store here have one that is handmade in Spain and I'm just so tempted by it!! It plays exactly like a guitalele or the DV6 but fuller since the body is bigger..

but for sure I'll own a requinto one of these days if not today since I'll go tryit later during the day!!

Lori
05-25-2009, 06:15 AM
I found these luthiers in Los Angeles. They have all kinds of interesting Mexican guitars. If you are worried about shipping costs, you might consider one from Los Angeles, were the Mexican culture is pretty strong.
http://www.candelas.com/requintos.php

–Lori

Ahnko Honu
05-25-2009, 10:21 AM
WOW, I just found out about these 4 string Requinto Jarocho and I'm really excited for some reason. :D
http://www.artesalazar.com/requinto-jarocho.html
http://us.st12.yimg.com/us.st.yimg.com/I/yhst-90038644061660_2042_3351988
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=phN0QgNFYHQ
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AbPwKwa545k
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C-G2Fe9F9fg

fumanshu
05-25-2009, 10:25 AM
Lori wote:
I found these luthiers in Los Angeles. They have all kinds of interesting Mexican guitars. If you are worried about shipping costs, you might consider one from Los Angeles, were the Mexican culture is pretty strong.
http://www.candelas.com/requintos.php

I heard that Candelas is making some nice ukes. I think it's what UkuleleBart is playing with. It seems to have that spanish touch to it!

Ahnko Honu
05-25-2009, 10:35 AM
Here's a Jarana Mosquito! Sort of a soprano Taropatch 'ukulele.
http://ep.yimg.com/ip/I/yhst-90038644061660_2059_572596
http://www.artesalazar.com/jarana-mosquito.html
http://us.st12.yimg.com/us.st.yimg.com/I/yhst-90038644061660_2042_2897991
Lousy video but you get the idea of the sound:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bLuTk4rnE3Y

GVlog
04-23-2010, 07:03 PM
This is an old topic but I thought I'd post some info in case anyone is interested. (fumanshu and I seem to have an interest in similar kinds of instruments)

Requintos are bigger than baritone ukuleles. Typical scale of a requinto is 530-540mm (short) or 575-580mm (long). A baritone ukulele is usually 480mm. The larger soundboard and deep body of the requinto (4" or slightly more) gives it a tone closer to a guitar that has been capoed at the 5th fret.

I tried the Lucida requinto once (a Chinese-made import, $150 for solid-top model). The nut is too narrow (1-7/8") and the body is a bit shallow for a Mexican requinto. The body is acceptable for for a Spanish requinto. The production quality is so-so. I don't recommend it.

I've put in an order for the Oscar Schmidt requinto (another Chinese-made import, solid cedar top, $225). It will arrive in about 2 weeks. If anyone is interested, I can report on its specs and quality. From what I gathered, it's probably closer to a proper Mexican requinto. If it doesn't turn out that great, then I'll probably just buy a Paracho-made requinto from one of my local shops.

Cordoba has a "requinto" (also Chinese-made, $250) but it's really a student's 1/2-sized classical guitar tuned to ADGCEA. You can get an amped cutaway version with a matte finish if you buy Cordoba's La Playa Travel Nylon String ($280).

If you're comfortable with the ukulele and prefer its tone and shorter sustain (percussiveness), then your best option is a guitarlele, guitalele or U-tar.

I talked with the folks at Kanilea regarding their guitarlele and my guess is that its tone will fall somewhere between an ukulele and a requinto. It would make a nice fingerstyle guitarlele because its string spacing is about the same as that for a classical guitar.

didgeridoo2
04-23-2010, 07:26 PM
This is an interesting and timely thread. Tomorrow I have an appointment to see some guitars and ukes and he specializes in all kinds of guitars. Even requintos. He's a wealth of knowledge and I'll make sure to ask to see some of his collection. His website is http://www.fernandezmusic.com/RequintoGuitars.html

GVlog
04-23-2010, 07:40 PM
This is an interesting and timely thread. Tomorrow I have an appointment to see some guitars and ukes and he specializes in all kinds of guitars. Even requintos. He's a wealth of knowledge and I'll make sure to ask to see some of his collection.
Yes. Ron's one of the "old hands". I already missed two opportunities to visit him though we've talked on the phone.

When you get there, play his "Professor" series guitars if he has one. They're rather good. The Esteve 8's and 9's should also be quite nice.

Spooner
04-23-2010, 07:54 PM
A Requinto I don't have.
I did pick up a custom cavaquinho.
I figured I needed to get in touch with my ukulele's ancestor.
Cavs are great.
The typical tuning is sweet and you can also (with a different set of strings for tension reasons) tune it up like a 4 string mando.
Heavenly!

SailingUke
04-23-2010, 08:07 PM
I found these luthiers in Los Angeles. They have all kinds of interesting Mexican guitars. If you are worried about shipping costs, you might consider one from Los Angeles, were the Mexican culture is pretty strong.
http://www.candelas.com/requintos.php

–Lori

Candelas makes first class instruments. I have played a few of their ukuleles and several custom guitars all totally awesome.
I have a KoAloha D-VI, it is a tenor uke, same size & scale. Much smaller than a requinto. The tuning is the same ADGCEA. (EADGBE guitar capoed at the fifth).

fumanshu
04-24-2010, 12:53 AM
GVlog wrote:
This is an old topic but I thought I'd post some info in case anyone is interested. (fumanshu and I seem to have an interest in similar kinds of instruments)

Requintos are bigger than baritone ukuleles. Typical scale of a requinto is 530-540mm (short) or 575-580mm (long). A baritone ukulele is usually 480mm. The larger soundboard and deep body of the requinto (4" or slightly more) gives it a tone closer to a guitar that has been capoed at the 5th fret.

I tried the Lucida requinto once (a Chinese-made import, $150 for solid-top model). The nut is too narrow (1-7/8") and the body is a bit shallow for a Mexican requinto. The body is acceptable for for a Spanish requinto. The production quality is so-so. I don't recommend it.

I've put in an order for the Oscar Schmidt requinto (another Chinese-made import, solid cedar top, $225). It will arrive in about 2 weeks. If anyone is interested, I can report on its specs and quality. From what I gathered, it's probably closer to a proper Mexican requinto. If it doesn't turn out that great, then I'll probably just buy a Paracho-made requinto from one of my local shops.

Cordoba has a "requinto" (also Chinese-made, $250) but it's really a student's 1/2-sized classical guitar tuned to ADGCEA. You can get an amped cutaway version with a matte finish if you buy Cordoba's La Playa Travel Nylon String ($280).

If you're comfortable with the ukulele and prefer its tone and shorter sustain (percussiveness), then your best option is a guitarlele, guitalele or U-tar.

I talked with the folks at Kanilea regarding their guitarlele and my guess is that its tone will fall somewhere between an ukulele and a requinto. It would make a nice fingerstyle guitarlele because its string spacing is about the same as that for a classical guitar.

Hi GVlog!!! You and I effectively have some kind of interest for similar intruments!!! I'll just make a little report of what I've got in terms of guitarlele.

Actually, I do have a Yamaha GL-1, a Koaloha DV-I, Kanile'a GL-6 and the Mele guitarlele. So as you guys can see, I have almost everything that are produce in that kind of instruments.

And to be honest, the Koaloha DV-I and Kanilea GL-6 are by far the best in this category. Now which one is better, it's very hard to say because they are 2 different instruments.

I think for someone who is alreadu used to play a tenor uke, the best is Koaloha DV-I becasue the body is excatly the same their tenor uke and the neck is the excat same scale as their tenor neck too except that it is wider to handle 6 strings.

So it's very similar to a uke but with 2 extra bass strings and lots of possiblity and potential.

The Kanilea GL-6 on the other hand used a super tenor body which is a tenor body with a wider bout and the neck is a baritone scale neck. I personnaly think that the spacing respect more the guitar spacing so it might be easier when it comes to 6 strings. I think gor a guitarist, it might be easier to play because of the scale.

Now as for the sound, I think they both sound good. The Koaloha sounds a lot like their uke but with more basses and even with their tenor body, you get very nice bottom end register. Once you get used with the instrument, you can really create some very complexe sounds from this instrument.

As for the kanilea, you have a very cristalline sound in the high register, very kind of high-fidelity sound and a lot of deep basses because the way the body is made. I would say the sound is bigger, you have more presence. If you are notsitting in front of the person who is playing the instrument, you might be fool and think that the sound you hear comes from a much bigger instrument!!

That said, it's 2 very excellent instrument, but they are just different animal, I do play with both because each one gives me what the other can't do!

Freak as I am, I have a custom guitarlele that will be completed soon!!! Since I'm just tired of all koa gutiarlele, I wanted something different, somthing like a Negra Flamenca guitarlele!!!! haahahah!!! So here's a pic of how it does look so far!!! Hope you like it!!

http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c212/bao1975/sigman-2.jpg

Thanks

harpdog
04-24-2010, 12:55 AM
I've lusted for a requinto on and off for years - because I love nylon string guitar and the Mexican sound, and have always been drawn to small guitars, though mine are mostly large size.
I had a Tacoma Papoose (short scale, size of a bari uke, A tuned) steel string, and it was a fun and sweet voice.
But, I'd like a Requinto - as a guitar voice.

GVlog
04-24-2010, 04:55 AM
As for the kanilea, you have a very cristalline sound in the high register, very kind of high-fidelity sound and a lot of deep basses because the way the body is made. I would say the sound is bigger, you have more presence. If you are notsitting in front of the person who is playing the instrument, you might be fool and think that the sound you hear comes from a much bigger instrument!!
I haven't played the Kanilea but I have played one of their super-tenor ukuleles. I concluded that it would sound closer to a requinto because of the larger lower bout. The string spacing that the Souza's chose to use is excellent IMHO. I would say that your hands-on assessment validates my conclusions.

I'm tempted to buy one, but the music I would play on it wouldn't even make-up 10% of my current repertoire. Maybe sometime in the future.



Since I'm just tired of all koa gutiarlele, I wanted something different, somthing like a Negra Flamenca guitarlele!!!! haahahah!!! So here's a pic of how it does look so far!!!
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c212/bao1975/sigman-2.jpg
Beautiful instrument! Judging from the flower arrangement in the photograph, the luthier must be William King. What spruce did he recommend for the top? I'm assuming the back and sides are rosewood or is he using cocobolo?

GVlog
04-24-2010, 04:57 AM
I had a Tacoma Papoose (short scale, size of a bari uke, A tuned) steel string, and it was a fun and sweet voice.
You had a Tacoma Papoose? And you parted with it? :(

Quel dommage!

fumanshu
04-24-2010, 02:35 PM
GVlog wrote:
What spruce did he recommend for the top? I'm assuming the back and sides are rosewood or is he using cocobolo?

Hu GV! This is a Brazilian Rosewood with Engelmann spruce top!!! It's gonna be my first uke with the the holy grail Brazilian Rosewood!!!!! Well I wanted that classic Negra Flamenca wood combo, it costs extra money for that brazilian Rosewood but I think it worth it!



Thanks

GVlog
04-24-2010, 03:53 PM
This is a Brazilian Rosewood with Engelmann spruce top!!!
Very good choices. You went all out with that combination. I don't think it can be topped.

Adirondack spruce is supposedly also a prime choice but I understand that it gives a different tone.

fumanshu
04-24-2010, 04:29 PM
GVlog wrote:
Very good choices. You went all out with that combination. I don't think it can be topped.

Adirondack spruce is supposedly also a prime choice but I understand that it gives a different tone.

Well, I heard a lot of good things wit Adirondack....but I just never try it so, I just went for a sure shot combo!!!

By the way, I've try a Raimundo Requinto, it's not bad, but I prefer my Kanilea, tone is just better if you find a nice strings combo to fit with the instrument.

By the way, you should also consider the custom kanilea GL-6, it's not much more expensive and you can get whatever you want as wood combo...

thanks

maikii
11-24-2010, 10:33 PM
Well, has it occurred to you that it doesn't sound as good as a guitar, because you have it tuned like a guitar? For the notes a guitar is tuned to, the larger body sounds better.

The guitalele is supposed to be tuned a fourth higher. You might like the sound better that way.


Hmm, never heard of the Requinto. But I do own a Mele Guitarlele. Its riding in an old Kamaka-style baritone case. I can tell you that it blows away the Yamaha Guitarlele. I have mine tuned to EADGBE, but the strings are a bit pretty loose, and I might be able to crank it up 5 half-steps, but I have never tried it, and know that I'm too cheap and lazy to replace strings.

But my overall assessment of my Mele, which retails for something like 700 is that the guitarlele really is not that good of a compromise between guitar and uke. Granted, I prefer the sound of steel strings over nylon classical strings. But really, after playing a full size guitar, ones that retail for half of what the mele goes for, the Mele just cannot compete. Yes, this is an apples to oranges comparison, but still...the overall instrument just isn't a very enjoyable experience IMO.

The cool part is that you can play it with your right hand pretty much just like a uke, with you regular strum pattern and chunking and everything. And it's a cool way to learn guitar chords if you're making the transition. But really, the sound just doesn't do it for me. I just brought mine out and gave it a few strums, and I'd say the sound isn't as full as a guitar, and not as bright and precise as a uke. Yeah, I can't really describe it, but Ahnko, if you happen to have a good electric bass or a solid-wood Taylor/Martin acoustic cuitar lying around in your closet, I might be willing to trade.

maikii
11-24-2010, 10:41 PM
A couple questions on Requintos--

Of course they are smaller than a full size guitar, with a shorter neck. But what about the width of the neck? Still quite playable by adult hands? (I tried a 1/2 size classical guitar, and it was difficult for my adult hands to play, clearly child-size) I'm wondering if a requinto has a wider neck.

What strings are avaialble for requinto, and which do you think are the best, and why?

Anyone tried the Parocho Elite Del Rio requinto, handmade in Mexico, solid cedar top, available from some vendors at under $200?

What about the much cheaper Lucida?

THank you,.

jgeary
01-01-2011, 05:06 PM
Does anyone know the nut width of the Yamaha GL-1 vs. some of the other guitaleles? Is the string spacing wide enough to comfortably fingerpick and/or chord?
Mahalo!
Jill

maikii
02-18-2011, 11:12 PM
I've put in an order for the Oscar Schmidt requinto (another Chinese-made import, solid cedar top, $225). It will arrive in about 2 weeks. If anyone is interested, I can report on its specs and quality.

GVlog---yes please report on the Oscar Schmidt Requinto (I assume model # OH30S), solid cedar top. I am thinking of buying that exact model. Everything you can say about it--including quality, workmanship, sound, playability, etc. Did you need to bring it somewhere for setup, or was the action, etc. good "out-of-the box"?

Thank you for your input.

Uke Republic
02-19-2011, 01:43 AM
The Aria we carry is 2" at nut
Does anyone know the nut width of the Yamaha GL-1 vs. some of the other guitaleles? Is the string spacing wide enough to comfortably fingerpick and/or chord?
Mahalo!
Jill

maikii
02-21-2011, 07:54 AM
The Aria we carry is 2" at nut

Tell us more about the Aria ATU120/6. I have seen it online, but would like to know more about it.

How does it compare with the Yamaha GL-1? Is it also tenor body? What scale? Solid top? How does it sound? Comparison to the GL-1 sound? Is the action, etc., usually good right out of the box, or does it need additional setup?

------------

PS GVlog, still waiting for your response about the Oscar Schmidt Requinto, if you are still reading.

Ken of York
02-21-2011, 11:18 AM
Hi Jill,

The Yamaha GL-1 is 1 7/8" at the nut (that is one and seven eighths inches). I find finger picking is fine but some chord shapes are a bit difficult. Take say the A or B major chord shapes on a normal guitar, it is quite hard for me to fit three fingers on adjacent strings with the GL-1, I try to shortcut it with a mini barre but it isn't always appropriate if the melody demands a series of arpeggios then things can get a bit dull and buzzy!

maikii
02-21-2011, 11:27 AM
Here's a Jarana Mosquito! Sort of a soprano Taropatch 'ukulele.
http://ep.yimg.com/ip/I/yhst-90038644061660_2059_572596
http://www.artesalazar.com/jarana-mosquito.html
http://us.st12.yimg.com/us.st.yimg.com/I/yhst-90038644061660_2042_2897991
Lousy video but you get the idea of the sound:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bLuTk4rnE3Y

I really like that jarocho music!

That mosquito looks interesting, and less expensive than the others.

Four doubled courses. Do you know how they are tuned?

warndt
08-18-2011, 08:53 PM
GVlog wrote:

Hu GV! This is a Brazilian Rosewood with Engelmann spruce top!!! It's gonna be my first uke with the the holy grail Brazilian Rosewood!!!!! Well I wanted that classic Negra Flamenca wood combo, it costs extra money for that brazilian Rosewood but I think it worth it!



Thanks

Fumanshu...How would you compare the sound/playability of your custom William King to your Kanilea GL-6 Guitarlele?

Thanks,
William