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Martinlover
03-05-2019, 04:50 PM
I am interested to know what microphones people are using to record your vocals and/or instrumentals. Does anyone know what kind of mics are being used for The Ukulele Site (HMS) recordings?

kohanmike
03-05-2019, 08:34 PM
The Shure SM58 is probably the most used recording mic in the world.

This is Michael Kohan in Los Angeles, Beverly West near the Beverly Center
9 tenor cutaway ukes, 5 acoustic bass ukes, 11 solid body bass ukes, 9 mini electric bass guitars (Total: 34)

• Donate to The Ukulele Kids Club, they provide ukuleles to children in hospital music therapy programs. www.theukc.org
• Member The CC Strummers: YouTube: www.youtube.com/user/CCStrummers/video, Facebook: www.facebook.com/TheCCStrummers

Croaky Keith
03-05-2019, 10:36 PM
I use a USB mic into audacity to record on Linux. :)

Mine is a Samson (Meteor, I think) & cost £40 about 2 years ago.

Edit: It is a condenser mic.

Jerryc41
03-06-2019, 01:27 AM
His name eludes my at the moment, but the reviewer in Virginia records with an iPhone and a separate mic, I believe. I used to know the details. (Big help, right? :) )

Vic Schmeltz - "Recorded with an iRig Mic Studio microphone and iPhone 6."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ahhXO8MMg7M

hendulele
03-06-2019, 01:38 AM
The Blue Snowball USB mic works quite well for not much money.

Jerryc41
03-06-2019, 01:45 AM
The Blue Snowball USB mic works quite well for not much money.

I like the looks!

DownUpDave
03-06-2019, 02:59 AM
First question is budget??? Next is what kind of equipment do you have already. If you have a computer or laptop then a USB mic is the way to go. There are many depending on how much you want to spend. A condenser Mic will pick up both your vocals and your instrument at the same time wnile 12"-24" or farther away. The Shure 58 recommended above is really only for singing into. Those are dynamic mics and you pretty much have to get your lips right on top of it.

RafterGirl
03-06-2019, 03:03 AM
There was a thread on this subject not long ago with lots of recommendations. I got the Shure MV88 and use it with my iPhone. Works well. I'm still in the learning process on how to get the most out of it.

gochugogi
03-06-2019, 06:51 AM
I am interested to know what microphones people are using to record your vocals and/or instrumentals. Does anyone know what kind of mics are being used for The Ukulele Site (HMS) recordings?

I see some really expensive small and large condenser mics in the HMS videosólike 5 grand per stereo pair! I like recording with a matched pair of Neumann KM-184. The ain't cheap but are a dad burn bargain compared to what I see dangling on the HMS videos. And the KM-184 sound wonderful for ukulele and guitar. However, any decent set of pencil or small diaphragm mics are good for ukulele. You might want to check out a set of the Rode NT5óNeumann like tone at 1/3 the price. The Shure SM81 is another really good small diaphragm mic for guitar and ukulele tracking.

Brad Bordessa
03-06-2019, 07:07 AM
Ditto on the Neumann KM-184. Used one on my album along with an SM7B for vocals.

An SM57 can be great for uke, but you've really got to have a decent preamp (or at least, a Cloudlifter) to make it work.

Re: HMS - FWIW, Andrew has stupid expensive mics AND stupid expensive preamps. The pairing makes for his super-duper sounds.

gochugogi
03-06-2019, 07:26 AM
I just took a quick peek at a couple of the HMS videos and recognized a pair Schoeps CMC 6 and a large diaphragm Neumann (not sure which model). Dream mics....

Joyful Uke
03-06-2019, 07:52 AM
First question is budget??? Next is what kind of equipment do you have already. If you have a computer or laptop then a USB mic is the way to go. There are many depending on how much you want to spend. A condenser Mic will pick up both your vocals and your instrument at the same time wnile 12"-24" or farther away. The Shure 58 recommended above is really only for singing into. Those are dynamic mics and you pretty much have to get your lips right on top of it.

I'm not even up to beginner level in terms of learning about this type of thing, so I found this interesting. Some mics are better for vocals, and some are better for instruments?
When people post their suggestions, could they also include if it's better for instruments or vocals? I do want to some day get a microphone (and figure out what else I need) for recording fingerpicking on ukulele, with no vocals, but still have no clue where to start.

gochugogi
03-06-2019, 09:14 AM
I'd want a separate mic for the ukulele—small diaphragm—and a large diaphragm mic for vocals. I'd record the backing tracks first and add the lead instrument and/or vocals afterwards. If you have only one flavor of mic—and we've all been there—you can diddle the mic position and EQ to optimize the sound. The Shure SM58 stage mic is optimized for live vocals and has a huge contour bump in the lower highs that make ukuleles and guitars sound a bit bright 'n twangy, so lots of PP work to make it sound decent. If you want a good do everything mic, spring for a large diaphragm condenser mic, rather than a small diaphragm model. Rode has a series of somewhat affordable large diaphragm condenser mic that sound nice. if you have a little more bread to burn, the Neumann TLM 102 MT (their budget diaphragm condenser) sounds wonderful for both instruments and voice. I love using it on classical guitar tracks.

Martinlover
03-06-2019, 01:58 PM
First question is budget??? Next is what kind of equipment do you have already. If you have a computer or laptop then a USB mic is the way to go. There are many depending on how much you want to spend. A condenser Mic will pick up both your vocals and your instrument at the same time wnile 12"-24" or farther away. The Shure 58 recommended above is really only for singing into. Those are dynamic mics and you pretty much have to get your lips right on top of it.

Thanks for the feedback. My problem has been that I donít know the technical terms are for what I want. I have some USB mics that are pretty good. And I already have the Shure 58. I am looking for a mic that I donít have to be on top of and youíve given me the keywords to start my search: condenser mic.

Martinlover
03-06-2019, 02:00 PM
I see some really expensive small and large condenser mics in the HMS videosólike 5 grand per stereo pair! I like recording with a matched pair of Neumann KM-184. The ain't cheap but are a dad burn bargain compared to what I see dangling on the HMS videos. And the KM-184 sound wonderful for ukulele and guitar. However, any decent set of pencil or small diaphragm mics are good for ukulele. You might want to check out a set of the Rode NT5óNeumann like tone at 1/3 the price. The Shure SM81 is another really good small diaphragm mic for guitar and ukulele tracking.

Thanks, will do. I guess I have expensive taste and no budget to back it up.

Martinlover
03-06-2019, 02:02 PM
Ditto on the Neumann KM-184. Used one on my album along with an SM7B for vocals.

An SM57 can be great for uke, but you've really got to have a decent preamp (or at least, a Cloudlifter) to make it work.

Re: HMS - FWIW, Andrew has stupid expensive mics AND stupid expensive preamps. The pairing makes for his super-duper sounds.

I knew it had to be something that gets that “raw” sound.

Martinlover
03-06-2019, 02:04 PM
I'd want a separate mic for the ukulele—small diaphragm—and a large diaphragm mic for vocals. I'd record the backing tracks first and add the lead instrument and/or vocals afterwards. If you have only one flavor of mic—and we've all been there—you can diddle the mic position and EQ to optimize the sound. The Shure SM58 stage mic is optimized for live vocals and has a huge contour bump in the lower highs that make ukuleles and guitars sound a bit bright 'n twangy, so lots of PP work to make it sound decent. If you want a good do everything mic, spring for a large diaphragm condenser mic, rather than a small diaphragm model. Rode has a series of somewhat affordable large diaphragm condenser mic that sound nice. if you have a little more bread to burn, the Neumann TLM 102 MT (their budget diaphragm condenser) sounds wonderful for both instruments and voice. I love using it on classical guitar tracks.

I’m going to be in for sticker shock, I’m sure.
Thanks everyone, I have a couple starting points to begin my search.

frolicks
03-07-2019, 03:30 AM
For recording at home, in a quiet surrounding, you definitely go for a condenser mic, that‘s absolutely correct. And the mentioned Australian company Rode (or more precise: RÝde) is a very good place to look at. I have both, a large diaphragm condenser, Rode NT-1000, as well as a pair of small diaphragm mics for stereo recordings, the NT-5. Here in Europe, both are more or less in the same price range. For finger picking I‘d recommend a small diaphragm condenser, or even a pair of them, for stereo sound.
But of course, there are many other companies out there. And helpful books like „AUdio recordings for Dummies“. I have that, too. It‘s a nice introduction for the very clueless, like I was a couple of years back. I‘m still quite far away from being even beyond the level of beginnner, in this field. But it‘s anouther interesting field you can keep learning new things every day.

anthonyg
03-07-2019, 05:06 PM
Thanks for the feedback. My problem has been that I donít know the technical terms are for what I want. I have some USB mics that are pretty good. And I already have the Shure 58. I am looking for a mic that I donít have to be on top of and youíve given me the keywords to start my search: condenser mic.

Do you have a microphone interface/preamp/converter unit?
What do you intend to record to?
Your computer or something else?
Do you have a computer software program (DAW (Digital audio workstation))?

If you want to go past just using a USB microphone into your computer (nothing wrong with this really) then your opening up a HUGE can of worms.
As far as some recording microphones go then iSK is an inexpensive brand that just blows most of the competition out of the water.
There's no point in using a Neumann over an iSK until you really know what you are doing and in fact some that are in the know, WILL still use an iSK over a Neumann.