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fretie
03-08-2019, 05:47 PM
I know lots of peeps on here on UU have generously gifted ukes to others so Iím here to ask that you offer some of your thoughts and experiences youíve had while sharing your love of the jumping flea in such a concrete way.

I have a custom mango soprano uke that I would like to give to a member of our local uke circle. The player I have in mind is a shy older gal who has played weekly at our uke meetups for the past three or four years. She currently is playing her original budget soprano uke whose tuners no longer are holding the string tension. I have tried to repair the tuners and it was then that I thought that rather than sell my soprano which I now am not playing much because of having gravitated to tenors, I could give it to this fellow uker to replace her failing instrument.

Kenn2018
03-08-2019, 05:57 PM
Sell it to her for a very modest amount. Like $20. That way she does not feel like it's charity or that she is beholden. Tell her you got a great deal on it and since you know from working on them the tuners are shot on her's, you'd like to pass the deal on to her.

Graham Greenbag
03-09-2019, 12:01 AM
I know lots of peeps on here on UU have generously gifted ukes to others so I’m here to ask that you offer some of your thoughts and experiences you’ve had while sharing your love of the jumping flea in such a concrete way.

I have a custom mango soprano uke that I would like to give to a member of our local uke circle. The player I have in mind is a shy older gal who has played weekly at our uke meetups for the past three or four years. She currently is playing her original budget soprano uke whose tuners no longer are holding the string tension. I have tried to repair the tuners and it was then that I thought that rather than sell my soprano which I now am not playing much because of having gravitated to tenors, I could give it to this fellow uker to replace her failing instrument.

What you propose is very generous and I hope that you are able to do something for your club mate.

Gifting items to people can sometimes be problematic so it’s best to find your way forward carefully and treat each case individually - no one solution suits all. One way forward would be to let your friend borrow your Uke for a few weeks and then, if she likes it, suggest that you do a swop. You would get the pleasure of seeing your Uke used and have a back-up Soprano (her old one) for when you fancied playing one (replace the machine heads with new at your leisure). She would feel like she had contributed to the deal and wouldn’t have her old Uke taking up space at home, etc.

I gifted an unused Uke to a club member and she played it for a couple more years before personal circumstances stopped her playing; IIRC I ‘loaned’ it to her at first and then said that I didn’t expect to get it back. When she gave up she sought me out and returned the Uke with many thanks, I got hold of her original Soprano Uke and gave it a darn good set-up such that if circumstances allow her return or she wants to play at home then she can and on something that now plays reasonably well.

fretie
03-09-2019, 04:40 PM
Some good ideas here, thanks for your suggestions.

Chopped Liver
03-09-2019, 05:18 PM
It's a lovely idea! I like the idea of you "loaning it to her" indefinitely instead of selling it to her. She will know it's worth more than a small amount and may refuse the offer of a cheap sale. Or you could just be honest with her and tell her hers is beat and you want to give her one that you never play anymore because you are not playing sopranos now. You could ask her if she'd be willing to take it off your hands and give it a good home.

fretie
03-09-2019, 05:37 PM
..... Or you could just be honest with her and tell her hers is beat and you want to give her one that you never play anymore because you are not playing sopranos now. You could ask her if she'd be willing to take it off your hands and give it a good home.

Yup, that’s kind of what I was thinking....

Jerryc41
03-10-2019, 03:45 AM
Very nice idea. Giving is nice, but accepting can be difficult. The idea of selling it for $20 sounds reasonable.

ScooterD35
03-10-2019, 04:07 AM
It's a lovely idea! I like the idea of you "loaning it to her" indefinitely instead of selling it to her. She will know it's worth more than a small amount and may refuse the offer of a cheap sale. Or you could just be honest with her and tell her hers is beat and you want to give her one that you never play anymore because you are not playing sopranos now. You could ask her if she'd be willing to take it off your hands and give it a good home.

As an addendum to this idea, you could give it to her with the understanding that it’s a “pay-it-forward”
Kind of deal. It’s her Uke to do with as she pleases, however, if she ever decides she doesn’t need/want/play it any more she can’t sell it. Instead she should pass it along to the next new player in need of a good instrument.

Scooter

Rllink
03-10-2019, 04:38 AM
This is just me, but I would just offer give her the uke and tell her that it is better than the one she has. Tell her you don't want it anymore. I don't like playing games and trying to trick her into taking it by selling it to her. She will take it or she will decline. It is really up to her. As Jerry says, sometimes accepting can be difficult, and that is especially true if someone is trying to give them something they don't want. That's my opinion on it.

Kenn2018
03-10-2019, 11:39 AM
I have to revise my opinion and agree that telling her that her ukulele is shot, and offering your custom mango; one you no longer play, as a replacement. It's a better option than selling it to her for a token price.

The only caveat is be prepared for her to get prickly about accepting "charity." It's a cultural and a generational thing.

fretie
03-10-2019, 12:37 PM
I have to revise my opinion and agree that telling her that her ukulele is shot, and offering your custom mango; one you no longer play, as a replacement. It's a better option than selling it to her for a token price.

The only caveat is be prepared for her to get prickly about accepting "charity." It's a cultural and a generational thing.

Yes, I will definitely tread lightly!

saltytri
03-10-2019, 12:56 PM
You could tell her that you value and appreciate her consistent participation in a musical get-together that you and so many of your friends enjoy. You have an instrument that isn't getting played much and you'd like her try it out. If she'd like, she can be its caretaker for as long as she wants. If she doesn't need it at some time down the road she can get it back to you or pass it on to someone who will enjoy and take care of it. The low cost sale approach doesn't make much sense to me and doesn't change in any positive way the essential nature of the gift. Of course, you'd put this all in your own truly sincere words.

What a great thing to do for a genuine win-win! Good on ya!

natchez
03-11-2019, 05:26 AM
You could tell her that you value and appreciate her consistent participation in a musical get-together that you and so many of your friends enjoy. You have an instrument that isn't getting played much and you'd like her try it out. If she'd like, she can be its caretaker for as long as she wants. If she doesn't need it at some time down the road she can get it back to you or pass it on to someone who will enjoy and take care of it. The low cost sale approach doesn't make much sense to me and doesn't change in any positive way the essential nature of the gift. Of course, you'd put this all in your own truly sincere words.

What a great thing to do for a genuine win-win! Good on ya!

I'm with this bunch. The truth is always better, and much easier to remember :)

70sSanO
03-11-2019, 08:49 AM
I think you are over thinking this. You see someone who has a need and you are helping her out. I have gifted stuff over the years to various ages, including a 75yo, and it has worked out fine. What is the worst that can happen?

Just tell her what you told us... her ukulele doesn’t stay in tune and you have a ukulele that you don’t use.

John

70sSanO
03-11-2019, 09:02 AM
The one bit of “advice” I will give is that once you gift it, don’t ask about it, or if she likes it, etc. Just act as though it never happened. I had someone bring up a surfboard I gave him every time I saw him, I just said, “That’s good,” or “I’m glad it’s working out.” I tried to minimize the conversation about it and talk about anything else. After a while it was a non-event and when he brought it up it he accepted it as his board and not still mine. Now we can talk about surfing without an obligation of gratefulness.

John

NewKid
03-11-2019, 04:42 PM
I’ve gifted three ukes including my very best one to fellow club members and I’ve always offered the instruments directly as a token of my respect and affection for them. Other than all three friends thinking I was crazy, they accepted the ukes happily. One friend emailed about whether it would be okay for her to sell the uke I gave her, and I said nothing would make happier than her getting as much money as possible for it.

I agree that once the instrument is gifted that you should forget about it and really let it go. No strings attached!

Bill Sheehan
03-12-2019, 03:58 AM
I'm with this bunch. The truth is always better, and much easier to remember :)

Hahahahaha! Love your philosophy, Natchez!

ukeinfused
03-15-2019, 08:32 AM
Just gift it in your own way, no (well, four only) strings attached! :)
It will be fine! (actually better than fine: down right wonderful).
If your friend needs to negotiate this gift for her own comfort, she'll let you know.

Besides my own dozen or so, I collect some to pass on to others. My wife has dubbed me "the Ukulele Fairy".
There is nothing better than saying "I love the uke and I'd like you to have this one."
Your wonderful gift of your own personal custom uke makes this even better!