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Kibes37
03-12-2019, 08:47 PM
Foam Rollers... They are fantastic in general, but really come in handy before and after relatively long sessions. Every time I sit down to play and I forget, my back quickly reminds me and I jet over to it. After that I am ready to dig in. Once done practicing, my back snaps itself back to into comfort like bubble wrap under a car tire. Stretching obviously is amazing, but I have a deep seeded bond with my foam roller.

Just thought I’d toss that out. They are around $20-$25. Different colors mean different firmness. I use black (most firm) for my back. I use blue (softest I think) for my legs after long bike rides.


Side note: I have no back issues in general except bad posture.

Col50
03-12-2019, 11:37 PM
Back troubles suck big time.

Getting old sucks.

Playing Uke is a remedy for alleviating all ills and just looking at a Uke has to put a smile on anyones face as to how such a small looking instrument can produce such wonderful joy in listeners and players alike.

So now you know how to forget about all your woes ....... rock on with your Uke.

Martinlover
03-13-2019, 02:27 AM
I’ve been having some back issues linked to playing, as I tend to slump over the uke. I did try my foam roller the other day and it helped. Good suggestion.

Swamp Yankee
03-13-2019, 02:51 AM
Reading a "heads up" about foam rollers I couldn't help but think about my mother's hair care regimen when I was a child in the early 60s... back when Prell shampoo came in glass bottles and suburban mothers stunk the entire house up with Toni home perms.

Besides that... I find a strap really helps me to sit up as I play and not hunker over the uke, bending my back in the process.

Croaky Keith
03-13-2019, 04:06 AM
Never heard of them before - looked them up - some kind of gym equipment, but what are they really for?

Sharpshin
03-13-2019, 04:34 AM
Rollers and balls in different densities are used to increase blood flow to muscles and to keep the fascia surrounding the muscles mobile. Rolling reduces pain, and increases elasticity. If you can not afford myofascial release sessions and massage, but wished you could...this is the way to go! My posture is not great and my work makes it worse because I have to lean forward quite a lot causing all kinds of tightness in my hips and lower back. Learning how to roll out my body has allowed me to reduce inflammation, reduce consumption of ibuprofen, move easier, play ukulele longer, etc. I had a qualified fitness instructor show me how to roll away my pain and now I have the power to heal myself and therefore I get to keep doing the things I love. I started out rolling my feet and back and what a difference! Now I roll out many parts of my body before I do my stretching, then I do some stabilization movement to set myself up for a more pain free day. If you think pain is just the way it is and it is normal because you are getting so old...then I suggest you look into this. I still have pain but I think if I were more regular about my rolling out and evening out my muscles, I might have a even less! It isn't difficult to learn either. Stretching and rolling my hands for a minute or two is part of my ukulele playing routine.

Kibes37
03-13-2019, 06:01 AM
Rollers and balls in different densities are used to increase blood flow to muscles and to keep the fascia surrounding the muscles mobile. Rolling reduces pain, and increases elasticity. If you can not afford myofascial release sessions and massage, but wished you could...this is the way to go! My posture is not great and my work makes it worse because I have to lean forward quite a lot causing all kinds of tightness in my hips and lower back. Learning how to roll out my body has allowed me to reduce inflammation, reduce consumption of ibuprofen, move easier, play ukulele longer, etc. I had a qualified fitness instructor show me how to roll away my pain and now I have the power to heal myself and therefore I get to keep doing the things I love. I started out rolling my feet and back and what a difference! Now I roll out many parts of my body before I do my stretching, then I do some stabilization movement to set myself up for a more pain free day. If you think pain is just the way it is and it is normal because you are getting so old...then I suggest you look into this. I still have pain but I think if I were more regular about my rolling out and evening out my muscles, I might have a even less! It isn't difficult to learn either. Stretching and rolling my hands for a minute or two is part of my ukulele playing routine.


Great info.

Arcy
03-13-2019, 06:19 AM
Foam rolls are fantastic. Even better is to watch your posture when playing and not need them.

They do take some time to get used to, and you may want to talk to a pro about how to best to use one for your specific problems.


Part of my transition to the Ukulele was that my guitar was heavy enough to exacerbate back problems I was going through. I'm mostly past those (thanks to PT and foam rolls!), and if I'm careful I can generally avoid them: slumping and picking on the sofa leads back to the foam roll. Sitting up straight or standing with the instrument held properly (I use a strap to help enforce position) and I can go for hours.


Instruments get all of the sexy press and excitement, but my best musical purchase may be a guitar stool with a back and foot rests that I've set to keep me in a proper and comfortable position.

Kibes37
03-13-2019, 06:41 AM
I don’t think great posture while playing is the only answer. I still get sore when I hold my posture correct, just not as bad. Sitting in one position for hours sometimes is taxing. I stand and move around, but when I really get in the zone I don’t move much. Everybody could benefit from daily rolling.