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S11LKO
03-14-2019, 04:48 AM
I mess with guitar and ukulele, and I try my best vocally whilst doing so, AND I've done a few open mic nights which've sort of gone down ok.

I also have a few friends who are happy to get together now and again to make a noise with me, - even to the extent of hiring a rehearsal studio and being a 'band' for a few hours at a time - but NONE of them want to 'perform' in front of an audience; however small.

I know what we take from our music is (and should be) personal to each of us, but I really feel I'd like to get out there and 'do a few bits' publically with someone(s) else, but no matter where I've tried to find such a partner(s) - online searches, local clubs, etc., no one my age seems to be interested in anything apart from getting together privately in one of our homes and having a 'sing-song' there.

Has anyone here suffered with same, did you solve the 'problem', and how?

teninobob
03-14-2019, 05:17 AM
Is it 3 AM there dude? OK itís 8 oíclock in the morning here in the Pacific Northwest Iím having a coffee and yes Iím going to chime in here just to say that I doubt those that you would like to have play out somewhere with you will ever change their mind. Just keep doing open mic nights, you never know you might meet someone whoís looking to play. My first time in playing in front of people was a recital with auditorium full of parents and friends I was eight years old playing this giant K full size guitar, I nailed it I didnít even think I was going to be able to get through this song because I thought I was going to pass out. I looked over at my music teacher he looked at me and that son of a bitch said that was Great but it went so fast do it again. I did it again it did not go as well as the first time LOL and that messed me up for life. Everybody has their 15 minutes of fame, mine was playing a private party in Palm Desert California back in the 80s, forgot all about the gig my buddy comes over to my house and Iím kicking back having a beer and a couple other things it was the 80s you know, he asked me where my suit was I said I donít own a suit he raced home one I put the damn thing on we go to this deal Iím sitting there on a stool just miserable played for about an hour and 20 minutes, made my hundred bucks, and got the hell out of there. Some old lady there came up to me and said you play really well I looked at her and you could tell she felt just about the same way I did as being at this deal and I told her thanks a lot, I really appreciate it, she was the only person who said a thing to me in that hour and 20 minutes and my buddy came up to me and said do you know who that was? I said no, he said that was Greta Garbo. I have a picture of her on my wall in the house :-) so just keep doing what youíre doing there Dave itíll all come together cheers

Ukecaster
03-14-2019, 05:46 AM
Dave, I think you just gotta keep doing the open mics, running the ads, and talking with other musicians you run into, it will happen. Or, just move here to Boston, and we can go out as The Uke Brothers! 😂

I just finished up 7 years of weekend warrior gigging with a classic rock band on guitar, and I'm already getting the itch again.

Rllink
03-14-2019, 05:56 AM
Yes I have experienced what you are experiencing. I practiced Christmas songs with a couple others who were never going to play them for anyone else. I ended up playing them on a street corner in the freezing cold during a winter festival by myself. I started playing the ukulele because I wanted to share songs and sing for other people, hopefully encourage them to sing along. There was no working up to it. That's what I wanted to do and that is why I started playing. That was as much a part of it as learning to play a G chord or a C chord. As far as finding like minded people, I think that comes from getting yourself out there. Doing open mic, busking, getting gigs at farmer's markets, volunteering to play for children's programs, anywhere you can run into other musicians. I ran into a keyboard player when I was playing my ukulele for a Raising Readers children's program. It takes time and effort to get as much exposure as you can. One thing that you are not going to do is persuade people who are not drawn to share their music with an audience to do so. I've tried to do that. For whatever reason, they are content to do what they are doing. If you want to play with others and play for an audience, you got to find people who are already inclined to do so.

S11LKO
03-14-2019, 06:12 AM
Wow! Thanks everyone for your input; some great stories you have there, and I've taken all your advice based on your experiences on board. I'll keep going, as you suggest, because I really enjoy myself when doing it - and I long ago realised and accepted that some will listen and like what I do, and some will hate it.

We all have differing tastes, standards, and likes that we're willing to accept or not.

It's just so frustrating at times. Just as well I have you great crowd here on UU to help spur me along! lol

Rllink
03-14-2019, 06:14 AM
I mess with guitar and ukulele, and I try my best vocally whilst doing so, AND I've done a few open mic nights which've sort of gone down ok.

Has anyone here suffered with same, did you solve the 'problem', and how?

Another point to make. When you do open mics do you stick around when it is over, talk to the other musicians, make connections, try to be a part of that community? Even if you don't necessarily want to play with some nineteen year old keyboardist, that nineteen year old keyboardist might know some sixty year old ukulele or guitar player. It is good to get to know them. In Old San Juan, where I have done a lot of busking, most of the street performers there know each other and end up at the same bar after they are done. Another good place to hang out, especially if you've been out all afternoon singing your heart out and you have something in common to talk about. Anyway, I'm getting redundant here, any exposure that you can get with other musicians is good.

bacchettadavid
03-14-2019, 06:21 AM
Seconding Rllink's advice. Leave business cards in local music shops, create an online presence, promote yourself at local workshops and festivals, woodshed as much as you can, and perform on your own at every opportunity (be sure to voice your desires at every performance). Like-minded persons will come out of the woodwork eventually.

S11LKO
03-14-2019, 06:59 AM
Thanks again troops - a couple of ideas there new to me. Appreciated.

S11LKO
03-14-2019, 09:11 AM
I know Luke has just responded to this but his post seems to have disappeared?? D'oh!

Kenn2018
03-14-2019, 10:26 AM
Music shops are some of the best places to network (yes, that's what you're doing) to find other musicians looking to play at gigs. Talk to the owner, sales people, repair techs, everyone there. Most will know the local music scene and will most likely know a couple that are looking to put together a "band." Leave a flyer or card and write on it looking for others to play gigs. So that the person you talked to will remember which person was looking for band mates.

Small venues are also a good place. Ask the owner, manager, bar person if they know anyone.

Put up flyers on community, restaurant, pub, bank, church, music store, etc. bulletin boards. With tear off name and phone numbers or be humorous and say use your cell phone and take a pic so you don't forget about this amazing opportunity!

Talk to other players and ask them if they know anybody. They may surprise you and say they are interested. And don't ignore musicians who don't play the genre you are interested in. They may know someone who plays your kind of music.

Network, network, network.

S11LKO
03-14-2019, 10:40 AM
Music shops are some of the best places to network (yes, that's what you're doing) to find other musicians looking to play at gigs. Talk to the owner, sales people, repair techs, everyone there. Most will know the local music scene and will most likely know a couple that are looking to put together a "band." Leave a flyer or card and write on it looking for others to play gigs. So that the person you talked to will remember which person was looking for band mates.

Small venues are also a good place. Ask the owner, manager, bar person if they know anyone.

Put up flyers on community, restaurant, pub, bank, church, music store, etc. bulletin boards. With tear off name and phone numbers or be humorous and say use your cell phone and take a pic so you don't forget about this amazing opportunity!

Talk to other players and ask them if they know anybody. They may surprise you and say they are interested. And don't ignore musicians who don't play the genre you are interested in. They may know someone who plays your kind of music.

Network, network, network.

Thanks Ken2018 - lots of ideas there. I obviously haven't been as pro-active as I'd THOUGHT I'd been! Thanks mate.

Photodan
03-14-2019, 10:51 AM
Is it 3 AM there dude? OK itís 8 oíclock in the morning here in the Pacific Northwest Iím having a coffee and yes Iím going to chime in here just to say that I doubt those that you would like to have play out somewhere with you will ever change their mind. Just keep doing open mic nights, you never know you might meet someone whoís looking to play. My first time in playing in front of people was a recital with auditorium full of parents and friends I was eight years old playing this giant K full size guitar, I nailed it I didnít even think I was going to be able to get through this song because I thought I was going to pass out. I looked over at my music teacher he looked at me and that son of a bitch said that was Great but it went so fast do it again. I did it again it did not go as well as the first time LOL and that messed me up for life. Everybody has their 15 minutes of fame, mine was playing a private party in Palm Desert California back in the 80s, forgot all about the gig my buddy comes over to my house and Iím kicking back having a beer and a couple other things it was the 80s you know, he asked me where my suit was I said I donít own a suit he raced home one I put the damn thing on we go to this deal Iím sitting there on a stool just miserable played for about an hour and 20 minutes, made my hundred bucks, and got the hell out of there. Some old lady there came up to me and said you play really well I looked at her and you could tell she felt just about the same way I did as being at this deal and I told her thanks a lot, I really appreciate it, she was the only person who said a thing to me in that hour and 20 minutes and my buddy came up to me and said do you know who that was? I said no, he said that was Greta Garbo. I have a picture of her on my wall in the house :-) so just keep doing what youíre doing there Dave itíll all come together cheers

Best story I've heard in quite some time. I can't imagine a better post than this!

S11LKO
03-18-2019, 11:40 AM
Indeed. As I've chatted to members on here over the last few months, it's been very interesting to hear the musical careers, stories and experiences some of them have had. Makes me quite jealous at times...x