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Kimosabe
04-01-2019, 06:39 AM
Anyone here play the uke because itís easier than guitar or piano?

No, of course thatís not the reason I play uke. Just thought Iíd ask this April 1 question to get you all up in arms and excited and ready to leave your comments.

gochugogi
04-01-2019, 07:02 AM
I can say as a music teacher it's generally a lot easy to teach beginning ukulele than guitar!

Ukecaster
04-01-2019, 07:08 AM
Yes, with some age related hand issues popping up now, playing uke is much easier for me than guitar. In fact, until today, I hadn't played my guitars since December, and boy, the guitar fingerboard is much bigger and harder to navigate accurately now. I'm in the process of selling most of my electric guitars and amps. Hopefully, I'll be able to play ukes until NCD (New Coffin Day), which I won't be posting about :D

Rllink
04-01-2019, 07:16 AM
Yes, I decided to play the ukulele because it was easier to haul around than a guitar or a piano. Seriously, I never thought about learning to play piano, but I was going to play guitar. But then I found the ukulele and it would do everything that I wanted to do with the guitar and it was much easier and less hassle to transport around, so I went with the ukulele instead.

kerneltime
04-01-2019, 08:08 AM
Anyone here play the uke because it’s easier than guitar or piano?

No, of course that’s not the reason I play uke. Just thought I’d ask this April 1 question to get you all up in arms and excited and ready to leave your comments.

I would say convenience over ease.. piano is actually a bit easier to get started on but a lot harder to keep at it as it not really portable.

kohanmike
04-01-2019, 08:10 AM
I played guitar for almost fifty years, then about six years ago I bought a ukulele on a whim because it looked like my Fender Telecaster electric guitar and thought it would be cute as a wall hanger next to it. A couple of weeks later I got a postcard from the Los Angeles Music Center for their summer Play-Along seminars, which I had attended a couple of times for guitar, but this time it was for ukulele. Since I had one, I participated in the three Saturdays for six hours each day. that was all I needed to be convinced to go ukulele.

In the fifty years playing guitar, I bought four, in the six years playing uke and bass uke, I have thirty four, that should tell you where I am comparatively, I haven't touched my guitars since, so I gave my nephew my Telecaster and an Ibanez archtop jazz and I'm planning to sell an Ibanez exotic wood 6 string and an Ovation Applause 12 string.

This is Michael Kohan in Los Angeles, Beverly West near the Beverly Center
9 tenor cutaway ukes, 5 acoustic bass ukes, 11 solid body bass ukes, 9 mini electric bass guitars (Total: 34)

• Donate to The Ukulele Kids Club, they provide ukuleles to children in hospital music therapy programs. www.theukc.org
• Member The CC Strummers: YouTube: www.youtube.com/user/CCStrummers/video, Facebook: www.facebook.com/TheCCStrummers

Croaky Keith
04-01-2019, 08:20 AM
Well, with only 4 strings, it's a much better match to my hand than guitar or piano, but the uke is cheaper than both of those, so it might have gone through my mind..........& of course it's cute. ;)

UkingViking
04-01-2019, 08:21 AM
I play the ukulele because it is easier :-)

And more convenient.
I actually fooled around with piano/keyboard and guitar before buying an ukulele. Learned only a few tunes on each after years of rarely taking it up. With i ukulele learning new chords is easier than on guitar.
And a keyboard doesnt have the charm of a piano, which is too big and noisy for many homes.

With the Ukulele you can have an acoustic instrument which is small, can be strummed at a low er volume than playing a piano, and is great for simple arrangements.

Rllink
04-01-2019, 08:38 AM
I play the ukulele because it is easier :-)

And more convenient.
I actually fooled around with piano/keyboard and guitar before buying an ukulele. Learned only a few tunes on each after years of rarely taking it up. With i ukulele learning new chords is easier than on guitar.
And a keyboard doesnt have the charm of a piano, which is too big and noisy for many homes.

With the Ukulele you can have an acoustic instrument which is small, can be strummed at a low er volume than playing a piano, and is great for simple arrangements.

There is an open mic that I do twice a month at this little coffee shop where everyone is on top of everyone, and this guy shows up every time with a huge keyboard and a stand for it. He always shows up late, I think he comes after work and that makes him late, he drags it in, props it up in the back, and he is usually one of the last to play. So when it is his turn he has to hold it up over his head and he carries up front, then go back and get the stand, and then set it all up. Honestly, I feel sorry for the guy. He loves playing the keyboard, he makes up his own songs and sings them, but his setup is such a pain in the butt for him. I'm sure though, it is all worth it to him, but I watch him and I am tankful that all I have to carry up there is a ukulele.

captain-janeway
04-01-2019, 09:03 AM
Yes, with some age related hand issues popping up now, playing uke is much easier for me than guitar. In fact, until today, I hadn't played my guitars since December, and boy, the guitar fingerboard is much bigger and harder to navigate accurately now. I'm in the process of selling most of my electric guitars and amps. Hopefully, I'll be able to play ukes until NCD (New Coffin Day), which I won't be posting about :D

I'm with you. I just started uke about a year ago and can even handle the tenor uke I'd originally bought. The concert just fits better. Don't show vids of 6 yo shredding guitars. My fingers just aren't going to stretch like that (besides, my hands are probably about the same size lol).

peanuts56
04-01-2019, 09:07 AM
I took guitar class as well as keyboard for my Music Ed Degree. My main instrument was trumpet. I have absolutely no interest in guitar. I play keyboard fairly well but play almost exclusively by ear. If I was going to learn another instrument it would be bass.

glennerd
04-01-2019, 09:14 AM
I was finding I had progressed as far as I could with the kazoo and decided to step up to something a little more challenging.

mikelz777
04-01-2019, 09:57 AM
I tried to make music with a guitar but had pretty much abandoned it before I even picked up a ukulele. Yes, part of the reason I play a uke is because it's easier to play and I like the size much better. For me, a guitar was work to play and the ukulele is a joy to play.

frolicks
04-01-2019, 11:20 AM
After trying to play an acoustic guitar for a couple of weeks at the age of seventeen, I soon decided that six sttrings are too much for me, and I bought a bass guitar. After spendng some 20 years with an electric bass and a few years with a double bass, I found another instrument that still has the correct number of strings (for me), but doesn‘t need electricity, is much easier to carry, and much more fun to sing to. You might have guessed what I‘m talking about.

And I‘m completely with kohanmike: in about twenty years of bass playing, I bought three basses, of which I still own two. In exactly eight years of playing the uke I bought about thirty, of which I still own about fifteen to twenty.

Photodan
04-01-2019, 11:53 AM
I played piano in the 4th grade then guitar off and on over the years and mandolin for 3-4 years. I'm in my 50's and hadn't picked up an instrument in over 10 years when I bought a laminate uke about 2 years ago. I can play lots of chords and songs now, still not much of a picker, and it's lots of fun - particularly the two uke meetups I participate in around Nashville. Also bought two nicer, mid-level ukes so it's very enjoyable and I don't get so discouraged if I don't pick it up for a few days. I hope to be able to play at church eventually if they can find a spot for me.

Pueo
04-01-2019, 12:12 PM
Aloha Kimosabe!
Hope to see you around sometime!

zztush
04-01-2019, 12:48 PM
Easy is great advantage of this instrument. I recommend ukulele even he is very old. I say that ukulele is easy and you can play. I don't talk about ukulele without "easy" to my friends. I teach a friend of mine last two years. He is about 60 year old. He has no music experience before. He is enjoy learning ukulele and now ukulele is a part of his life. I still play guitar rather than ukulele but I love ukulele.

YogiTom
04-01-2019, 01:05 PM
I originally learned music and theory through formal piano lessons, taken at a young age. Then came clarinet, and finally trumpet, my original "axe", which I studied for ~12 years and went to school for (currently work in the wine biz, so you see how well that paid off :p)

I had tried to teach myself guitar years ago, but was overwhelmed by the necessary dexterity. Despite having 10+ years of piano under my belt, where both hands were using all fingers to do different things simultaneously, I could not manage more than a few simple chords and strums on the guitar, so I told myself strings just weren't for me and wrote it off as a distraction from the trumpet.

Then my wife, who claimed to be 'musically challenged', discovered she had a knack for the ukulele. I bought her a nice solid-wood travel Kala concert, and watched her musical learning take off. Her learning was put on hold, however, when she became pregnant and I picked up her uke to noodle around with. Now I'm the one obsessed with these darn things, and I don't think she has touched that Kala since.

Whether the uke is truly easier for me than guitar or piano, or just more fun to play and therefore something I want to practice more, I don't know. What I do know is that I still can't read tab to save my damn life...for someone who spent their entire musical career reading notation like a normal person, it might as well be Egyptian hieroglyphics being translated and read in ancient Olmec to me.

Getting back to "why the uke", I'm sure it is a similar answer as to why I chose the trumpet all those years ago: because it is a rightfully unapologetically fun freaking instrument to wail on! :nana:

Kimosabe
04-01-2019, 01:18 PM
Ow we’re talkin’

Bill1
04-01-2019, 01:48 PM
Its certainly easier to play for simple music, but as you get more advanced in learning about music and reaching higher playing skill levels, it actually gets harder to play because you only have access to an octave and a bit of notes. Guitars and pianos have a much wider range of notes available. So on your ukulele you need to find chords and voices in a smaller space, which is actually harder on a ukulele than it is on a guitar and piano.

mjh42
04-01-2019, 03:06 PM
Absolutely!! I've dabbled on and off with a harmonica over the years was actually thinking about getting back into them after a several decade lay off.....also had a guitar 30+- years ago but I left in the land I lived it at the time and never looked back.....never really got past a couple of cords.......and now I live in a house with people who have much more experience than I....my spouse has been playing music for 45 years.....my son for 10 plus....me just a couple....I was looking for something to do musically....the ukulele kinda of fell into place....I can share with friends and family but while family member have "their" instruments the ukulele is "mine".......I'm learning and having fun.....what else can I do the uke is for me for sure.....

Osprey
04-01-2019, 04:02 PM
After I graduated from college and before going into the Navy (I joined the Navy to get out of the draft, Yes I am that old) I bought a cheap guitar from Sears and took a class at a local Community College. I learned a few things but the guitar was hard to play, After entering the Navy and then starting a family it sat in it’s case and I eventually sold it. As I was approaching retirement I stumbled across an video of ukulele players, one of them was Jake’s Central Park video. So I went one Friday to a local music store and enquirer about Ukuleles. They said come back on Sat morning they would have a free beginners class. Just grab one off the rack and join in. Well I did and walked out of the store on Sat with my own Ukulele which was probably twice as expensive as my guitar but worth 4 times as much in playablity. I have been hooked on uke ever since, picked up Baritone a couple of years ago and really enjoy it as well. I play ukulele because I can make something resembling music, I enjoy playing with my friends. I might mess around with a friends guitar but compared to ukuleles a decent guitar costs way more.

gochugogi
04-01-2019, 04:04 PM
Once you get to an advanced level, the differences in the ease of learning disappear. Playing a Bach solo violin partita or cello suite on an ukulele is just as challenging as it is on the guitar.

Kimosabe
04-01-2019, 04:13 PM
I can well imagine!

70sSanO
04-01-2019, 05:10 PM
Played piano when I was young. Able read music once upon a time. Played guitar and some bass for a lot more years. If Iím just playing chords it really isnít that much different for me between guitar and ukulele. That all changes when playing fingerstyle melodies, especially with stretches between frets. I realize a guitar has more range so some stretches can be elsewhere eliminated, but that is also where the ukulele is easier.

John

jelow1966
04-01-2019, 06:07 PM
Its certainly easier to play for simple music, but as you get more advanced in learning about music and reaching higher playing skill levels, it actually gets harder to play because you only have access to an octave and a bit of notes. Guitars and pianos have a much wider range of notes available. So on your ukulele you need to find chords and voices in a smaller space, which is actually harder on a ukulele than it is on a guitar and piano.

This!:agree:

When you get into jazz this can become a real issue. Rootless chords quickly become your friend. The limited range means you have to think more about solos as well or else it will become very repetitive.

John

Arcy
04-01-2019, 06:22 PM
I'm learning ukulele along with guitar not instead of. The big draws for the ukulele are the portability and the community. There are several great and friendly ukulele groups near me. Groups I can play guitar with are harder to find.

gochugogi
04-01-2019, 06:25 PM
For jazz guitar you tend to play lots of 4 note rootless chords (plenty of extensions tho') to stay out of the way of the bass player. Of course if you're by yourself or in a duo you have the option of full voicings and even walking the bass.

Kimosabe
04-01-2019, 06:39 PM
I’m very happy to play jazz rhythm rather than lead on a uke. It’s often common to have just two changes per bar and these can be nice rootless jazz chords. Let the bass player fill in the root. Glen Rose’s Jazzy Uke really improved my ukulele playing. I awoke to the world of tasty, flavorful jazz chords. I’ll leave the show off soloing to others. I love how jazz chords on the uke have improved my ability to write songs. Find the melody on the higher strings and harmonize below. That’s why the baritone works so well with my voice rather than a tenor or concert or soprano.
Another thing that I like is that jazz chord fingerings are often very easy on the uke as opposed to the guitar. Once again see Glen Rose for an intro to easy jazz chords. Funny though that a lot of jazz guitarists will do a lot of their work on just four of their six strings.

Jarmo_S
04-01-2019, 07:17 PM
Ukulele has much more friendly keys than guitar. Those that you can play without too many barre chords.

Of course chord voicings/inversions are some ways more limited than in guitar, but close voicings are so easy.

What makes sense in strumming to me is 4 fingers and 4 strings. No need for muting or not playing some bottom strings etc. And fun to play with right hand fingers/styles instead with a pick.

UkingViking
04-01-2019, 07:50 PM
Its certainly easier to play for simple music, but as you get more advanced in learning about music and reaching higher playing skill levels, it actually gets harder to play because you only have access to an octave and a bit of notes. Guitars and pianos have a much wider range of notes available. So on your ukulele you need to find chords and voices in a smaller space, which is actually harder on a ukulele than it is on a guitar and piano.

This can definately be a challenge.
I often find that I can't sing and play instrumental melody bits in between in the same key, as my vocal range doesnt match the ukes range.
But with ukulele also comes lower expectations from the audience. Most people dont expect advanced stuff on an ukulele. It is easier to learn 80% of the ukuleles possibilities than 80% of the guitars possibilities, because of the limitations. So it is easier to "master", if master means being able to play most stuff people would expect.

You can always keep some extra instruments for when the limitations of ukulele become too annoying.

raffrox
04-01-2019, 07:53 PM
I definitely started because I thought the uke was easier to play and get into.

5 years later and I think my skills have developed enough that I could go play guitar relatively ok pretty quickly but I'm fine trying to perfect (or at least get less average) at playing the ukulele. It's a lot easier to siton the couch with the family and play the uke as well.

My son is studying contemporary music and there's several very good guitars laying around at times but I'm happy with my ukes.

drbekken
04-01-2019, 07:57 PM
I’m very happy to play jazz rhythm rather than lead on a uke. It’s often common to have just two changes per bar and these can be nice rootless jazz chords. Let the bass player fill in the root. Glen Rose’s Jazzy Uke really improved my ukulele playing. I awoke to the world of tasty, flavorful jazz chords. I’ll leave the show off soloing to others. I love how jazz chords on the uke have improved my ability to write songs. Find the melody on the higher strings and harmonize below. That’s why the baritone works so well with my voice rather than a tenor or concert or soprano.
Another thing that I like is that jazz chord fingerings are often very easy on the uke as opposed to the guitar. Once again see Glen Rose for an intro to easy jazz chords. Funny though that a lot of jazz guitarists will do a lot of their work on just four of their six strings.
I totally agree with this. On a baritone uke in regular dgbe tuning I can play 'jazz guitar' rhythm in any key, due to barre chords and movable chord shapes. With six strings, this becomes a lot more difficult (for me). And if you want to hear soloing with that tuning, check out the late great Tiny Grimes, playing a dgbe tuned tenor guitar.
On a six string instrument - guitar or guitalele - I find it easier to play certain blues stylings, or 'American Primitive' stuff.
(When it comes to the piano; well, I have an MA in music...main instrument is piano...can't really put it in the equation..)

Kimosabe
04-01-2019, 09:28 PM
Much obliged Dr. B. for turning me on to Tiny Grimes. There’s a lot on YouTube. I’ll dig in.

Keith Richards plays a five string guitar. Ike Turner taught him to do so and it was a revelation to Keith and changed his playing.

My favorite guitarist though is the guitarist in Nat King Cole’s trio. Just beautiful.

DownUpDave
04-01-2019, 11:55 PM
To answer the question.....yes I found ukulele much easier to learn then guitar, never touched a piano. I did attempt to learn guitar a number of years ago but other hobby/obsessions got in the way. About 5 years ago took a beginners uke class and started attending regular uke jams.

At one point I attended three regular uke jams and really enjoy the social aspect of this. Guitar was a very lonely solo/basement endeavour. I was able to get up to speed fairly quickly on uke and now perform solo and with three different groups at open mics. This has brought me full circle back to guitar about one year ago. Yes it is harder but with all the uke playing under my belt I am making good progress.

Great thread, I've enjoyed reading it, thanks for starting this Kimosabe.

mikhou
04-02-2019, 12:21 AM
I started with wind instruments and played for 10 years in junior high, high school, and college. Then I started playing guitar and while I've been playing guitar for 20 years, it was all just strum and sing without a lot of theory or knowledge. About 2 years ago, I picked up a uke after some friends had done so and found that much of the limited guitar knowledge that I had transferred over to uke very easily. Additionally, it's just so much fun to play, it's so convenient in that it's always right there, it's easy to travel with, and getting into it is a pretty small investment. I play it daily and I think that a lot of that is just because it's so small and convenient. Now when I pull out my guitar it feels HUGE. Now I would say that my knowledge of the uke fretboard and of music theory on the uke is much greater than on the guitar. That being said I do miss my guitar and wish that I was a better guitar player. Also, the guitar does a much better job of leading worship than a uke does (not that it can't be done). However, while I miss the guitar sometimes, I smile more playing the uke. :)

While I would love to be a great acoustic guitar player, I'll settle for being a fairly decent ukulele player.

Jerryc41
04-02-2019, 01:40 AM
I play it because it's a world apart from a guitar. It's small and cute and it's a uke!

"Get twenty guitar players in a room, and you have a fight. Get twenty uke players in a room, and your have a party." :D

Ziret
04-02-2019, 05:13 AM
For me, ukulele is to guitar as pickleball is to tennis. Guess what's my favorite racket sport?

RafterGirl
04-02-2019, 05:21 AM
Other than percussion in high school band, and a guitar at age 13 for about a month, I've never played a musical instrument. I love music & wanted something to take camping. The music therapists at the children's hospital where I am a nurse suggested the ukulele. I took to it like a hog to mud. I play with three local ukulele groups & in my church worship band every Sunday. I play at home every day. It picks me up when I'm dragging, mellows me out when I'm stressed, and makes me smile every day.

DownUpDave
04-02-2019, 05:36 AM
Other than percussion in high school band, and a guitar at age 13 for about a month, I've never played a musical instrument. I love music & wanted something to take camping. The music therapists at the children's hospital where I am a nurse suggested the ukulele. I took to it like a hog to mud. I play with three local ukulele groups & in my church worship band every Sunday. I play at home every day. It picks me up when I'm dragging, mellows me out when I'm stressed, and makes me smile every day.

Well said RafterGirl. Music is good for the soul

tonyturley
04-02-2019, 05:56 AM
I just turned 60 and have been playing guitar steadily since I asked my wife for a decent beginner guitar for my 40th, although I did dabble with some junk store cheapies all the way back to my teens (never really learned much). Last summer I finished a long-running archtop guitar rebuilding project, and decided I wanted to build a smaller instrument from the bottom up. I figured a tenor uke kit was a good way to start. A thrift shop baritone followed. Now I have a tenor and a baritone under construction in my basement workshop. I guess I'm hooked.

jimavery
04-02-2019, 10:02 AM
In a word: Yes.

dwh
04-02-2019, 01:12 PM
OP, I think the premise of your question is false. I don't believe playing ukulele is easier than guitar. Yes there are less strings and the scale length is less, however, playing an ukulele well takes just as much work as guitar.

rainbow21
04-02-2019, 01:38 PM
OP, I think the premise of your question is false. I don't believe playing ukulele is easier than guitar. Yes there are less strings and the scale length is less, however, playing an ukulele well takes just as much work as guitar.

For some (like me), ukulele is "easier". I stopped guitar decades ago because barring an F chord was tough and my fingers always hurt with the steel strings. When I picked up the uke less than a year ago, I found barring easier, getting started to transition to intermediate easier, and my fingers did not hurt (they might get sore, but I could stay on it for an hour right from the start).

OTOH, I agree that it must be just as much work to get really good at the instrument.

zztush
04-02-2019, 05:58 PM
For some (like me), ukulele is "easier".

Yes. We can easily compare it with guitar or piano. Ukuele is easier to

buy
start
improve
collect
give up
sell
read notation
iTunes
write tab
hung
hold without strap
carry
chord
grip
local library
abandon
bring
learn
smart phone
toilet
baby sit
sing
compose
move
physics
transit
post
amazon
child care
smell
watch
transcript
repair
melody
carry
shop
strap
discard
iPod
water
photo
ice skate
cat
exam
any size of hand
any kind of music
arthritis
break
open mic
Hawaiian
stretch fingers
anywhere in the house
anywhere in the town
modify
chunk
wipe
clean
boil
record
movie
children
young
adult
old
transposition
sandwich
capo
kitchen
set up
fat
skinny
shrink
f**k
cheat
rhythm
flat top
car
rip
string
pony tail
bald
double dip
pick nick
single
divorced
tune
rich
poor
family reunion
baseball player
tension
scale
tuner
beatles
painter
fisher man
coffee
shoelace
show and tell
assignment
barre
paint
resell
distract
peep
dance
walk
import and export
lick


I use all of these words for conversion.

Only hard to cure UAS.

Steedy
04-02-2019, 07:33 PM
I play ukulele, guitar, and piano, cause I like all three. Onliest problem is finding time to practice on all three! :D

sopher
04-03-2019, 12:06 AM
I played guitar for several decades. In general guitarists are competitive asshats. I have been playing uke for just a few years. In general, ukers are the nicest people on Earth. That's why I play uke.

sopher

sopher
04-03-2019, 12:06 AM
I played guitar for several decades. In general guitarists are competitive asshats. I have been playing uke for just a few years. In general, ukers are the nicest people on Earth. That's why I play uke.

sopher

sunshiNee
04-03-2019, 01:01 AM
Yes and No. I started Uke first not because I failed guitar. However I have the itch to learn guitar after watching a lot of solo youtube vids. There is a lot of talented people out there and I'm not one of them however they do inspire me. I bought a guitar for 95 bux from Kijiji to get myself going and I'm working on Mark Hanson's travis picking book. I find guitar way harder as I can play uke without looking at any of my hands, and well guitar not so much... more strings, and strings are closer so I'm a bit clumsy especially for finger picking.!:)

Jarmo_S
04-03-2019, 01:11 AM
I played guitar for several decades. In general guitarists are competitive asshats. I have been playing uke for just a few years. In general, ukers are the nicest people on Earth. That's why I play uke.

sopher

That is my experience too, after following a few guitar based forums, not participating in them. One can only wonder why that is so?

I sort of suspect a lots of young male gender with other problems also associated to that age. I am not saying that older guitarist in forums can't be competitive too, but maybe the tone of the forum gets its flavor from a few participants active in many threads and all this still new social media influenced behavior.

Cliff E
04-03-2019, 03:32 AM
After 4 decades of bagpipes, as well as violin and cello, my uke journey began as a means to offset those less forgiving instruments. The ease and the immediacy of the enjoyment factor once you begin just isn't there with my other instruments. For example, back in the 70s, when I was learning the pipes, the rule was that you had to spend 2 years on the practice chanter before you even could consider getting a set of pipes. Hence, the lack of perseverance of many would be pipers.

AQUATOPAZ
04-03-2019, 05:44 AM
Anyone here play the uke because itís easier than guitar or piano?

No, of course thatís not the reason I play uke. Just thought Iíd ask this April 1 question to get you all up in arms and excited and ready to leave your comments.

Yes, fiddled with my kids guitars, which I bought them as presents and they don't play, and the pain to the fingers alone, never mind the stretches, had me put them down within minutes. With a uke, I can practice for hours.

gochugogi
04-03-2019, 07:50 AM
Yes, fiddled with my kids guitars, which I bought them as presents and they don't play, and the pain to the fingers alone, never mind the stretches, had me put them down within minutes. With a uke, I can practice for hours.

Try a nice short scale classical guitar with normal or light tension nylon strings, i.e., a DH6 or RC Baritone 6. It's should be less than 50% of the tension of a steel-string guitar. In fact, a normally strung classical guitar requires less fingertip pressure than a typical tenor ukulele. As a classical guitarist, playing ukulele has really toughened up my fingertips!

DownUpDave
04-03-2019, 12:37 PM
Try a nice short scale classical guitar with normal or light tension nylon strings, i.e., a DH6 or RC Baritone 6. It's should be less than 50% of the tension of a steel-string guitar. In fact, a normally strung classical guitar requires less fingertip pressure than a typical tenor ukulele. As a classical guitarist, playing ukulele has really toughened up my fingertips!

This is so true and those that dont play guitar don't realize it. A tenor uke with florocarbon strings has more under finger tension.. Even my 00 12fret Eastman steel string with light gauge strings (12-53) seems easier to fret then my tenor ukes. At least the first four strings do.

zztush
04-03-2019, 03:59 PM
Try a nice short scale classical guitar with normal or light tension nylon strings, i.e., a DH6 or RC Baritone 6. It's should be less than 50% of the tension of a steel-string guitar. In fact, a normally strung classical guitar requires less fingertip pressure than a typical tenor ukulele. As a classical guitarist, playing ukulele has really toughened up my fingertips!

I am afraid that I could not see any evidence about your statement on stringtensionpro.com. I tried normal tension nylon string on short scale classical guitar (figure right). Tenor (figure left) is weaker tension than short scale classical guitar.

https://i.ibb.co/tq7zXF3/Zombo-Droid-04042019103244.jpg (https://ibb.co/0CgKtvQ)

gochugogi
04-03-2019, 05:44 PM
Okay, I admit I over dramatized the difference in tension but there is a real difference I can feel. I'm afraid you don't see the evidence because you filled out the tables incorrectly. I know because I actually play scales from 430mm to 664 and everything in-between and can feel it on my fingers. Don't need no friggen silly tables to know. But I did fill out that StringTension calculator since you seem to trust the internet more than actual hands-on experience. I happen to own a Romero Creations Baritone 6 classical guitar with a 20"/510mm scale (lovely little screamer) and, in standard EADGBE tuning it's really easy on the fingers and makes my tenor ukuleles feel like they're strung with metal cables! Here I used the normal tension Dynacore set modeled on the 20" scale:

http://www.fraryguitar.com/20_510mm_dynacore_normal.png

Next, here is the normal tension Dynacore tenor ukulele (17" scale) entered:

http://www.fraryguitar.com/17"_dynacore_normal.png

Yes, there is a slight difference in string diameters but thats the stock Dynacore sets D'Addario sells for both instruments and I actually use. And, yes, 13.95LB on the first string of a tenor ukulele does bite into the fingers more than 10.11LB. I don't own the RC DH6 but, at 21", the resulting tension will only be slightly higher than the Baritone 6 classical.

zztush
04-03-2019, 06:27 PM
Hey! gochougogi. You know how to lower the tension on classical guitar, right? You can apply it on ukulele. Why do you only lower the tention of classical guitar? Show me the lower tension of tenor too. Otherwise you can not blame tenor ukulele that it hurt your finger tip.

gochugogi
04-03-2019, 06:50 PM
I did nothing to "lower" the tension of the Romero Creations Baritone 6, i.e., my small classical guitar. It is normally tuned to EADGBE with normal tension strings and that's the resulting tension with a 20" scale. If you input a 25.5" scale you'd get about 16LB on the first string but that's not the point since the discussion is about small classical guitars having less tension. Yes, my Ramirez A-1 is stiff and tight but it's the longest stock scale you can buy (664mm). But you are welcome to tune your tenor ukulele to guitar pitch DGBE and get lower tension results if that floats your boat. But most people play these two instruments in the standard tuning so I stand by my assessment.

zztush
04-03-2019, 09:16 PM
I did nothing to "lower" the tension of the Romero Creations Baritone 6, i.e., my small classical guitar.

Smaller instruments (smaller scale length) are lesser tension than bigger instruments, if they carry same strings and in same tuning. Classical guitars are normally bigger than ukulele.

You did not lower the tension of your instruments. You shorten the length of clasical guitar instead. That's how you lower the tension. Then you compare it with tenor ukulele insted of soprano. You blame that tenor hurts this classical guitarist's finger tips. If it hurts this classical guitarists finger tips, I want to compare tenor ukulele with classical guitar, whom you normally play.

gochugogi
04-03-2019, 10:17 PM
Speak to the wind and dance as please but we're not writing about the same dad burn thing. I realize you have missed the point of the discussion and have another axe to grind. I simply recommended to another poster try a small classical guitar like a Romero Creations Baritone 6 if he desires to play a lower tension guitar. And, indeed, the context of the discussion was the small classical, not your fantasy. And, yes, I own and play the Romero Creations 510mm scale classical guitar and it is gentle on the fingertips, besting my ukuleles. And contrary to your belief, I did not shorten the scale. The Romero Creations Baritone 6 is sold and ships as 510mm/20" scale. Look it up if you don't believe me.

And so what if my guitar is smaller than yours? There no need for you to defend the honor of the tenor ukulele as if I insulted family members or your beloved pet dog. I love playing ukulele and it is blameless in the sight of God. Nevertheless, my ukuleles still have higher tension strings than my Romero Creations 510mm scale classical guitar. Sorry, you'll have live with it that fact.

Incidentally, I did not write that the "tenor ukulele hurts classical's fingertips." You wrote that. I wrote that, "as a classical guitarist, playing ukulele has really toughened up my fingertips!" No blame here for pain or hurt feelings. Now go down a couple cold ones and put lighter strings on tenor ukulele if it hurts your digits.

I can only assume you've never seen a small scale classical guitar—and this one is amazing—so live and learn:

https://www.romerocreations.com/baritone-6string

zztush
04-04-2019, 01:00 AM
Hi, gochugochi!


I can only assume you've never seen a small scale classical guitaróand this one is amazingóso live and learn:

https://www.romerocreations.com/baritone-6string

I have some small guitars. This one (See the photo below) is small steel string guitar next to my dreadnought. They are both tuned in EADGBE and I really enjoy them to play. Apparently small instruments is low tension if they carry same steel string sets in same tuning.

https://i.ibb.co/m51bvHL/1.jpg (https://imgbb.com/)

I do not say it to classical guitarists that as a acoustric guitarist, playing classical guitar has really toughened up my fingertips"

Because this comparison is nonsense to classical guitarists. And I know it sounds often very rude to them.

jelow1966
04-04-2019, 04:23 AM
I played guitar for several decades. In general guitarists are competitive asshats. I have been playing uke for just a few years. In general, ukers are the nicest people on Earth. That's why I play uke.

sopher

Guitar culture seems to reinforce the competitiveness, you see lists of the BEST guitarist whereas uke culture puts out lists of FAVORITE players. I don't think I've ever seen an argument about who is the best and favorite is such a subjective thing arguing would be pointless. Besides, lets face it, no matter how good someone is being a 'uke god' will never bring the acclaim of a 'guitar god' so there is little reason to be competitive and just have fun instead.

John

kissing
04-04-2019, 05:17 AM
Initially yes, it was less daunting to play ukulele than guitar..... but now that I do play guitar as well as I play ukulele, it's not a case of easy or hard anymore, but moreso the different sounds and playing styles each have.

Rllink
04-04-2019, 05:26 AM
Now that we've drifted a little to comparing ukuleles to guitars, I started playing the guitar, but I only played it a couple of months before discovering the ukulele. I think that the physical aspects of playing chords is easier on the ukulele. After all, you only have four strings to worry about. When it comes to plucking notes, physically it is the same, there are just more of them on the guitar, but pressing a string down behind a fret and plucking it, that's pretty universal. But when it comes to actually playing music, with the ukulele you have to do everything that you do on the guitar with four strings and in the case of re-entrant tuned ukulele, you have to do it with a limited range or notes. That is hard. You can't just go up and down the scale, you actually have to be creative. There are lots of little tricks that you need to know if you want to get to that point where you can hold your own with guitars, but it can be done. That aspect is what draws me to the ukulele.

glennerd
04-04-2019, 06:35 AM
I had a classical guitar in high school, which was a nice student size and the nylon strings were easy on the fingers. It eventually got moved to the storage room of my building where it got stolen after years of collecting dust. I replaced it maybe 10 years later with a big dreadnought steel string guitar and never liked the size of the body or the strings (although they sounded nice). Looking for a smaller classical guitar must be what made me stumble across the ukulele (I'm still not sure how I got here). I'd get a smaller classical guitar again though if the mood strikes - got a baritone to tie me over until then.

rrieth
04-04-2019, 07:53 AM
I have played guitar since 1964, mostly self taught, with a hiatus of about 10 years in the 1990's. I never advanced as far as the amount of time might indicate. I started on ukulele just over 5 years ago. My father was in a nursing home with dementia which had progressed to the point where conversation was difficult, but he still enjoyed singing. I chose ukulele because of its portability and relatively low volume to try not to disturb the other residents. I had many enjoyable hours with him before he finally succumbed to his dementia.

Ukulele suits my goal of accompanying my singing, throwing in a few riffs to make things interesting. I retired a year ago and have been able to practice a lot and attend 2 ukulele clubs regularly.

I have made more progress on ukulele in this short time than the entire time I have played guitar. Jazz chords are more doable than guitar, opening up a new range of songs to me. Nylon strings and the compact fretboard and neck is easier for me and tenor is my preferred size. I still have electric and acoustic guitars but rarely play them.

DownUpDave
04-04-2019, 11:16 AM
I have played guitar since 1964, mostly self taught, with a hiatus of about 10 years in the 1990's. I never advanced as far as the amount of time might indicate. I started on ukulele just over 5 years ago. My father was in a nursing home with dementia which had progressed to the point where conversation was difficult, but he still enjoyed singing. I chose ukulele because of its portability and relatively low volume to try not to disturb the other residents. I had many enjoyable hours with him before he finally succumbed to his dementia.

Ukulele suits my goal of accompanying my singing, throwing in a few riffs to make things interesting. I retired a year ago and have been able to practice a lot and attend 2 ukulele clubs regularly.

I have made more progress on ukulele in this short time than the entire time I have played guitar. Jazz chords are more doable than guitar, opening up a new range of songs to me. Nylon strings and the compact fretboard and neck is easier for me and tenor is my preferred size. I still have electric and acoustic guitars but rarely play them.

I enjoyed reading your journey, my dad was in a nursing home with dementia as well. He passed away before I picked up the ukulele. But it made me smile to think of the two of you together, him singing and you strumming.

plunker
04-04-2019, 11:39 AM
Yes, I don't think I would have picked up a guitar.

kkimura
04-04-2019, 04:30 PM
Yes, a uke is easier for me to play than a guitar and carrying around a piano is out of the question.

AustinHing
04-04-2019, 05:45 PM
116744
Not with this piano!

Graham Greenbag
04-04-2019, 07:24 PM
Anyone here play the uke because it’s easier than guitar or piano.

In a word ‘yes’ though, in fact, that’s more my perception than something I know to be virtually a ‘cast iron’ fact.

The Uke - Soprano at the time - attracted me due to its easy transportability, simplicity, low costs and ‘folk music’ connections. Electric keyboards attracted me too, the smaller ones aren’t particularly difficult to transport or dreadfully expensive but they’re not played as a group activity (eg. small group music making) and using two hands independently to make music seemed to be too complicated - though I sort of do that now with finger picking and some strum patterns are complex. The guitar just seemed to be too big (for easy storage and transport), potentially expensive and too complex (with six strings) to get started on, again that’s maybe more perception than reality. Pianos are expensive - as are formal piano lessons too - and exceedingly difficult to move, so none of the advantages of casually playing an electric keyboard but plenty of negatives.

I don’t know whether my choice of the Uke over Piano and Guitar is as logical as I’d believed at the time, however the Uke has served me well and has proved to be all that I hoped it would be. What’s more I know that what I can currently do with the Uke makes me happy and that the Uke is capable of delivering more to me again as I improve my playing skills. Perhaps I might have been better off playing a piano or guitar instead, but the Uke has been a good choice for me and one that I’m happy to suggest, recommend even, to others.

zztush
04-05-2019, 02:47 PM
Hi, Rllink!

Now that we've drifted a little to comparing ukuleles to guitars, I started playing the guitar, but I only played it a couple of months before discovering the ukulele.

I play guitar since I was in high school. About three years ago, I read a thread about play style in acoustic guitar forum. A pro said that he has no instrumental job in sitting style (see the photo below). He only gets job singing in standing posture. Many pros and amatures agree with that. They can only get instrumenta jobs in wedding celemoney or BGM. I thought even Jimi Hendrix was singing in standing posture. I changed my style. I have moved from instrumental to singing. And I take ukulele, because it is easy, easy to play in standing posture. It brings me more fun in open mic and party.

https://i.ibb.co/JKjN8Y7/PSX-20190406-092644.jpg (https://ibb.co/ZVz3vQ8)