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View Full Version : who can tell me what the only indigenous string instrument is?



mm stan
05-02-2019, 08:13 PM
In hawaii that is... It's the ukeke, not ukulele
https://vimeo.com/256840807

ukantor
05-02-2019, 09:20 PM
Did someone suggest that the ukulele is indigenous to Hawaii? The name is Hawaiian, but it is well known that its antecedents were introduced by Portuguese immigrants in the late 1800s.

It is interesting that most musical instruments were developed from strictly utilitarian objects. Our fascination with modulating sound seems to be hard wired into us.

I find myself listening to the sounds made by kitchen implements and wondering about their musical possibilities. The first man (and it would have been a man) who discovered the musical possibilities of the saw, certainly didn't have his mind on cutting timber that day!

John Colter.

Kenn2018
05-02-2019, 11:23 PM
I was going to suggest a washtub bass.

Ukantor started me wondering if a man invented that? :rolleyes:

ukantor
05-03-2019, 02:15 AM
It had to be a man - he wouldn't use a wash tub for its intended purpose!

John Colter.

Jerryc41
05-03-2019, 02:17 AM
Interesting, but I'm not about to start a collection. :)

plunker
05-03-2019, 04:40 AM
Thank you. Interesting. I will not look for a forum for them.

Ukecaster
05-03-2019, 05:14 AM
Maybe he carried this with a string? :D

117627

mountain goat
05-03-2019, 05:38 AM
i like this my Bruddah
indigenous enough for me wah

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E8H-67ILaqc

ukantor
05-03-2019, 05:47 AM
There seems to be an assumption that simple string instruments such as the ukeke were developed from the hunting bow. It seems certain that they are related, but it is just as likely that someone attached a cord to a stick for the purpose of making an interesting sound and then discovered (or someone else did) that it is possible to use the flexing of the stick to launch another stick from the cord.

Chicken and egg?

John Colter.

John boy
05-03-2019, 05:50 AM
That was a really interesting video. Thanks for sharing it. I had never heard of ukeke before. Great to see young students interesting in both music and history.

mountain goat
05-03-2019, 05:55 AM
There seems to be an assumption that simple string instruments such as the ukeke were developed from the hunting bow. It seems certain that they are related, but it is just as likely that someone attached a cord to a stick for the purpose of making an interesting sound and then discovered (or someone else did) that it is possible to use the flexing of the stick to launch another stick from the cord.

Chicken and egg?

John Colter.

I like eggs and I keep chickens
and I love this

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DkWMC2zS1fU

TobyDog
05-03-2019, 09:10 AM
Wow - he's great. Just imagine what he could do with 4 strings!!!


i like this my Bruddah
indigenous enough for me wah

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E8H-67ILaqc

Kenn2018
05-03-2019, 09:27 AM
I like eggs and I keep chickens
and I love this

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DkWMC2zS1fU

Great video. Thanks for posting it. I was curious if there were any Native American-originated stringed instruments. Now I know.

mm stan
05-03-2019, 09:35 AM
Wow - he's great. Just imagine what he could do with 4 strings!!!

Sounds Jamaican jam jon

70sSanO
05-03-2019, 04:51 PM
If a definition stretch is allowed, the Pineapple Ukulele is an indigenous Hawaiian instrument.

John

mm stan
05-04-2019, 12:20 PM
117683 wash tub bass

Nickie
05-04-2019, 04:08 PM
Thanks Stan, I had no idea.
More Hawaiian cultural history, please!