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Jerryc41
05-03-2019, 01:38 AM
I like the look of slotted headstocks, and given the choice, I would choose a uke with slots over a solid headstock. Counting products from the Magic Fluke, I have eight slotted headstock ukes.

I recently watched a documentary about Robert Johnson (see separate post), and all the great players they interviewed had guitars with slotted headstocks. I don't think the slots add to the sound, but they sure look nice.

plunker
05-03-2019, 02:00 AM
I think itis the classical guitars that have the slotted head stock because of the way the tuners are set up. Acoustic guitars have solid head stocks as well as electrics.
Correct me if I'm wrong.

Jerryc41
05-03-2019, 02:03 AM
I think itis the classical guitars that have the slotted head stock because of the way the tuners are set up. Acoustic guitars have solid head stocks as well as electrics.
Correct me if I'm wrong.

Sounds about right.

http://www.guitarbench.com/2011/03/23/slotted-vs-solid-headstock/

plunker
05-03-2019, 03:33 AM
That being said, I really like the look of a slotted head stock. Might start hoarding my pennies to get a nice pono with slotted head stock. Let's see, at my rate of saving I should be able to afford it when I am 374 years old. I am really glad that playing ability is not a consideration for owning a nice uke.

bunnyf
05-03-2019, 03:58 AM
Not long ago, I picked up a used Pono big bari steel string PC model in the slotted head version. I would have been perfectly happy with the flat headstock (had that on my smaller Pono bari PC). I actually think I prefer the cleaner, simpler look of the standard headstock. The slotted style looks busy to me. I also find string change easier. I understand about break angle and such, but I don't know that I’d choose slotted if I were buying new. Since I bought used and Pono steel string model was hard to find, the slotted head wasn’t a deal breaker.

John boy
05-03-2019, 04:31 AM
I'll join the list of slotted headstock fans. I think it's a really cool look. I have read someplace that it also lessens the weight of the headstock, though it doesn't seem like it could make that much of a difference on a uke. On a Fender bass, the headstocks feel like they weigh about 25 pounds, but not sure about ukes. I just think they look great.

ukulelekarcsi
05-03-2019, 04:31 AM
With slotted headstocks, you can have a string break angle (have the string pushing down on the nut) without having to cantilever the entire headstock too much. It's easier to make, and can also be a bit lighter than a paddle headstock. On the downside, it's requires a bit more effort to change strings.

captain-janeway
05-03-2019, 04:41 AM
Love them too. Love the look of my Kala cedar top, but agree the strings are a little harder to change. You have to work for beauty though, but I like Dolly's quote better: "It takes a lot of money to look this cheap." Love her.

glennerd
05-03-2019, 05:02 AM
Never been a fan of them on a uke but then I'm a soprano guy and the proportions are all wrong for soprano. On guitars they look fine.

bunnyf
05-03-2019, 05:03 AM
I don’t know if there is any weight savings. I know that there are good sized chunks of the headstock missing but the headstock is much thicker on my slotted Pono as compared to my reg Pono.

besley
05-03-2019, 06:03 AM
Not a fan of the slotted headstock design as it seems to add too much work to string changing. Also wonder about their being more fragile too. I've seen dozens of ukes fall over at jams, and the only one to get damaged was a K brand with a huge slotted headstock that snapped clean off.

Down Up Dick
05-03-2019, 06:10 AM
I like a lot of bling on my stringed instruments. Looks are important to me, and I think slotted heads are sharp looking. My eighter has one as does my tenor guitar.

If I was gonna buy any more ukes, I would like a slotted one. :old:

Joyful Uke
05-03-2019, 08:07 AM
And then there is the Kinnard Z-stock headstock.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kDjeu9cfztY

Does anyone else use this type of headstock, or is that exclusive to Kinnard?

D'tar
05-03-2019, 08:08 AM
Not a fan of the slotted headstock design as it seems to add too much work to string changing. Also wonder about their being more fragile too. I've seen dozens of ukes fall over at jams, and the only one to get damaged was a K brand with a huge slotted headstock that snapped clean off.

OOOh! I just bought one with a cracked neck:)

But I love them also!!!

117634

stevejfc
05-03-2019, 08:34 AM
There are + and - for both slotted and flat/paddle. However a plus for flat tops is wider opportunity for intricate inlays and designs . I noticed that Pegasus ukulele has been placing their famous flying horse inlay inside the sound hole on the neck block due to lack of space on their slotted head set models.

ScooterD35
05-03-2019, 08:52 AM
I think itis the classical guitars that have the slotted head stock because of the way the tuners are set up. Acoustic guitars have solid head stocks as well as electrics.
Correct me if I'm wrong.

You’re definitely wrong! I own 2 Martin steel string acoustics with slotted headstocks, and they currently have around a dozen slothead models in their lineup.


117635

This is me with my Martin D-15S.



Scooter

Rllink
05-03-2019, 09:12 AM
I'll join the list of slotted headstock fans. I think it's a really cool look. I have read someplace that it also lessens the weight of the headstock, though it doesn't seem like it could make that much of a difference on a uke. On a Fender bass, the headstocks feel like they weigh about 25 pounds, but not sure about ukes. I just think they look great.I don't think that slotted headstocks are lighter. But there is a discussion of that starting with our own DownUpDave in post 12 of the thread below. Enjoy the discussion.

https://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/showthread.php?122830-Slotted-headstock-or-not/page2

stevejfc
05-03-2019, 10:59 AM
The latitude for detailing on paddles is a plus, but the common tendency to abuse it, lapsing into gaudy, makes it a minus.

Agreed that it can be abused...….though I don't think it's "common". Anyway, one persons art maybe another persons !******!.

Rodzilla
05-03-2019, 11:12 AM
You’re definitely wrong! I own 2 Martin steel string acoustics with slotted headstocks, and they currently have around a dozen slothead models in their lineup.


117635

This is me with my Martin D-15S.



Scooter

You are correct, in addition to classical guitars, most 12 fret steel string guitars have slotted heads.... at least the expensive ones. Count me in the slotted head fan club.

Swamp Yankee
05-03-2019, 11:48 AM
I like slotted headstocks. Two of my three remaining steel string acoustic guitars are 12 fretters with slotted headstocks. Only one of my ukuleles has a slotted headstock... but most have friction tuners so the knobs are already pointing the right way so... ;)

Strumaround
05-03-2019, 06:30 PM
I keep seeing references to slotted headstocks being harder to string. I'm genuinely bemused as to why this might be.

Both types of headstock simply require sticking the string in a hole and turning the tuner handle until the string is in tune (at least, that's what I do). What am I missing?

YogiTom
05-03-2019, 07:58 PM
Purely on looks, I love the slotted headstock on tenor and baritone, paddle on concert and smaller.

That said, I think the Magic Fluke style would look good on smaller ukes, and I’d take the Kinnard Z headstock on any size!

As for most inlay space, best design I’ve seen has to be the paddle with through holes to stealth tuners on the back from Dave Sigman (the first headstock in his Gallery section, the “Sig-Nature Peg Head”: http://www.littleriverukuleles.com/)

Swamp Yankee
05-04-2019, 01:21 AM
I keep seeing references to slotted headstocks being harder to string. I'm genuinely bemused as to why this might be.

Both types of headstock simply require sticking the string in a hole and turning the tuner handle until the string is in tune (at least, that's what I do). What am I missing?

Not that big a deal, especially on a 4 stringed uke, but it can be a bit trickier on guitars depending on the width and angle of the slot cut.

On one guitar I owned, the slots were narrow and angled in such a manner that the first and sixth strings had to be wound with the string wraps between the hole in the shafts and the center of the headstock.

But on the second, third, fourth and fifth strings, the wraps went from the hole towards the outer edges of the headstock. If I didn't do this, and/or if I didn't wind enough turns on them, then some of the strings would bind against the edges of the slots... marring the finish and potentially causing buzzing. And, winding those outer strings at such a sharp angle that way was very difficult unless I remembered to do both outer strings first as the windings pulled those strings under the inner strings above the nut.

So, on some, you have to be strategic in your string changes... leaving enough excess to wind, winding this way or that..

Other than that, trimming the tag end of the string close to the shaft can be also tricky as access is more limited... in most cases, you can only get cutters on the string when it's at 6 o'clock or 12 o'clock.

Canuckulele
05-04-2019, 01:44 AM
I keep seeing references to slotted headstocks being harder to string. I'm genuinely bemused as to why this might be.

Both types of headstock simply require sticking the string in a hole and turning the tuner handle until the string is in tune (at least, that's what I do). What am I missing?

That’s odd. I find my slothead is easier to string. With the horizontal shaft the string doesn’t slip out at all when I begin, unlike the normal tuners. I have a Koaloha, Kaniléa K1, and a Kaniléa slothead Tenor. I pick up the slothead 8 out of ten times...love it.

Kenn2018
05-05-2019, 07:35 PM
I think the slotheads are a little more fiddly to string. But the difference is pretty small.

I'm not very picky about the headstock whether it is slotted or paddle design. I do have to say the Kinnard "Z" headstock is pretty fragile-looking to me. I'm sure it isn't.

I have 3 tenors with slotted headstocks. The rest are paddles.

Jerryc41
05-06-2019, 12:49 AM
That being said, I really like the look of a slotted head stock. Might start hoarding my pennies to get a nice pono with slotted head stock. Let's see, at my rate of saving I should be able to afford it when I am 374 years old. I am really glad that playing ability is not a consideration for owning a nice uke.

You know what's a really nice uke - the Kala cedar tenor with slotted headstock. I had one and sold it to a friend. I missed it so much that I bought another. I also had a similar Pono, and when it came time to sell one or the other, I preferred to keep the Kala.

https://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/KAATPCTG--kala-solid-cedar-top-acacia-series-tenor-4-string?mrkgcl=28&mrkgadid=3333171101&rkg_id=0&product_id=KAATPCTG&campaigntype=shopping&campaign=aaShopping%20-%20Not%20In%20Stock&adgroup=Guitars&placement=google&adpos=1o1&creative=337993469464&device=c&matchtype=&network=g&gclid=Cj0KCQjwtr_mBRDeARIsALfBZA6J-tvks9LhzgeMDAPmlYsXo3n6VBIo3p7njag6bHiJsCB_d2YVeyM aAtVtEALw_wcB

bratsche
05-06-2019, 06:22 AM
I keep seeing references to slotted headstocks being harder to string. I'm genuinely bemused as to why this might be.

Both types of headstock simply require sticking the string in a hole and turning the tuner handle until the string is in tune (at least, that's what I do). What am I missing?

Well, I have gotten in the habit of putting the string through the hole and tightly wrapping it once over, and at least once under (depending on the amount of slack) using just my right hand fingers. Only when I can't wrap it any further do I begin turning the peg to tighten the string. So in that respect, it is quicker. I don't have any slot heads, but don't think you could do this with them.

bratsche

John boy
05-06-2019, 06:54 AM
You know what's a really nice uke - the Kala cedar tenor with slotted headstock. I had one and sold it to a friend. I missed it so much that I bought another. I also had a similar Pono, and when it came time to sell one or the other, I preferred to keep the Kala.

https://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/KAATPCTG--kala-solid-cedar-top-acacia-series-tenor-4-string?mrkgcl=28&mrkgadid=3333171101&rkg_id=0&product_id=KAATPCTG&campaigntype=shopping&campaign=aaShopping%20-%20Not%20In%20Stock&adgroup=Guitars&placement=google&adpos=1o1&creative=337993469464&device=c&matchtype=&network=g&gclid=Cj0KCQjwtr_mBRDeARIsALfBZA6J-tvks9LhzgeMDAPmlYsXo3n6VBIo3p7njag6bHiJsCB_d2YVeyM aAtVtEALw_wcB

Agreed -- it's my favorite uke too, of the three I own. And I'm with Strumaround -- I don't find the slotted headstock any more difficult than a non-slotted one.