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Jerryc41
05-14-2019, 01:28 AM
I find it puzzling that some ukulele makers seem to run out of products to sell. Take Romero, for example. A friend was looking for an XS Soprano, but couldn't find one. Romero lists several different models, but there was only one available online - a solid koa for $700.

Romero makes a dozen different models, and each one is "available" in different kinds of wood, so that's a minimum of three dozen ukuleles offered by the company. I have no idea how many dealers are selling ukuleles around the world, but you would have to be the size of General Motors to keep everyone supplied with everything.

Fortunately, my friend found a beautiful solid koa XS Soprano with Gotoh tuners for $450, sold at a uke event.

It's frustrating to want a particular uke, but no one has it available. That's happened to me quite a few times.

maki66
05-14-2019, 02:04 AM
I saw a pretty good selection of Romeros at Uspace in Downtown LA when we went there last.

kerneltime
05-14-2019, 02:05 AM
That’s like saying I want a Michelin star restaurant at every corner or without reservations at all times.. without a totally predictable way to manufacture at scale while preserving the sound.. the manufacture of quality instruments will be bottlenecked.. it happens with Pono, Pepe, 3 Ks.. not all their models are always in stock, specially when they dabble in wood variations.. the only well made instruments that are always around are the standard ones without much variation.. Martin series, magic fluke instruments

Jerryc41
05-14-2019, 02:21 AM
I saw a pretty good selection of Romeros at Uspace in Downtown LA when we went there last.

It's too bad they don't sell/advertise online. I looked at their site. They open at noon, which is 3:00 PM here. My friend found a uke, so I won't be phoning them. There are probably several XS Sopranos available, but if we can't find them online...

keenonuke
05-14-2019, 02:29 AM
I find it puzzling that some ukulele makers seem to run out of products to sell. Take Romero, for example. A friend was looking for an XS Soprano, but couldn't find one. Romero lists several different models, but there was only one available online - a solid koa for $700.

Romero makes a dozen different models, and each one is "available" in different kinds of wood, so that's a minimum of three dozen ukuleles offered by the company. I have no idea how many dealers are selling ukuleles around the world, but you would have to be the size of General Motors to keep everyone supplied with everything.

Fortunately, my friend found a beautiful solid koa XS Soprano with Gotoh tuners for $450, sold at a uke event.

It's frustrating to want a particular uke, but no one has it available. That's happened to me quite a few times.

It's not just Romero. I wanted an Ohana that came out the end of April and almost immediately ran out. Elderly mentioned they received one that immediately sold :-(

Jerryc41
05-14-2019, 02:39 AM
It's not just Romero. I wanted an Ohana that came out the end of April and almost immediately ran out. Elderly mentioned they received one that immediately sold :-(

Right. With so many models, it's hard for many companies to keep the supply lines filled.

Rllink
05-14-2019, 04:24 AM
It's not just Romero. I wanted an Ohana that came out the end of April and almost immediately ran out. Elderly mentioned they received one that immediately sold :-(Had the same experience with Ohana and with Elderly. I was not stuck on that one so Elderly made me a great deal on a different Ohana that they had in stock. So it was a win for me, but I guess if you have to have a particular ukulele it would be frustrating.

My wife markets wine for a Napa winery and they do limited runs of some of their boutique wines. She is always dealing with people who buy a bottle and then want more after the run has sold out. She tells her customers that the limited runs go fast but they think that she is just trying to sell them more wine. People get real upset when they can't get what they want. Anyway, I was wondering if some ukulele manufacturers do limited runs of particular ukuleles. The Ohana that I ended up with from Elderly is a "Limited Edition" and it was one of the first limited edition ukuleles that they made. I wonder what that really means. They are still readily available, so they must have made a lot of them, or their limited edition means something else.

YogiTom
05-14-2019, 04:35 AM
To complicate the supply and demand situation, we all (or most of us, anyway) have different esthetics and ideas about how we want the ukuleles to look, too.

I have been pining over a KoAloha LN Soprano for months now, but none that I’ve found for sale online have a wood selection that really speaks to me. The ones that I have seen and liked have either already sold or are from questionable online vendors. My solution was to just buy a different damn soprano and forget about hunting for “the one”.

So, supply may well be available, but if you can’t find one you like it may as well be sold out, too. Just my 2¢

Edit: Rllink’s anecdote reminded me how fortunate we are that there is no Robert Parker or Antonio Galloni out there reviewing ukuleles and driving up the cost as a result. It made collecting wine infuriating for me in the end, because invariably some small hidden gem producer would get a 100 point review on a wine and ruin it for those of us who had enjoyed the wine at modest prices. It quickly becomes insane. I used to drink GB Burlotto all the time. Then his top wine in 2013, Monvigliero Barolo, was awarded 100 points (previously had been consistently in the low 90s) and the average prices of all his wines immediately tripled, at least. A $20 Barbera soon become $65, the Dolcetto went from $18 to $50, and the Barolos (he makes four total) all vanished from the normal market, being snapped up immediately on release and sold at auction for insane prices.

glennerd
05-14-2019, 05:04 AM
The Ohana that I ended up with from Elderly is a "Limited Edition" and it was one of the first limited edition ukuleles that they made. I wonder what that really means. They are still readily available, so they must have made a lot of them, or their limited edition means something else.

Limited edition for a bigger maker like Ohana may just mean they're only going to make it this year and not include it in their regular line up. It's a pretty loose term. For some, it may mean they're making only 100 copies (or far less) and then stopping.




I have been pining over a KoAloha LN Soprano for months now, but none that I’ve found for sale online have a wood selection that really speaks to me.


Well there's your problem, KoAlohas don't come in pine. :biglaugh:

Ziret
05-14-2019, 05:16 AM
Wasn't Pops making a pine ukulele for a while? For all I know, he may still be making it.

YogiTom
05-14-2019, 05:17 AM
Well there's your problem, KoAlohas don't come in pine. :biglaugh:

:rotfl: it explains so much! Oh the wasted hours of looking! Surely they make them in solid oak, though, right?

YogiTom
05-14-2019, 05:22 AM
Limited edition for a bigger maker like Ohana may just mean they're only going to make it this year and not include it in their regular line up. It's a pretty loose term. For some, it may mean they're making only 100 copies (or far less) and then stopping.

The Kanile‘a Platinum models fall under this definition for limited. As do the Kamaka and Kiwaya (non-season) anniversary models.

For real “limited” runs, I think of companies like The Rebel who put out a handful of higher end, semi-custom instruments and then move on to something new. And of course, hard to be more limited than a custom one-of-a-kind build from an independent luthier.

I feel like I may be diverting this thread slightly, so apologies to OP.

AQUATOPAZ
05-14-2019, 05:29 AM
I saw a pretty good selection of Romeros at Uspace in Downtown LA when we went there last.

USpace always has a decent collection of Romeros. It's a tiny store with an amazing collection of ukes.

AQUATOPAZ
05-14-2019, 05:43 AM
It's too bad they don't sell/advertise online. I looked at their site. They open at noon, which is 3:00 PM here. My friend found a uke, so I won't be phoning them. There are probably several XS Sopranos available, but if we can't find them online...

They are a small store with limited hours, basically a labor of love. Shipping would create a whole new responsibility which I'm sure they don't want. Tip- if you ever do decide to call them make sure your phone number displays. They won't answer calls without a displayed number.

Jerryc41
05-14-2019, 05:48 AM
To complicate the supply and demand situation, we all (or most of us, anyway) have different esthetics and ideas about how we want the ukuleles to look, too.

I have been pining over a KoAloha LN Soprano for months now, but none that I’ve found for sale online have a wood selection that really speaks to me. The ones that I have seen and liked have either already sold or are from questionable online vendors. My solution was to just buy a different damn soprano and forget about hunting for “the one”.

So, supply may well be available, but if you can’t find one you like it may as well be sold out, too. Just my 2¢

Edit: Rllink’s anecdote reminded me how fortunate we are that there is no Robert Parker or Antonio Galloni out there reviewing ukuleles and driving up the cost as a result. It made collecting wine infuriating for me in the end, because invariably some small hidden gem producer would get a 100 point review on a wine and ruin it for those of us who had enjoyed the wine at modest prices. It quickly becomes insane. I used to drink GB Burlotto all the time. Then his top wine in 2013, Monvigliero Barolo, was awarded 100 points (previously had been consistently in the low 90s) and the average prices of all his wines immediately tripled, at least. A $20 Barbera soon become $65, the Dolcetto went from $18 to $50, and the Barolos (he makes four total) all vanished from the normal market, being snapped up immediately on release and sold at auction for insane prices.

I'm particular about make and model, but I've never been fussy about the appearance of one particular example of a model over another example. On the other hand, if Mim has two similar ukes available, I'll pick the one one that I think looks best.

Interesting about the wine. Fortunately, I haven't experienced a big jump in ukulele prices because of a review. When I saw the Bonanza Oreo in Baz's review, I wanted one. I was hoping the review was good, and the price was reasonable. It got a good review, and the price was - and still is - reasonable. In the case of the wine, I bet it's the local stores, rather than the winery, raising the price.

Jerryc41
05-14-2019, 05:50 AM
Well there's your problem, KoAlohas don't come in pine. :biglaugh:

Oh, and I was holding out for a spalted pine. :D

Jerryc41
05-14-2019, 05:55 AM
Wasn't Pops making a pine ukulele for a while? For all I know, he may still be making it.

How about pine-apple? That would be the Pineapple Sunday.

Whoops! Yes, Pops did make a uke out of "solid pinewood" at one time (2015). Live and learn. Nothing about the appearance says "KoAloha," though.
https://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/showthread.php?106353-Launch-of-Papa-KoAloha-s-newest-Project-quot-UKE-S-A-quot-!!!

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YogiTom
05-14-2019, 07:11 AM
Interesting about the wine. Fortunately, I haven't experienced a big jump in ukulele prices because of a review. When I saw the Bonanza Oreo in Baz's review, I wanted one. I was hoping the review was good, and the price was reasonable. It got a good review, and the price was - and still is - reasonable. In the case of the wine, I bet it's the local stores, rather than the winery, raising the price.

You’re absolutely right that it is the middle men that up the price in the wine world. Poor Fabio didn’t see any real increase in what his importers were paying him for the wine, likely because the sudden demand for his wines was wholly unexpected. Domaines like DRC, however, that have had the historical demand and high quality (and high scores) garner much more from their distributors because they have the caché to do so.

I am grateful that we do have people out there like Baz reviewing ukuleles in a manner that tries to apply that same rating scale to each instrument, regardless of the MSRP. I think the difference is, you don’t see Kimo Hussey or Jake Shimabukuro out there assigning random numerical scores to ukuleles that they like to play. Could you imagine what that might do to the market for ukuleles that are given scores of 95-100 by “icons” of the ukulele world? Or ukuleles that score below 80 points (a step above garbage in the eyes of those wine reviewers I mentioned previously)? Sure, people who wanted to get their own info and form an opinion on their own will still do so, but anyone looking for the first time may be compelled to chase the scores of the “experts”.

That’s a world I’m happy to not live in, and I’m sincerely hopeful it never changes.

rainbow21
05-14-2019, 08:16 AM
Went on the Kamaka factory tour Friday. They produce about 300 per month and make them to order, meaning every one is spoken for. Next order goes to the end of the line, including if you order directly from them. So if a store or person ordered five "Jakes", they would be ready in a month or two and be produced consecutively, and numbered so.

Interestingly, cruise Waikiki and you can find a number of Uke shops, many being small spaces in hotels. They all pretty much are well stocked with all of the 3 Ks. The ones you covet may be in an obscure shop somewhere that you cannot access online.

Jerryc41
05-14-2019, 08:22 AM
Went on the Kamaka factory tour Friday. They produce about 300 per month and make them to order, meaning every one is spoken for.

So dealers must order what they want to sell.

glennerd
05-14-2019, 08:49 AM
Haha, they did make a pine model??? Well, my foot is firmly in mouth! :p

Hope they don't ask for my Opio back now. :uhoh:

Rllink
05-14-2019, 09:52 AM
I really appreciate Baz, and other people who get ukuleles, play them, and give us their opinions. As far as celebrity endorsements, they get paid to play or endorse a particular ukulele. I don't put much store in their choice of anything.

Rllink
05-14-2019, 10:12 AM
So dealers must order what they want to sell.
Back to supply and demand. My local music store does not carry hardly any ukuleles, and most of the ones they have are the cheaper Amahis. Their bigger store in Des Moines has a larger selection, but not enough more that it makes me want to drive the hour down there just to look around at what they have. So I was discussing it with the store manager last year and he told me that there wasn't a big market for ukuleles. I told him that my logic told me that if he had more of a selection he would sell more of them and then there would be a better market for them. But evidently my logic isn't sound, because they still don't have any more ukuleles than they did then. But when I was talking to him he said that they did not create the market, that they served the market. I thought that was interesting. There is a lot about retail sales that doesn't make any sense to me.

AQUATOPAZ
05-14-2019, 11:18 AM
Back to supply and demand. My local music store does not carry hardly any ukuleles, and most of the ones they have are the cheaper Amahis. Their bigger store in Des Moines has a larger selection, but not enough more that it makes me want to drive the hour down there just to look around at what they have. So I was discussing it with the store manager last year and he told me that there wasn't a big market for ukuleles. I told him that my logic told me that if he had more of a selection he would sell more of them and then there would be a better market for them. But evidently my logic isn't sound, because they still don't have any more ukuleles than they did then. But when I was talking to him he said that they did not create the market, that they served the market. I thought that was interesting. There is a lot about retail sales that doesn't make any sense to me.

I guess what he means is that there aren't many people coming in and asking for ukuleles. It would be a risk and a time investment to try to get people interested in ukuleles. For the reward involved, he would prefer to put his money on items he already knows that people want to buy because they ask for them if he doesn't have them.

Rllink
05-14-2019, 12:38 PM
Yes, I understand that, but from my point of be view, I'm buying ukuleles on line that he could be selling to me if he had something that was interesting. But I realize that he is playing it safe.

DownUpDave
05-14-2019, 12:55 PM
First World Problem!!!!! Can't get what I want when I want it at the price I am willing to pay. Boy life is so tough :wallbash:

AQUATOPAZ
05-14-2019, 12:58 PM
Yes, I understand that, but from my point of be view, I'm buying ukuleles on line that he could be selling to me if he had something that was interesting. But I realize that he is playing it safe.

You are buying online from a vendor who has a much wider swath of potential customers than your store has. Let's say your vendor purchased 3 interesting ukuleles of which you decided to purchase 1 (which given individual tastes would easily be none). Let's also say that he doubles the price he paid for them. He could easily be behind the cost of a uke if he doesn't sell another. Stores also have budgets and can only afford to have merchandise stay unsold for a limited time. Any longer, and their "open to buy budget is lowered because their capital is tied up in the unsold ukes. Add to this the loss of potential income from not having the free funds to purchase something else that would sell sooner, (opportunity cost), and his losses mount. Stores that don't make wise purchase decisions for their location eventually close. The profit from the uke you might purchase if it interests you enough is not worth the risk when you look at it from an economics model. The cost does not equal or exceed the benefit, (cost benefit model). If vendors were willing to give him consignment models, it might be worth the store's time.

Rllink
05-14-2019, 01:16 PM
You are buying online from a vendor who has a much wider swath of potential customers than your store has. Let's say your vendor purchased 3 interesting ukuleles of which you decided to purchase 1 (which given individual tastes would easily be none). Let's also say that he doubles the price he paid for them. He could easily be behind the cost of a uke if he doesn't sell another. Stores also have budgets and can only afford to have merchandise stay unsold for a limited time. Any longer, and their "open to buy budget is lowered because their capital is tied up in the unsold ukes. Add to this the loss of potential income from not having the free funds to purchase something else that would sell sooner, (opportunity cost), and his losses mount. Stores that don't make wise purchase decisions for their location eventually close. The profit from the uke you might purchase if it interests you enough is not worth the risk when you look at it from an economics model. The cost does not equal or exceed the benefit, (cost benefit model). If vendors were willing to give him consignment models, it might be worth the store's time.I don't think that you have to explain it again. I understand that.

keenonuke
05-14-2019, 01:20 PM
Limited edition for a bigger maker like Ohana may just mean they're only going to make it this year and not include it in their regular line up. It's a pretty loose term. For some, it may mean they're making only 100 copies (or far less) and then stopping.



Well there's your problem, KoAlohas don't come in pine. :biglaugh:

Well on a happy note the Ohana I was hoping for will return. :-) I received an email from Telluride Music that the Ohana will return in June. Yippee.

keenonuke
05-14-2019, 01:21 PM
Had the same experience with Ohana and with Elderly. I was not stuck on that one so Elderly made me a great deal on a different Ohana that they had in stock. So it was a win for me, but I guess if you have to have a particular ukulele it would be frustrating.

My wife markets wine for a Napa winery and they do limited runs of some of their boutique wines. She is always dealing with people who buy a bottle and then want more after the run has sold out. She tells her customers that the limited runs go fast but they think that she is just trying to sell them more wine. People get real upset when they can't get what they want. Anyway, I was wondering if some ukulele manufacturers do limited runs of particular ukuleles. The Ohana that I ended up with from Elderly is a "Limited Edition" and it was one of the first limited edition ukuleles that they made. I wonder what that really means. They are still readily available, so they must have made a lot of them, or their limited edition means something else.

I think this supply and demand is part of what fuels UAS :-(

AQUATOPAZ
05-14-2019, 06:51 PM
I don't think that you have to explain it again. I understand that.

Sorry. Then I am confused why you think he should purchase more and interesting ukes without a sufficient customer base for them. Granted, the benefit would be great to customers who would probably be able to purchase them on clearance as he tries to recoup his capital.

AQUATOPAZ
05-14-2019, 06:54 PM
I think this supply and demand is part of what fuels UAS :-(

Probably. The increased allure of the unattainable is well documented. That's why companies produce Limited Editions in a wide range of products. Scarcity breeds desire.

Jerryc41
05-15-2019, 12:27 AM
... he said that they did not create the market, that they served the market.

Without an assortment of products, it seems that they are not doing much "serving." Is he aware of the huge demand for ukes costing over $1,000?

On the other hand, how many brands, and how many models would they stock? KoAloha has at least five models, and each is available in different sizes with different wood. Your dealer could fill his store with KoAlohas alone, and then hope that local people wanted to buy them. It's the same with local music stores I've seen. They don't want to take a chance on a $1,500 uke. It's easier to sell the under-$100 ukes to people who just want a cute little ukulele.

Imagine life without online buying. With a few clicks, I have bought ukuleles from Japan, New Zealand, Germany, and Hawaii. It would have been impossible for me to buy these without the Internet.

Jerryc41
05-15-2019, 12:30 AM
Probably. The increased allure of the unattainable is well documented. That's why companies produce Limited Editions in a wide range of products. Scarcity breeds desire.

I know what you mean. I'm a sucker for "Anniversary" models.

Jerryc41
05-15-2019, 12:33 AM
Sorry. Then I am confused why you think he should purchase more and interesting ukes without a sufficient customer base for them. Granted, the benefit would be great to customers who would probably be able to purchase them on clearance as he tries to recoup his capital.

"Build a better mousetrap, and the world will beat a path to your door."

If he lived in a high-population area, and if word spread that he had a great assortment of good ukes, his uke sales would increase. He's not convinced that increased sales would cover the significant cost of buying expensive ukes. Being a store owner is tough.

Jerryc41
05-15-2019, 12:42 AM
I looked up sales of ukes and sales of guitars.

Uke sales have risen significantly over the past few years, with 1,750,000 sold since 2009. Guitars sales averaged between 1.6 and 2.5 million per year. Unless you live in Hawaii, you're not going to make a lot of money with a ukulele store.

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Rllink
05-15-2019, 03:17 AM
Sorry. Then I am confused why you think he should purchase more and interesting ukes without a sufficient customer base for them. Granted, the benefit would be great to customers who would probably be able to purchase them on clearance as he tries to recoup his capital.

What is the confusion? I don't have to agree with you to understand you. You are saying that to stay in business they need to play it safe. They need to take a conservative approach. You are saying that if they want to stay in business they shouldn't take any chances. You are saying that they shouldn't invest in inventory that they are not absolutely sure they can move quickly. Don't try to grow. I'm not in the retail business, maybe you are. That "this is what I have, take it or leave it," was a pretty sound business plan back when people didn't have other avenues to purchase from.

glennerd
05-15-2019, 04:55 AM
I can understand when you live in a smaller city or town that they don't want to stock specialty items that may not sell. What I don't understand is living in a area where the metropolitan population is 2.5 million and for the most part, all the music stores stock the same handful of brands. I'm not even talking high end ukes. For example, until fairly recently there were no Ohana dealers in the Vancouver area and even the one now carries very limited stock and mostly entry level models. I have to cross the border to Bellingham to even hope to look at a Kiwaya of any kind.

BTW, I'm really hoping someone is going to prove me wrong and tell me of some awesome shop near me that I never heard of. :anyone:

Jerryc41
05-15-2019, 05:02 AM
For example, until fairly recently there were no Ohana dealers in the Vancouver area...

I would expect Canada to have more overall demand for ukes than the USA, considering their ukulele education program.

AQUATOPAZ
05-15-2019, 05:29 AM
Without an assortment of products, it seems that they are not doing much "serving." Is he aware of the huge demand for ukes costing over $1,000?

On the other hand, how many brands, and how many models would they stock? KoAloha has at least five models, and each is available in different sizes with different wood. Your dealer could fill his store with KoAlohas alone, and then hope that local people wanted to buy them. It's the same with local music stores I've seen. They don't want to take a chance on a $1,500 uke. It's easier to sell the under-$100 ukes to people who just want a cute little ukulele.

Imagine life without online buying. With a few clicks, I have bought ukuleles from Japan, New Zealand, Germany, and Hawaii. It would have been impossible for me to buy these without the Internet.

I live in 2 of the largest cities in the country. NY has Rudy's, Uke Hut in Queens, and some small music shops, (the one closest to me where I saw my first uke 30 years ago recently closed down). For the population of millions, they probably have less than 300 ukes combined. In Los Angeles, McCabes and USpace would be the biggest ones. Again, with a population in the millions, there aren't more than than a few hundred in stock between them. These are all experienced retailers that mostly do not have an online presence, probably because of the extra cost, headaches, and logistics that would involve. If the largest cities in the country have such few ukes in stores per capita, why would anyone in smaller, more rural areas expect their stores
to be able to carry more. The only reason Mim's and Uke Republic, etc. can carry the quantity and assortment they do is because they are selling to the entire country, and their per capita stock rate is actually even lower than those of the big cities.
Be grateful they have chosen to fill this niche.

AQUATOPAZ
05-15-2019, 05:41 AM
What is the confusion? I don't have to agree with you to understand you. You are saying that to stay in business they need to play it safe. They need to take a conservative approach. You are saying that if they want to stay in business they shouldn't take any chances. You are saying that they shouldn't invest in inventory that they are not absolutely sure they can move quickly. Don't try to grow. I'm not in the retail business, maybe you are. That "this is what I have, take it or leave it," was a pretty sound business plan back when people didn't have other avenues to purchase from.

That's NOT what I'm saying at all. I'm saying that if they were foolish enough to do as you wish they would not be in business for long. That is quite different from what you are understanding. Take a hint that stores in large Metropolitan areas don't carry many ukes in relation to their population. It's not called playing it safe. It's called common sense. What is the population of that store in Iowa? Unless they were planning to expand to online sales and promoting their online site, your wish would be financial suicide. It's not an issue of not taking chances and playing it safe unless suicide is considered "taking chances". Personally, I only consider something as "taking chances" or as a "calculated risk" when the end result isn't an almost certainty. Of course you might say that just buying 5 interesting ukes wouldn't bankrupt him. I guess that depends on how his cash flow is when the rent and bills come due.

AQUATOPAZ
05-15-2019, 05:45 AM
"Build a better mousetrap, and the world will beat a path to your door."

If he lived in a high-population area, and if word spread that he had a great assortment of good ukes, his uke sales would increase. He's not convinced that increased sales would cover the significant cost of buying expensive ukes. Being a store owner is tough.

If it's an hour drive to their bigger store, I am fairly certain that he doesn't live in a large Metropolitan area.

keenonuke
05-15-2019, 05:59 AM
I really appreciate Baz, and other people who get ukuleles, play them, and give us their opinions. As far as celebrity endorsements, they get paid to play or endorse a particular ukulele. I don't put much store in their choice of anything.

I sometimes wonder if the instruments sent to Baz are cherry picked for him. Also one needs to have the perspective which he does remind us - is it's his opinion. So me I prefer a smaller nut, he appears to prefer bigger. I prefer gloss, he has stated he has other preferences. I did buy ukuleles based on his reviews and one is a keeper and two not so much. It has definitely been a live and learn. This re-enforces for me that we're all different with different tastes. As the joke goes: You're unique just like everybody else. :-)

Rllink
05-15-2019, 06:19 AM
I sometimes wonder if the instruments sent to Baz are cherry picked for him. Also one needs to have the perspective which he does remind us - is it's his opinion. So me I prefer a smaller nut, he appears to prefer bigger. I prefer gloss, he has stated he has other preferences. I did buy ukuleles based on his reviews and one is a keeper and two not so much. It has definitely been a live and learn. This re-enforces for me that we're all different with different tastes. As the joke goes: You're unique just like everybody else. :-)
I agree with you, any review is just someone's opinion and they always have to be taken that way. But sight unseen, all you have to go on is other people's opinion. But I would never buy a ukulele based only on one person's opinion. But the point I was trying to make is that to me one person's opinion carries more weight than a celebrity endorsement.

Jerryc41
05-15-2019, 09:25 AM
I sometimes wonder if the instruments sent to Baz are cherry picked for him. Also one needs to have the perspective which he does remind us - is it's his opinion. So me I prefer a smaller nut, he appears to prefer bigger. I prefer gloss, he has stated he has other preferences. I did buy ukuleles based on his reviews and one is a keeper and two not so much. It has definitely been a live and learn. This re-enforces for me that we're all different with different tastes. As the joke goes: You're unique just like everybody else. :-)

That's certainly a possibility, but if he raves about a uke, and someone buys a dud, it's going to get returned and look bad for the manufacturer. Most ukes are turned out in large enough numbers that I suspect each is very similar to every other one. It's the same when Vic Schmeltz reviews instruments. I just assume that if I buy one that he tested, it will be very similar.

keenonuke
05-15-2019, 11:53 AM
That's certainly a possibility, but if he raves about a uke, and someone buys a dud, it's going to get returned and look bad for the manufacturer. Most ukes are turned out in large enough numbers that I suspect each is very similar to every other one. It's the same when Vic Schmeltz reviews instruments. I just assume that if I buy one that he tested, it will be very similar.

Ah if only I were better at returns - something I will perhaps develop more skill at :-) I think part of the issue for me is the expense of shipping. So it becomes an "oh well." Thanks for pointing this out :-)

YogiTom
05-15-2019, 03:50 PM
... But the point I was trying to make is that to me one person's opinion carries more weight than a celebrity endorsement.

I don’t think I made a very good comparison when I equated Robert Parker (a celebrity wine critic, arguably of repute) reviewing a wine to Kimo Hussey or Jake Shimabukuro (celebrity musicians) reviewing a ukulele, not necessarily endorsing one for any monetary kick-back or personal branding. There isn’t a good comparison in the ukulele world, and I guess my point was I’m quite happy keeping it that way. Hopefully that clears things up. :)

zztush
05-18-2019, 12:52 AM
https://i.ibb.co/FVCRZ33/1.png (https://imgbb.com/)