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mikhou
05-16-2019, 03:15 AM
I'm sure that the answer to this question is, "Yes." I really, really want to like it, but I just strung up my uke a couple of weeks ago to be low G (for the first time) and I just don't care for it very much. Additionally, not having access to that high G string removes some of the ring when I alternate between the high G and the E string.

Anybody else try it and decide that it wasn't for them?

ukulelekarcsi
05-16-2019, 03:20 AM
I did, but it's just me.

DownUpDave
05-16-2019, 03:28 AM
It took me a while to #1 get use to the sound #2 learn to play it properly. I tried three seperate times, I always liked the sound of it when someone else played it, but intially not myself. Now everything I own is strung low G except sopranos.

Jerryc41
05-16-2019, 03:43 AM
I have low G on two or three ukes, and I'm having second thoughts. When I play in a group, I sound like an outsider. It does produce a nice sound, though.

Raygf
05-16-2019, 03:58 AM
I did not like low G at first, but played it long enough that I like and perform a fair amount of repertoire that keeps one tenor in low G. Bought a Fusion double tenor bag to make things easy when I play a job that calls for both. I prefer the sound of low G on a baritone. It does take time to learn to play low G. I mostly use it for finger style instrumental pieces. Give it time and try it in different situations. I enjoy the sound that low G provides in a group strum.

Jerryc41
05-16-2019, 04:05 AM
I did not like low G at first, but played it long enough that I like and perform a fair amount of repertoire that keeps one tenor in low G. Bought a Fusion double tenor bag to make things easy when I play a job that calls for both. I prefer the sound of low G on a baritone. It does take time to learn to play low G. I mostly use it for finger style instrumental pieces. Give it time and try it in different situations. I enjoy the sound that low G provides in a group strum.

I think it's funny that Romero puts low G on all their Tiny ukes, even the XS Soprano.

derbyhat
05-16-2019, 04:51 AM
I tried low G for about 20 minutes before deciding that I preferred reentrant for strumming. Just a gut reaction: I like the sparkle of the high G and A strings next to each other. When I get into playing melodies, I’ll be stringing up a uke with low G to get the extra range.

kohanmike
05-16-2019, 05:11 AM
Me, I don't like it at all. My view is I played guitar for almost fifty years before the uke, if I want linear tuning I'll play guitar, to me re-entrant tuning is what makes a uke a uke. I have nine ukes, all tenor cutaway re-entrant.

This is Michael Kohan in Los Angeles, Beverly West near the Beverly Center
9 tenor cutaway ukes, 5 acoustic bass ukes, 11 solid body bass ukes, 9 mini electric bass guitars (Total: 34)

• Donate to The Ukulele Kids Club, they provide ukuleles to children in hospital music therapy programs. www.theukc.org
• Member The CC Strummers: YouTube: www.youtube.com/user/CCStrummers/video, Facebook: www.facebook.com/TheCCStrummers

CPG
05-16-2019, 05:16 AM
Very shortly after I got my first tenor I put a low g on it. I loved it at first, probably because my ear was more accustomed to guitar like sounds. In the past year, I've gravitated more towards sopranos and the more traditional ukulele sound in general. I just put a new fremount soloist on my KA-ATP-CTG, and while I guess I like having a low g uke around, I really don't play it much, and have been thinking about putting a high g back on it or even putting it in reterant dGBE. That said, lately I am mostly working on chord melody playing using various inversions up the neck. For what I'm working on right now the close together chord forms that the high g gives really work best. Also, my uke teacher/uke club leader plays a nearly hundred year old martin soprano (and plays it exceedingly well) and since they are my main influence right now high g is what my ear wants to hear at the moment. I suspect that if I dedicated some serious time to getting more familiar with the different inversions low g provides and when/where they might work best I would start to like it more again. I'll get around to that in a few years, for now I'm likely mostly stick with playing high g.

bobhost
05-16-2019, 05:17 AM
I love my low G tenor for fingerpicking songs built around the low G.
Besame Mucho (spanish) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l5j98CQg-E0) or Besame Mucho (Beatles) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EQgDcGPQ6DQ)

But when I strum it, I feel like the open G booms too much. Good thing a body can have multiple ukuleles in multiple configurations. :-D

Lacole
05-16-2019, 05:25 AM
My oldest ukulele originally had low A’s on it. It was changed to high g’s when I had friction pegs replaced with gear heads. I’ve missed the low tuning and am having it changed to low G’s after bridge/saddle work done on the ukulele. I don’t find low tuning strange, I started out with low tuning. I found high g’s strange at first. Now I want both. Some of the pieces I have need a ukulele with low tuning.

I am not going back to the low A tuning, all g’s now.

merlin666
05-16-2019, 05:39 AM
I put a low G on my first (tenor) uke within a few months and preferred it to re-entrant. Now that I have several ukes, I have them all strung and tuned differently, and I find that some songs (and chords) sound better to me with a re-entrant set-up, and others with a linear set-up. It would be a tough call now to chose, if I had to go back to only one uke though.

Ukecaster
05-16-2019, 05:44 AM
I like both, depending on the application, low G just doesn't sound right on some songs, IMO. Sometimes, when strumming chords on a low-G uke, I need to make the conscious decision to NOT play the G-string, whereas it would usually sound OK on reentrant. That said, I have tenors strung both ways, the low G sounds more guitar-like. I've been playing the happy reentrant sound more lately, and it's very different when I go back to the low-G. I mostly strum/sing, but suppose if I played more chord melody style, I'd appreciate low-G more, and would need the extra range. I must be de-ranged. :D

plunker
05-16-2019, 05:59 AM
I play low G. I do mostly chord melody or picking (kind of). I like the f lower notes that I can play. If I was just strumming, I would probably ply high g

cdkrugjr
05-16-2019, 06:01 AM
It's not right for every uke, it's not right for every player.

I currently have my Kala Spruce Bari and my Kala Spruce Tenor strung Low g.

I'm playing fingerstyle uke on the Tenor, and Renaissance guitar music on the Bari—Mudarra wrote for "essentially low-G Bari"

I have a Pono Nui for Bari tuning.

andy2353
05-16-2019, 06:06 AM
I love the sound of the low g string for certain applications. I think it sounds best for fingerpicking and a little boomy for strumming, in general (your experience will vary with different strings). That said I recently sold the uke I had in low g and now only play reentrant, the reason being that I was basically dividing my playing time in half between low and high g. I found I was just not making the kind of progress that satisfies me on either. So now I can focus on one thing, and it’s helpful to me not to have to choose every time I pick up my uke to play. That’s not to say I don’t like listening to Corey and Kalei play low g on the HMS videos.

Andy

glennerd
05-16-2019, 06:26 AM
I've tried it a few times and I always felt like I just turned my ukulele into a little guitar. I had one uke strung low g for the songs that required it, but I didn't even like it for that. I even have a high D waiting to go on my Baritone, but so far, I've been okay with low D on that. I might make my bari re-entrant if I get a guitar again.

Rllink
05-16-2019, 06:53 AM
Me, I don't like it at all. My view is I played guitar for almost fifty years before the uke, if I want linear tuning I'll play guitar, to me re-entrant tuning is what makes a uke a uke. I have nine ukes, all tenor cutaway re-entrant.

This is Michael Kohan in Los Angeles, Beverly West near the Beverly Center
9 tenor cutaway ukes, 5 acoustic bass ukes, 11 solid body bass ukes, 9 mini electric bass guitars (Total: 34)

• Donate to The Ukulele Kids Club, they provide ukuleles to children in hospital music therapy programs. www.theukc.org
• Member The CC Strummers: YouTube: www.youtube.com/user/CCStrummers/video, Facebook: www.facebook.com/TheCCStrummers

I'm with Mike, if I wanted to go linear I would play something else. I haven't given low G a fair chance though. I've just played other people's ukuleles strung low G. I have a friend who strung his low G as soon as he started playing ukulele and sometimes we trade when we are playing, but his has never appealed to me. I don't know, it might just be mental, with me at least. I think that my friend likes low G because he has years of musical background with linear tuned instruments. He feels comfortable and familiar with linear tuning. Re-entrant is just weird to him. I feel like most of the musical world is linear with few exceptions, so I feel like I'm rebelling against the linear musical world with my re-entrant uke. I feel like re-entrant is exciting, when I play my friends uke it seems just boring and blasť. But I can see that if one likes to go up and down the scale, you get yourself a few extra notes to play with if you go low G. Very linear thinking. ;)

Jarmo_S
05-16-2019, 07:08 AM
But I can see that if one likes to go up and down the scale, you get yourself a few extra notes to play with if you go low G. Very linear thinking. ;)
Heh, well put. But fingerpickers need that, or even go to guitar. I just like my standard uke as a strumming partner.

keenonuke
05-16-2019, 07:21 AM
Other than my 5 String Ukuleles, all of my ukes are reentrant. But when I hear others play low G I love it. When I play and hear it even with 5 String it sounds off to me. Plus I need songs that are geared towards the low G tuning. However I still want to acquire the acquired taste of playing a Ukulele strung with low G.

prb035
05-16-2019, 10:25 AM
I love high g & low g, they each have their own special qualities :D

M3Ukulele
05-16-2019, 11:41 AM
I tried it a few times. The last one, got on to playing it but really didn't like the sound. Too guitar like and missing the high G sound that makes ukulele so special. Not for me. Five tenors, all with high G. I gave it a month the last time. I like how it sound when Cory et al play low G but not my thing.

glennerd
05-16-2019, 12:29 PM
I tried it a few times. The last one, got on to playing it but really didn't like the sound. Too guitar like and missing the high G sound that makes ukulele so special. Not for me. Five tenors, all with high G. I gave it a month the last time. I like how it sound when Cory et al play low G but not my thing.

Exactly. I like how other people can make it sound, but it's not for me!

Joyful Uke
05-16-2019, 01:28 PM
I love high g & low g, they each have their own special qualities :D

+1. There is a place for both low g and high g.
I suspect those of us who like low g might do more fingerpicking than the people who don't like low g.
Or, the wrong low g string could be a problem. Some of those low g strings are off-putting, but with the right string, it works for me.
I keep ukuleles in both high and low g, and play both regularly.

prb035
05-16-2019, 01:44 PM
+1. There is a place for both low g and high g.
I suspect those of us who like low g might do more fingerpicking than the people who don't like low g.
Or, the wrong low g string could be a problem. Some of those low g strings are off-putting, but with the right string, it works for me.
I keep ukuleles in both high and low g, and play both regularly.

Yes, good point about the actual type of Low G string. I initially tried unwound varieties & they just didn't sounds right to my ears, so I switched to the Fremont Soloist (as recommended here at UU) and that is truly a wonderful & squeakless string to play, even with my meagre abilities! :D Thanks UU :D

tomthebaptist
05-16-2019, 01:47 PM
I'm sure that the answer to this question is, "Yes." I really, really want to like it, but I just strung up my uke a couple of weeks ago to be low G (for the first time) and I just don't care for it very much. Additionally, not having access to that high G string removes some of the ring when I alternate between the high G and the E string.

Anybody else try it and decide that it wasn't for them?

I have my Collings tenor tuned high G and a Koaloha Opio tuned low G. I get bored with low G tuning

Yom

70sSanO
05-16-2019, 01:57 PM
Iíve tried low g a few times but it has never worked out. I do strictly fingerstyle/strum melodies. For how I play, low g requires too much covering of the notes on the g string or completely muting the string at times. Leaving a low g string open too much just doesnít sound right. This also makes playing up the neck, especially with some stretches, beyond what I want (able) to do.

If I change my style, I might re-visit the tuning.

John

mnb128
05-16-2019, 03:46 PM
Yes, good point about they actual type of Low G string. I initially tried unwound varieties & they just didn't sounds right to my ears, so I switched to the Fremont Soloist (as recommended here at UU) and that is truly a wonderful & squeakless string to play, even with my meagre abilities! :D Thanks UU :D

Exactly the same for me. The first low g string I tried was a Worth Brown. It was so boomy I literally took it off after one song. Then I saw the recommendations for the Fremont Soloist here on UU and thought I’d give it a try. It was love at first fingerpick. It did take some getting used to strumming, though. It’s just sounds wrong at first. I would equate it to accidentally taking a swig of iced tea when you expect it to be Coke. Even if you like iced tea, it still tastes wrong. If you’re used to reentrant, linear will just sound wrong for a while, even if it sounds good. Some will never like it, and that’s fine.

That said, so much of it depends on the song. I’ve found that something written specifically for reentrant, like something from Jake Shimabukuro, for instance, almost never sounds right in low g to me. Something written for low g can sometimes sound fine in high g but sometimes not. Genre can make a big difference, too.

I’m not good enough yet to noodle around effectively without tabs to follow, so I don’t know what I’d like better figuring out my own chord melodies.

Anyway, I like them both on individual songs. I very seldom like them both on the same song, if that makes sense.

Ukecaster
05-16-2019, 03:51 PM
.....Anyway, I like them both on individual songs. I very seldom like them both on the same song, if that makes sense.

Perfect sense to me!

mikhou
05-16-2019, 04:56 PM
That said I recently sold the uke I had in low g and now only play reentrant, the reason being that I was basically dividing my playing time in half between low and high g. I found I was just not making the kind of progress that satisfies me on either. So now I can focus on one thing, and itís helpful to me not to have to choose every time I pick up my uke to play.
Andy

This is definitely part of my concern. I want to progress at my uke playing and not be inhibited everytime I pick it up to say, "So what style do I play to day?" Then I've got to decide which piece of music do I pick up and is it setup for low or high g.

mikhou
05-16-2019, 04:57 PM
However I still want to acquire the acquired taste of playing a Ukulele strung with low G.

This is where I am. I want to like it, but I'm not falling in love with it.

mikhou
05-16-2019, 05:04 PM
Thanks for all of the replies, and keep em coming. I think that I'm having several issues. 1) I want to progress and don't want the paralysis by analysis that I have to choose every time I pick up my uke which style I'm going to play. 2) The low G string does boom and it's not what I think of when I think "uke." 3) Some of you have way more disposable income than I do! :) I've only got my Ohana CK-10S and my Ohana TK-50G. I started with the less expensive CK-10S and later picked up the TK-50G. I've been playing for several years now, and I can't justify another uke right now. I prefer the TK-50G as it's all solid and I like the tenor scale. I recently changed the TK-50G to low G to give it a shot. But if I string one high G and one low G and I focus on learning one style then I've got one uke sitting there collecting dust.

Again, thanks for your input. I'm going to give the low G a month before doing anything to see how it goes, but I'm partial to the high G at this point.

glennerd
05-16-2019, 05:17 PM
Thanks for all of the replies, and keep em coming. I think that I'm having several issues. 1) I want to progress and don't want the paralysis by analysis that I have to choose every time I pick up my uke which style I'm going to play. 2) The low G string does boom and it's not what I think of when I think "uke." 3) Some of you have way more disposable income than I do! :) I've only got my Ohana CK-10S and my Ohana TK-50G. I started with the less expensive CK-10S and later picked up the TK-50G. I've been playing for several years now, and I can't justify another uke right now. I prefer the TK-50G as it's all solid and I like the tenor scale. I recently changed the TK-50G to low G to give it a shot. But if I string one high G and one low G and I focus on learning one style then I've got one uke sitting there collecting dust.

Again, thanks for your input. I'm going to give the low G a month before doing anything to see how it goes, but I'm partial to the high G at this point.

Well the important thing is you have more than one ukulele, so you can have both configurations. I wouldn't have given low g a second chance if I didn't have another ukulele I could keep as re-entrant. And nothing wrong with Ohanas - my SK-38 is my favourite uke. Not getting on with low g probably had something to do with my getting a baritone - that and I thought it would fill the guitar craving (almost, but not quite).

AQUATOPAZ
05-16-2019, 07:21 PM
Thanks for all of the replies, and keep em coming. I think that I'm having several issues. 1) I want to progress and don't want the paralysis by analysis that I have to choose every time I pick up my uke which style I'm going to play. 2) The low G string does boom and it's not what I think of when I think "uke." 3) Some of you have way more disposable income than I do! :) I've only got my Ohana CK-10S and my Ohana TK-50G. I started with the less expensive CK-10S and later picked up the TK-50G. I've been playing for several years now, and I can't justify another uke right now. I prefer the TK-50G as it's all solid and I like the tenor scale. I recently changed the TK-50G to low G to give it a shot. But if I string one high G and one low G and I focus on learning one style then I've got one uke sitting there collecting dust.

Again, thanks for your input. I'm going to give the low G a month before doing anything to see how it goes, but I'm partial to the high G at this point.

Ukuleles are supposed to be fun, not a chore.
1.) You don't need to analyze what you want to play. Just go with the flow and play whatever you feel like at that moment.
2) You don't need to make a decision now about Low G. You can leave that uke as Low G until you decide you don't want to. Since you say you will give it a month, take advantage of that month by googling some ukulele lessons for Low G and see if any of the material grabs you.
3.) You have one more ukulele than many people. Just enjoy them any way you choose until you feel like enjoying them differently. It's only a string change, not a huge investment. No need to stress out about making a "decision". It's ok to take it as it comes.
Nothing about High or Low G ever needs to be written in stone for you.

AQUATOPAZ
05-16-2019, 07:52 PM
This is definitely part of my concern. I want to progress at my uke playing and not be inhibited everytime I pick it up to say, "So what style do I play to day?" Then I've got to decide which piece of music do I pick up and is it setup for low or high g.

I play different styles of songs in one sitting. I just play what I feel like or what I'm still learning. I suggest you keep a bookmark folder of songs you like that you can easily get to. I also suggest you check out rockclass101.com. You can listen to previews of songs you may want to learn in both high and low g, and you can save the ones you want to learn in a favorites folder. Different songs work on different techniques, so you are always growing. I got pretty proficient at barre chords from one song that was mostly barre chords, and have been working on another with lots of hammer-ons with different fingers, including pinkies. Just don't complicate things by overthinking them. When you are playing something you really enjoy, you will progress. All you need to do is find the songs that inspire you to practice the new techniques and skills required for that song.

PetalumaRescuke
05-16-2019, 08:13 PM
With my preference for Sopranos, it is high G on all of them and Concerts as well.
I think the small bodies are not a tonally match for the Low G.
I never got into Tenors as they seem guitar like.
For the songs that are serious, protest/Dylan, or just downright sad, I play them on a Baritone with DGBE tuning. 4 strings are my ceiling, I don't fret with my thumb.

TopDog
05-16-2019, 09:49 PM
Prefer the high re-entrant G on my ukes, as that makes them ukes, in my book! Have tried Low G on various models I have owned, and as a former guitarist I found it easy to go back to linear tuning; but....still prefer my ukes to sound like ukes, and to BE ukes!

ukantor
05-16-2019, 09:58 PM
I'm a strummer who only plays sopranos, so I guess it figures that I would not favour low 'G'. I've borrowed concerts and tenors fitted with a low 'G', but they just don't sound like ukuleles.

John Colter.

UkingViking
05-16-2019, 11:15 PM
I am privileged enough to have multiple tenors, so I can have both tunings around.

I use the low G when I need the extra range for a melody or turnaround, but usually use high G for strumming.

I assume that low G will have some advantages of you want to travis pick etc, but I still havent gotten low G picking patterns into my fingers yet. So when I try to pick patterns on my low G, it sounds off because I am used to high G.

Since you put low G on the Ukulele, I suggest that you try out some playing styles that should go well with it.

ripock
05-17-2019, 01:48 AM
I suppose I don't see what all the fuss is about. I have ukuleles with both tunings and I play them the same way. When I am strumming chord progressions, both tunings sound good. I realize the chords are different voicings on the re-entrant versus the linear ukulele, but since all the chords are inverted, it sounds appropriate to me. When I improvise with scales and modes, I use all four strings on the linear and only the top three strings on the re-entrant, but I do the same stuff regardless. The only time I worry about which ukulele I play is when I'm playing something from Daniel Ward's Meditations For Ukulele books because he has written the meditations specifically for re-entrant. Otherwise, the ukulele I play is only dictated on whether I'm in the mood for the shriller re-entrant or the more mellow linear.

Andreas Fischer
05-17-2019, 02:26 AM
i dont even want to try low G
- If i want low G - i take a Guitar (have many of them) with Kapo at 5th frett and play the 4 lowest strings - but i never do that, i prefere the 6 strings
- I play Fingerstyle a lot and all my Tabs are for High G

janeray1940
05-17-2019, 04:41 PM
I hated it at first until I realized it wasn't the low G I disliked, but the non-wound boomy fluorocarbon string. Swapped it out for a wound guitar D string, then later a Fremont Soloist, and 8 years later, I still happily play both low G and reentrant equally.

That being said - some ukes just don't take to low G, so it does involve some experimentation to find the right one. FWIW, mine is a Kamaka HF-1L longneck (concert scale) with a soprano body, and I think it sounds great.

mjh42
05-17-2019, 05:19 PM
With my experience of a few years of playing an uke I feel I still don't know much. My concert is re-entrant, one tenor is re-entrant, and one tenor is low g. I really like the sound from the low g tenor with the blues, folk, rock style music I like to play. Once in a while I find a song that just doesn't sound right but I'm sure there are more left hand positions that would make song playable. I may try low g on my other tenor one of these days. I have strings just haven't make the switch yet.

70sSanO
05-17-2019, 08:22 PM
With my experience of a few years of playing an uke I feel I still don't know much. My concert is re-entrant, one tenor is re-entrant, and one tenor is low g. I really like the sound from the low g tenor with the blues, folk, rock style music I like to play. Once in a while I find a song that just doesn't sound right but I'm sure there are more left hand positions that would make song playable. I may try low g on my other tenor one of these days. I have strings just haven't make the switch yet.

For me a lot has to do with the key you play in. Blues in A (same as E on a guitar) is easy to play and always sounds good because the simple open chords cover the g string regardless if it is low g or high g. Playing in G requires covering the low g string because the simple chord forms of G-C-D leaves the G string open too much. It never bothered me on a guitar because the E and A bass strings are used, even without barre chords.

John

AustinHing
05-17-2019, 10:49 PM
I don’t make the choice, the tabs if is in low g then I have to do it in low g. Currently I’m doing low g on my concert, but I still prefer the soprano scale. Time to get a soprano just for low g.

FinnP
05-18-2019, 04:16 AM
on a tenor yes sometimes, on a soprano no

Kibes37
05-18-2019, 10:09 AM
Iíve tried low g a few times but it has never worked out. I do strictly fingerstyle/strum melodies. For how I play, low g requires too much covering of the notes on the g string or completely muting the string at times. Leaving a low g string open too much just doesnít sound right. This also makes playing up the neck, especially with some stretches, beyond what I want (able) to do.

If I change my style, I might re-visit the tuning.

John


I was unaware you need to mute or leave the Low G open quite a bit for certain styles. Donít like the sound of that too much. I have yet to try a low g, but itís coming on my Clara in a week or so. I came from guitar and am not looking for that sound, but I do like the idea of more range.

zztush
05-18-2019, 11:27 AM
I'm sure that the answer to this question is, "Yes." I really, really want to like it, but I just strung up my uke a couple of weeks ago to be low G (for the first time) and I just don't care for it very much. Additionally, not having access to that high G string removes some of the ring when I alternate between the high G and the E string.

Anybody else try it and decide that it wasn't for them?

Listen to as much great low G plays as you can and enjoy them. Listen to Ohta san and Iz.

https://i.ibb.co/Yp7q0HG/Joint-Pics-20190519-062347.png (https://ibb.co/Ch5TPRF)

Nickie
05-18-2019, 11:36 AM
I did.
I don't like it. I don't care for the way it sounds strummed at all.
I only pick one song with lo G, that's Foggy Dew.
I would not want my only uke to be strung that way.
I much prefer to play hi g, that's the way an ukulele is supposed to sound, I feel, and you can't really play Baroque in lo G.
I have a friend who just bought a 5 string uke, and he loves it. I played a 5 string once and found it kinda tricky.

Joyful Uke
05-18-2019, 11:58 AM
Huh.
I didn't realize that there was so much dislike for low g.

I've got Daniel Ho's music playing right now, (low g), and it's lovely.
Maybe it's all about what type of music you like to play and listen to?

The cool thing is that we have the choice, (and in my case, I choose to have both linear and reentrant ukuleles at hand - I'm lucky that I can have more than one ukulele, I know), and enjoy ukulele in many sizes, tunings, and styles. (And woods, and builders, and on and on. Lots of variety.)

So whatever your preference, enjoy!

mnb128
05-18-2019, 12:39 PM
I've got Daniel Ho's music playing right now, (low g), and it's lovely.

Agreed! I love me some Pineapple Mango, both the fruit and the song. It’s impossible to listen to and not smile. Seriously couldn’t imagine it with a high g. Then again, most people wouldn’t want to imagine me playing it with a low g either.

glennerd
05-18-2019, 12:45 PM
Agreed! I love me some Pineapple Mango, both the fruit and the song. Itís impossible to listen to and not smile. Seriously couldnít imagine it with a high g. Then again, most people wouldnít want to imagine me playing it with a low g either.

I'd probably enjoy listening to you play it with a low g. I just don't like listening to myself play with low g. It's just a personal thing, but I feel like I've sucked the personality out of my ukulele when I string a low g. I don't think this thread was meant to discourage people who like low g. You should always go for what makes you happy. It's more of a discussion for those of us who had misfortune with the low g experience.

Strumdaddy
05-18-2019, 02:00 PM
I've tried low G many times thinking it would give more depth to my sound - and a few more notes to add to what is the fairly limited range of the uke. But it didn't work for me. I find that the low G asserts itself too much into proceedings; I prefer the delicious ambiguity of the high G string notes as a mysterious, subtle element. Plus I like the right hand feel of arpeggiating without having to always account too much for that low note (musical laziness??)
Without that low G the low note is the C - which, in an esoteric way, seems to feel right with the heart feel of the uke. Also - strumming starts with a high note for both up and down strokes which again suits the light hearted nature of the uke.
I thought that a low G would give me a bigger sound, but the price of squeezing out a few more notes wasn't worth it to me. The uke has limitations (everything does) I have found a great deal of joy within them.

mnb128
05-18-2019, 03:30 PM
I'd probably enjoy listening to you play it with a low g. I just don't like listening to myself play with low g. It's just a personal thing, but I feel like I've sucked the personality out of my ukulele when I string a low g. I don't think this thread was meant to discourage people who like low g. You should always go for what makes you happy. It's more of a discussion for those of us who had misfortune with the low g experience.

I hear you Glenn. I have no argument with that. I had an earlier post in this thread stating that my first experience with low g was so bad that I took the thing off after one song. After trying it again, though, I learned to love it. Some never will, and that’s cool with me. Heck, my 7 year old son doesn’t like chocolate. To each their own, right? Play what puts joy in your heart, and enjoy the journey. Whether you take the low road or the high road, it’s all good.

Anyway, I would just suggest for those that have only taken the low road once and didn’t like the trip, try it at least one more time, maybe with a different string set, or maybe with a different uke. You may just find that you like the scenery better the second time around.

70sSanO
05-18-2019, 03:32 PM
No hate for low g. I really like the sound of low g and have heard some great arrangements played in low g. For me, I’m probably too lazy right now to change the way I put together arrangements.

It really is a style approach. The easiest way to explain the difficulty is using Guitar Gently Weeps as an example. The well known Jake version is unplayable with low g tuning.

John

AQUATOPAZ
05-18-2019, 03:34 PM
The uke has limitations (everything does) I have found a great deal of joy within them.

That last line is beautiful and a wonderful way of looking at life.

fretie
05-18-2019, 03:46 PM
I played only high G and only sopranos for quite a few years. Then, because I joined the Luongo workshops here in BC, I was propelled into low G (which also sent me to the tenor size ukes). I gradually became comfortable with the more booming sound of that low G bad boy.
Now, after the dust is settling, though I have become quite fond of the tenor size, I still quite often miss that whimsical high G sound. So, logically, I am looking to add a high G tenor to my herd.

glennerd
05-18-2019, 06:11 PM
Anyway, I would just suggest for those that have only taken the low road once and didn’t like the trip, try it at least one more time, maybe with a different string set, or maybe with a different uke. You may just find that you like the scenery better the second time around.

Who knows? I’ll probably try again someday. One of those flat-wound squeakless strings maybe. I didn’t like the unwound sound nearly as much as wound, but didn’t like the feel or squeak of wound strings so that style seems interesting.

Jan D
05-18-2019, 06:23 PM
Who knows? I’ll probably try again someday. One of those flat-wound squeakless strings maybe. I didn’t like the unwound sound nearly as much as wound, but didn’t like the feel or squeak of wound strings so that style seems interesting.
Glenn,
If you ever give low G another try, do go with the Fremont Soloist, a polished wound low G string that doesn't squeak. I found it to be a huge improvement over the various boomy-sounding unwound low G's that I first tried. The Fremont seems to blend much better with the remaining fluorocarbons on my uke.
Jan D.

Woody Ukepicker
05-18-2019, 06:25 PM
I have tried Low G several times and each time at the end I have let down.
I also play guitar and I do not find any interest to play a low G ukulele. It sounds to me like a guitar with 2 broken strings.
Same feeling with baritone ukulele. I only like baritone uke when tuned re-entrant.

Strumdaddy
05-18-2019, 09:26 PM
I have tried Low G several times and each time at the end I have let down.
I also play guitar and I do not find any interest to play a low G ukulele. It sounds to me like a guitar with 2 broken strings.
Same feeling with baritone ukulele. I only like baritone uke when tuned re-entrant.

I have my baritone tuned re-entrant - so I do have a low G uke!!!

Rllink
05-19-2019, 04:06 AM
I'd probably enjoy listening to you play it with a low g. I just don't like listening to myself play with low g. It's just a personal thing, but I feel like I've sucked the personality out of my ukulele when I string a low g. I don't think this thread was meant to discourage people who like low g. You should always go for what makes you happy. It's more of a discussion for those of us who had misfortune with the low g experience.My opinion too. I also think it has a lot to do with how you identify yourself as a ukulele player.

Down Up Dick
05-19-2019, 06:15 AM
Well, here I go . . . I sorta think of a ukulele as a “my dog has fleas” instrument. Fun to strum and sing at the beach under a palm tree, or in a canoe bobbing along at the lake, or by a blazing campfire. But I’ve always found the low G to be “boomy” when strummed. There’s supposed to be a way to stop boominess, but I’ve never found it. I guess the low G is okay for fingerpicking, but if one is gonna fingerpick, maybe a baritone uke or tenor guitar would be a better pick.

I have two ukes tuned in fifths, and I don’t really even like that too much, though I fingerpick them. I wonder why we buy an instrument that we like and then change everything that we can on it.

“What fools these mortals be . . .” My thanks to my ol’ pal, Seneca. :old:

Joyful Uke
05-19-2019, 06:43 AM
I guess the low G is okay for fingerpicking, but if one is gonna fingerpick, maybe a baritone uke or tenor guitar would be a better pick.

I wonder why we buy an instrument that we like and then change everything that we can on it.


Hope you don't mind me taking a couple sentences out of your post. I don't think that takes anything out of context.

I hear someone like Daniel Ho or Jake play, and don't think to myself that they should play a different instrument. Fingerpicking can work wonderfully on ukuleles.

Anything larger than a concert sized neck doesn't work for my fingers, which have had some injuries in the past. But since I can't sing, (I think the neighborhood has banned me, LOL), and I wouldn't be content to just strum chords with no singing, fingerpicking on a uke is very enjoyable for me.

A lot of ukuleles were built to be low g. Ohta Sans seem to be built for low g. (I know I'll be corrected by someone who knows more if I'm wrong.) Seems like a lot of the luthiers also build specifically to low g. So, if I buy some of those ukuleles, I'd actually be changing it if I made it reentrant. As far as fingerpicking goes, Kamaka says that the Ohta San "was designed primarily for fingerpicking purposes." So, no need to play guitar if you want to fingerpick. Kamaka agrees.

I think one of the very cool things about ukulele is how versatile it is. Lots of possible tunings, (I use both high and low g, but some of you use others, too), lots of ways to play it, lots of styles of music can work on it, and it's just a great hobby. Pretty amazing what that little 4 stringed instrument is capable of.

I really admire those of you who can strum and sing. Wish I could. But I'm also happy that I have the enjoyment of working on fingerpicking. As a friend once said to me, when he needed to change instruments due to health problems and pain issues, it's all about the music, not the instrument.

So, enjoy making music on your ukulele, no matter what size, type, tuning, or style.

Down Up Dick
05-19-2019, 07:16 AM
Well, Joyful, if I may call you that. One can play or change anything as he/she pleases. If they pay the money, they can make a birdhouse out of it.

I was just answering the question of this thread. But how do ya take a shower if ya can’t sing? Anyway, keep on pickin’. :old:

Joyful Uke
05-19-2019, 07:30 AM
But how do ya take a shower if ya can’t sing? Anyway, keep on pickin’. :old:

Quietly. :-)

Don't want the neighbors banging on my door complaining about noise pollution while I'm in the shower.

I do recognize that you're just answering the thread, and a lot of people agree that low g isn't to their liking. Like I say, it's a cool thing that the ukulele can be so versatile and we all can enjoy it in different ways.

I just pulled out a high g ukulele, and will be playing that right now, in honor of this thread. :-)

Down Up Dick
05-19-2019, 07:47 AM
Since ya got yer ol’ strummin’ uke out, go in the bath room, turn on the shower, flush the toilet and belt out a line two. No body can sing until they “Just do it!”.

Besides, who cares whether you sing well or not. Singin’, like medicine, is good for you. Pick a silly song like “Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star” and let ‘er rip.

Soon enough you’ll be dead and never have had the fun of beltin’ out a rip roarin’ song or two — go for it! :old:

Down Up Dick
05-19-2019, 07:53 AM
By the way, when I play my new (second hand - gift) cornet, I go in my wife’s big closet full of clothes and blast away.

I’m practicing to play a duet with Gabriel. :old:

AQUATOPAZ
05-21-2019, 10:58 AM
Well, here I go . . . I sorta think of a ukulele as a “my dog has fleas” instrument. Fun to strum and sing at the beach under a palm tree, or in a canoe bobbing along at the lake, or by a blazing campfire. But I’ve always found the low G to be “boomy” when strummed. There’s supposed to be a way to stop boominess, but I’ve never found it. I guess the low G is okay for fingerpicking, but if one is gonna fingerpick, maybe a baritone uke or tenor guitar would be a better pick.

I have two ukes tuned in fifths, and I don’t really even like that too much, though I fingerpick them. I wonder why we buy an instrument that we like and then change everything that we can on it.

“What fools these mortals be . . .” My thanks to my ol’ pal, Seneca. :old:

I usually finger pick or play chord melodies on my Concert and travel Sopranissimo. No need for a Tenor or Baritone for either.

AQUATOPAZ
05-21-2019, 11:02 AM
Quietly. :-)

Don't want the neighbors banging on my door complaining about noise pollution while I'm in the shower.

I do recognize that you're just answering the thread, and a lot of people agree that low g isn't to their liking. Like I say, it's a cool thing that the ukulele can be so versatile and we all can enjoy it in different ways.

I just pulled out a high g ukulele, and will be playing that right now, in honor of this thread. :-)

I love to sing, karaoke. Don't care for singing while playing a ukulele. Also can't concern myself too much about my lack of a singing voice. It was bad luck, however, when my slot for karaoke last time came up right after an amazing singer. I really didn't need that comparison moment.

Ukulelerick9255
05-21-2019, 01:28 PM
I only play in low G. In fact I tune down a half step to F# B D# G# on some songs. I find high g more of a tuning for instrumentals and low G far easier to sing with.

intro
05-21-2019, 06:24 PM
Hard to imagine giving up either one.

intro
05-21-2019, 06:26 PM
This is great if you get the right uke for it. Some ukes are almost stressed-sounding at standard pitch.

Jhud
05-22-2019, 07:37 AM
Like a few others have stated in this thread - I really want to like the low G but every time I try it I’m back with a high G before too long.
Might sound a bit simplistic but a Uke sounds more like a Uke with a high G string fitted in my opinion.

captain-janeway
05-22-2019, 08:07 AM
I'm joining with everyone else saying it depends on song and style. To me picking sounds much better with low g and strumming sounds better with high (especially since low g sounds a little off in a group). I can fingerpick songs originally done for guitar that sound great in low g, but godawful in high. Like you can't even recognize the tune bad. I have one of each uke, but since I like picking, the low g gets used most.
I think for some people it depends on uke size as well. I don't hear low on many sopranos, but I do on lots of tenors. I have a cedar top concert that still has that deep, rich tone that I like with a low g. Yes, I know some people will say "play a guitar," but my hands aren't anywhere big enough.
Just play around and see what you like. From your original post, it sounds like you just prefer high g
Have fun!

VegasGeorge
06-13-2019, 05:35 PM
If you're playing melodies, and hanging around first position chords, the low G string is really necessary unless you fudge on the melody lines a lot. Of course, if your up on the fretboard, it doesn't make so much difference. If you're strumming chords without picking the melody, then re-entrant sounds better on a lot of tunes. I've noticed that when auditioning new material. Sometimes the low G string just kills the chord.

shanmoon
06-13-2019, 05:52 PM
I first tried low G when I bought a slightly used Pono Pro Class Cedar/Macassar Tenor. I liked the sound but found the low G to be a bit overwhelming. Later I experimented with Low G on a number of different string and uke combos. I din't really warm to low g til I started using the Freemont Soloist for the Low G. I also found that some ukes just dont seem to work for low G for me no matter what strings I try.

I current have the following strung low g that I really like:
Pono Pro Classic Spruce/Rosewood Concert - Freemont Soloist w/Worth Browns
Kala KA-SRT-MA (Aratani Model) Spruce / Rosewood Tenor - Freemont Solist / Aquilas Nylgut. i think it came with all Nylguts, and I decided to try the low g based on favorable posts about it. It works well, and all the strings feel well balanced.
Pono Pro Classic Cedar/Macassar Ebony - this was my 1st low g uke, bought used, strung with Thomastik-Infeld CF-30 and CF-27 Chrome Steel flat wound strings for the Low G and C strings, and Oasis Fluorocarbon Brights for the E and A sound good; the string all sound great, but I found the G to overwhelm the other strings a bit, and am thinking of switchiing it to a Soloist for the low g, and the oasis for the remaining strings.

I've tried a few different low Gs that I disliked intensely. I bougt an Ohana 470G Spruce/Rosewood concert uke from Mim and had her set it up with all flurocarbons (Worh Clears) in low G and boy did I HATE it. The low-g felt jangly and loud and didn't mesh with the other string at all to my ear. I swapped the flurocarbon low g for a re-entrant G, and now I love that little uke (its my go to concert uke for travel). Another low-G I really hated: the Aquila Red low G that was on my Koaloha Spruce top Opio when I got it (yuck, it sounded oogy and felt weird and scratchy); I ended up switching it to all Worth Browns w/re-entrant tuning. Now I like that little uke quite a bit (although I don't like its friction tuners at all, blech).

I think the key to low g is finding the strings for the uke/tonewood in question that is balanced well with the other 3 strings, and that sings to your ear. Plus I think the song has to suit it. Some songs just sound better in low-g, some either way, and some work better re-entrant (in my humble noob opinion).

Swamp Yankee
06-14-2019, 02:41 AM
I switched one of my concerts to low G with a wound G string. I hated it at first, but I’m slowly warming to it as I found some songs with a finger picked syncopated pattern sound passable fair with a low G. I don’t like it strummed, however, as the dang wound string squeaks on my fingernails.

VegasGeorge
06-15-2019, 04:58 PM
I’ve gotten darn tired of the wound low G strings breaking. So now I’m only using the Aquila Reds. So far, none have broken, and I’ve had a couple of them on Ukes for a couple of years. And, I think they sound OK.

steve-o-reno
06-16-2019, 03:02 AM
I used only high G tuning for many years. Every now and then I'd string up a uke with low G and try it a while but it never sounded "ukey" enough. I would also try low G on different ukes and it was amazing how the sound of each instrument changed. I finally came across a tune I wanted to play that sounded best with low G (Pink Floyd's Brain Damage). So right now I've settled on one uke strung low G, and it's one that I never thought of using low G tuning on. Never say never.

shanmoon
06-19-2019, 08:54 AM
I used only high G tuning for many years. Every now and then I'd string up a uke with low G and try it a while but it never sounded "ukey" enough. I would also try low G on different ukes and it was amazing how the sound of each instrument changed. I finally came across a tune I wanted to play that sounded best with low G (Pink Floyd's Brain Damage). So right now I've settled on one uke strung low G, and it's one that I never thought of using low G tuning on. Never say never.

You don't happen to have a fingerpicking style tab for Brain Damage do you? Bet it could sound awesome!

merlin666
06-19-2019, 09:41 AM
You don't happen to have a fingerpicking style tab for Brain Damage do you? Bet it could sound awesome!

No tab needed. Just play along with the song it's a very easy pattern. Though I much prefer to play it on my 12 string guitar ...