PDA

View Full Version : "The Camera You Have with You"



Jerryc41
05-26-2019, 01:35 AM
We often hear that the best camera is the one you have with you. This was proven true recently.

I went to a semi-annual dinner with people from my high school class. At the last minute, I decided to bring my tiny Sony WX9, which easily fits into a pocket. Usually, a friend with a D810 takes lots of beautiful pictures, but I figured I'd get a few shots, too.

As it turned out, the "pro" guy had problems with his D810/flash combo, so he got only four pics, while I got over a dozen. Low tech is better than high tech when the high tech isn't working.

EDIT: Too funny! I posted this on the wrong forum! I go back and forth between a photo forum and this one. Somehow, I posted this here, rather than there. I imagine people will wonder why I posted this here. (So do I.) :)

arktrav
05-26-2019, 01:45 AM
Very true! I think that applies to a lot of the stuff we have surrounding us. However, your little camera is high tech" to someone's "kodak".

Croaky Keith
05-26-2019, 01:46 AM
Having given up photography as a hobby, I no longer carry one 'just in case' I see something.

But I will take one with me occasionally when I go somewhere a bit special, 'just in case' I want to get a shot, (usually a tiny pocket compact with a 10x zoom).

ukantor
05-26-2019, 01:57 AM
That is so true. My brother used to be a professional sound recordist working in film and TV. He tells of an occasion when it was necessary to record the vocal reactions of a glider pilot undertaking his first solo flight. The director insisted on recording onto a large reel-to-reel tape machine - he despised "unprofessional, crappy" small cassette recorders. My brother looked at the radio transmitter needed to make this work, and was not happy. He secured a cassette recorder in the cockpit with gaffer tape, without telling the director.

The radio link failed, and the once only event could not be repeated. The director was distraught, until my bro told him about the "crappy" cassette recording, which had captured the event quite adequately.

John Colter.

Jerryc41
05-26-2019, 02:03 AM
That is so true. My brother used to be a professional sound recordist working in film and TV. He tells of an occasion when it was necessary to record the vocal reactions of a glider pilot undertaking his first solo flight. The director insisted on recording onto a large reel-to-reel tape machine - he despised "unprofessional, crappy" small cassette recorders. My brother looked at the radio transmitter needed to make this work, and was not happy. He secured a cassette recorder in the cockpit with gaffer tape, without telling the director.

The radio link failed, and the once only event could not be repeated. The director was distraught, until my bro told him about the "crappy" cassette recording, which had captured the event quite adequately.

John Colter.

Yes, for "the first time," you must have a backup.

Swamp Yankee
05-26-2019, 02:19 AM
....so, youíre going to leave us all in the dark as to your choice of entree at this semi-annual event?

Jerryc41
05-26-2019, 02:33 AM
....so, you’re going to leave us all in the dark as to your choice of entree at this semi-annual event?

Salmon - delicious. It was the hors d'oeuvres that were really impressive. They kept coming in waves. Open bar, too. Since I had to drive 2 1/2 hours to get home, I limited myself to one porter.

Col50
05-26-2019, 04:15 AM
What a difference an ocean makes.

What is a Semi Annual Dinner?

Jerryc41
05-26-2019, 04:23 AM
What a difference an ocean makes.

What is a Semi Annual Dinner?

We get together every half year. Or maybe it's that we eat just half the dinner. I forget. :)

It was held on Long Island, just a few miles from the ocean. : )

Rllink
05-26-2019, 04:27 AM
What about your phone camera? I don't even know where a real camera is in my house anymore.

Jerryc41
05-26-2019, 04:43 AM
What about your phone camera? I don't even know where a real camera is in my house anymore.

I don't have much luck with that. It's probably having to hold it up in front of me that makes the pictures less than sharp. I use it so little that I'm not accustomed to how to do what. Right now, it's in video mode, and I don't know how to get back to stills. :)

I prefer my big, heavy, awkward Nikon DSLRs.

Lacole
05-26-2019, 04:54 AM
Right now I cannot charge my real camera, as the charger has gone missing. I have a camera on my cell phone, and another on my iPad. Haven’t done so, but these “cameras” can also do videos with audio.

Arcy
05-26-2019, 05:42 AM
I imagine people will wonder why I posted this here. (So do I.) :)I figured it was an analogy to ukuleles: the one you have with you sounds way better than the one left behind!

Part of today’s plan is to pack up my SLR and lenses to sell. Haven’t used it much in ages, and I don’t foresee wanting to carry the weight ever again. As your point goes: my phone that’s with me captures much better pics than the big glass sitting on a shelf!

Jerryc41
05-26-2019, 05:43 AM
Right now I cannot charge my real camera, as the charger has gone missing. I have a camera on my cell phone, and another on my iPad. Haven’t done so, but these “cameras” can also do videos with audio.

Amazon has generic batteries and chargers for good prices. I've been using them for years.

Jerryc41
05-26-2019, 05:44 AM
I figured it was an analogy to ukuleles: the one you have with you sounds way better than the one left behind!

Part of today’s plan is to pack up my SLR and lenses to sell. Haven’t used it much in ages, and I don’t foresee wanting to carry the weight ever again. As your point goes: my phone that’s with me captures much better pics than the big glass sitting on a shelf!

Look up your gear on eBay and go down the left column and click on "Sold items." That will show you what people were willing to pay.

ukantor
05-26-2019, 06:58 AM
My son likes taking photographs, has studied the subject, and finds he can get the results he wants with his smart phone. I've got several decent "proper" cameras, but they only out perform the smart phone in certain circumstances, like when you need to shoot in very low light, or with telephoto capability.

And the smart phone is always in his pocket...............

John Colter.

Jerryc41
05-26-2019, 07:24 AM
My son likes taking photographs, has studied the subject, and finds he can get the results he wants with his smart phone. I've got several decent "proper" cameras, but they only out perform the smart phone in certain circumstances, like when you need to shoot in very low light, or with telephoto capability.

And the smart phone is always in his pocket...............

John Colter.

Regardless of the camera, skill place a big part in getting good pictures. That's why I'm not a professional photographer. : )

Joyful Uke
05-26-2019, 07:45 AM
We often hear that the best camera is the one you have with you. This was proven true recently.

I went to a semi-annual dinner with people from my high school class. At the last minute, I decided to bring my tiny Sony WX9, which easily fits into a pocket. Usually, a friend with a D810 takes lots of beautiful pictures, but I figured I'd get a few shots, too.

As it turned out, the "pro" guy had problems with his D810/flash combo, so he got only four pics, while I got over a dozen. Low tech is better than high tech when the high tech isn't working.

EDIT: Too funny! I posted this on the wrong forum! I go back and forth between a photo forum and this one. Somehow, I posted this here, rather than there. I imagine people will wonder why I posted this here. (So do I.) :)

This could apply to ukuleles, too. A functioning ukulele is better than a fancy non-functioning ukulele. :-)

ukantor
05-26-2019, 07:54 AM
Here's one of my son's shots. Pretty good for a phone camera, I think.

John Colter

Chopped Liver
05-26-2019, 07:59 AM
So, I graduated from high school in the stone age. My dad ALWAYS had his camera with him for special occasions. It was his hobby. He was snapping picture after picture. Couldn't understand why he could get so many pics from one roll of film.

Um, yeah. There was no film in the camera. Luckily, I had given my cheapo point and shot camera to my brother and he had taken some shots . . .

YogiTom
05-26-2019, 08:00 AM
I was fortunate to use a Leica (canít remember the model) a couple years back on a road trip, and it is all I think about whenever the thought of buying a new camera comes up. It took beautiful photos of portraits and landscapes, was intuitive to use for a relative camera novice like me, and had a sleek and stylish vintage look despite being a powerful digital camera.

Of course, even their base models cost more than most K-brand ukes, and I thankfully donít yet have CAS (camera acquisition syndrome)...key emphasis on yet. :rolleyes:

Jerryc41
05-26-2019, 08:06 AM
Here's one of my son's shots. Pretty good for a phone camera, I think.

John Colter

Nice one. ....

Jerryc41
05-26-2019, 08:08 AM
Um, yeah. There was no film in the camera. Luckily, I had given my cheapo point and shot camera to my brother and he had taken some shots . . .

That happened at my wedding. My father-in-law couldn't understand how he was getting over forty shots out of a roll of 36. The film didn't get caught on the take-up reel. Fortunately, he wasn't the only one taking pictures.

Croaky Keith
05-26-2019, 08:11 AM
and I thankfully don’t yet have CAS (camera acquisition syndrome)...key emphasis on yet.

I had it bad at one time, just like ukes, always gotta try the next one..... ;)

(The quality of the optics is the deciding factor.)

Rllink
05-26-2019, 08:17 AM
Here's one of my son's shots. Pretty good for a phone camera, I think.

John Colter

That is a cool picture. There was a period of time, back before digital photography, where I thought I was going to do photography as a hobby. I bought a Nikon and some lenses. I took a couple of classes at the community college. But I found that no matter how good the camera, it was the eye behind it that counted most. I kept spending more and more money on cameras and lenses in the hopes that it was the equipment and not me. I gave it up after a while as a hobby. My son recently took all of the old equipment and started using it. Evidently film photography is coming back as some kind of throwback movement. Whatever, I'm glad he is getting some use from it.

By the way, I've seen some of Jerry's photographs and I would say that he has the eye for it.

Slade
05-26-2019, 04:59 PM
Playing ukulele is a hobby. Photography is what I do for a living. Iím just excited to see both subjects in the same forum.

gochugogi
05-26-2019, 05:10 PM
I always carry a wee Canon EOS SL1 with pancake lens in my messenger bag. It's always with me whether at work or play. Not the best camera I own but, yeah, I manage to take decent images with it. Not a fan of smartphones. They have stolen the souls of an entire generation. All around me are smartphone zombies mesmerized by their palm tech.

Sharpshin
05-26-2019, 05:34 PM
That is a good photo. Studying pays....like in ukulele playing.
I have a box of digital Canons and lenses...going to the thrift shop ...all boxed up sitting by the front door for weeks..I don't use them anymore but it is hard to load them in the car. Ha!


Here's one of my son's shots. Pretty good for a phone camera, I think.

John Colter

ScooterD35
05-27-2019, 02:27 PM
Strange as it may seem, the camera on my iPhone XR is better than any stand alone camera I’ve ever owned. Takes great pictures, 4K video, slow motion video, time lapse video... and it makes phone calls too!


Scooter

gochugogi
05-27-2019, 06:41 PM
Probably not that great for shooting big wave surfing, birding and football...

ukantor
05-27-2019, 08:04 PM
Most people use a camera for casual social photography and recording scenes and chance happenings. A phone camera is good enough to meet those needs. I doubt if the compact camera on its own will survive as a consumer device. There will always be a need for specialist photographic equipment, and to cater for the serious hobbyist, but for most folk, their phones are all they need.

John Colter.

UkingViking
05-27-2019, 08:07 PM
I remember buying a digital camera back in 06 or 07, when 5 MP was a good resolution and sensors were note that good.
I enjoyed having a stand alone camera, and kept using it for a while after getting a smartphone.
But after a smartphone upgrade I realized that the phone took so much better pictures.

I went and got a small micro 4/3 camera. Like a kamera that has the body size of a point and shoot, but you put interchangable lenses on it, and the sensor is a crop factor 2.
With a low aperture pancake lens on it, you can see the difference from a phone picture, especially in low ligth. But I just dont carry it as many places as my Phone. It is smaller than a full frame camera, but still too big for a pocket.

The advantages of a stand alone camera over a Phone camera are zoom and potentially bigger censor.
To get both you will need a big bulky camera.

You can get a compact point and shoot with a lot of zoom, but it will not have a big censor for low light pictures.
You can get a compact point and shoot with a decent censor size, like Sony RX 100, but it will not have a lot of zoom.

If I didnt have my micro 4/3 today, I would buy the pocket size camera with the biggest censor I would pay for, rather than getting a clumpsy one with interchangable lenses. But that is how I balance my priorities.

Jerryc41
05-27-2019, 10:40 PM
Strange as it may seem, the camera on my iPhone XR is better than any stand alone camera Iíve ever owned. Takes great pictures, 4K video, slow motion video, time lapse video... and it makes phone calls too!


Scooter

There's a joke in photography. People offer a compliment by saying, "You must have an expensive camera." :)

Cell phone cameras can take excellent pictures, but it still takes a certain amount of skill.

Kenn2018
05-28-2019, 10:25 AM
I stopped carrying an SLR years ago. I found I got too wrapped up in the photography and missed a lot of the "experience" I was shooting. Plus, I realized that the only photos I cared about were the ones with family or friends in them. I mostly take snaps with my cell phone (iPhone 8).

The landscapes and travel shots I take with the phone are not quite as nice as those I can get with my Nikon Coolpix, but they aren't far behind.
For macro closeups, optical zoom and dramatic lighting photos, the Nikon is better, but the cell phones are catching up fast. And the convenience just can't be beat.

One of these days I will plunk down some cash for a newer model with a better sensor and capabilities. But then again, I could use the money for a nice ukulele...

glennerd
05-28-2019, 11:03 AM
There's a joke in photography. People offer a compliment by saying, "You must have an expensive camera." :)

Cell phone cameras can take excellent pictures, but it still takes a certain amount of skill.

So many people run around with SLRs now that I've stopped assuming they know what they're doing. :rolleyes:

Arcy
05-28-2019, 12:30 PM
So many people run around with SLRs now that I've stopped assuming they know what they're doing. :rolleyes:I've always judged based on the tripod rather than the camera body.

And yes, I have mounted an iphone on a gitzo carbon fibre tripod with a RRS ballhead. Who hasn't? :)

prb035
05-28-2019, 12:31 PM
There's a joke in photography. People offer a compliment by saying, "You must have an expensive camera." :)

Ha-ha, people could probably say that about me! She has an expensive ukulele, she must be a good player! :D If only they knew.

Arcy
05-28-2019, 12:43 PM
Ha-ha, people could probably say that about me! She has an expensive ukulele, she must be a good player! :D If only they knew.The double joke is that people often don't know what they're looking at and mistake size or bling for expense. One of my cheapest (but blingiest) ukes gets the most impressed comments - even at a uke circle!

ScooterD35
05-28-2019, 03:22 PM
There's a joke in photography. People offer a compliment by saying, "You must have an expensive camera." :)

Cell phone cameras can take excellent pictures, but it still takes a certain amount of skill.


Well... my phone is also more expensive than any camera I’ve ever owned. For the record, I have zero photography skills and have yet to completely understand all that my phone’s camera is capable of!



Scooter

Jerryc41
05-29-2019, 12:57 AM
I remember buying a digital camera back in 06 or 07, when 5 MP was a good resolution...

I remember a photo magazine with the headline on the cover: First 1MP Camera!

ukantor
05-29-2019, 01:35 AM
"First 1MP Camera!"

I had one of those! For general use 10MP is a good level. I have a Pentax Optio A30 that I bought about ten years ago (10MP). It still performs extremely well, and gives excellent results.

John Colter.

UkingViking
05-29-2019, 08:39 AM
"First 1MP Camera!"

I had one of those! For general use 10MP is a good level. I have a Pentax Optio A30 that I bought about ten years ago (10MP). It still performs extremely well, and gives excellent results.

John Colter.

I remember my first digital camera.
It was basically a 0.3 MP webcam that could be used without the computer. But with no screen, no flash, no nothing.

Yeah, for most purposes something like 10 MP is plenty.
My camera is 12 MP, and I rarely want to use the pictures in higher resolution than I get.
I usually scale most of my pictures down to a small fraction, as 12 MP is way more than you need for screen viewing.

glennerd
05-29-2019, 09:55 AM
I remember my first digital camera.
It was basically a 0.3 MP webcam that could be used without the computer. But with no screen, no flash, no nothing.

Yeah, for most purposes something like 10 MP is plenty.
My camera is 12 MP, and I rarely want to use the pictures in higher resolution than I get.
I usually scale most of my pictures down to a small fraction, as 12 MP is way more than you need for screen viewing.

I'm recalling the first digital cameras we got at work in the 90's with a 3.5" floppy disk drive. 1MP, I think. For my personal camera I held out for 3MP to become affordable.

The nice thing about higher resolution is if you don't have enough zoom you can crop it and still have a decent picture. But if you never crop or zoom, 12MP is more than you need for screen viewing.

ricdoug
05-29-2019, 08:16 PM
At my youngest baby daughter's reaffirmation of vows about a decade ago, I bought over 500 Walmart $5 buck 35MM instant photo cameras with flash on each chair at the wedding and again at the reception and developed them all, along with the photos from a highly referred local professional photographer. I would have saved tons of cash using only those WalMart camera photos. The professional photographer offered much less than the disposable camera results and my smart phone photos.

UkingViking
05-30-2019, 12:10 AM
I'm recalling the first digital cameras we got at work in the 90's with a 3.5" floppy disk drive. 1MP, I think. For my personal camera I held out for 3MP to become affordable.

The nice thing about higher resolution is if you don't have enough zoom you can crop it and still have a decent picture. But if you never crop or zoom, 12MP is more than you need for screen viewing.

For screen viewing, you can even crop a bit on a 12 MP picture, depending on the resolution of your screen.

I remember when I used to look primarily on resolution and optical zoom ratio when shopping for a camera.
If I want to crop a photo, it is more important that it is sharp. Rather fewer pixels with better contents. Now I look mostly on sensor size and lowest aperture, so I can take better pictures in low light. I have to admit that super zoom can be fun to play with, and is good for pictures of animals etc, but I value the other factors more.