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RLM3121
05-26-2019, 05:49 AM
I have a Romero Replica tenor that I recently purchased that has what I think is a odd issue. The B note on the A string will ring in a somewhat muted sound without much sustain. However, if the uke is held a certain way between my body and arm it is much better. It has significantly more sustain. Holding it this way has no effect on any other notes.

I really like this tenor and am willing to overlook this oddity but am curious if other folks have run across this kind of thing. Any information will be appreciated. Ray

pix.fairydust
05-26-2019, 07:09 AM
I have found that on some instruments, the odd note doesn't ring as clearly and has that dull sound. Changing the string has sometimes helped, but usually I just put it down to a quirk of that particular instrument.

Sorry, can't help but I know what you're talking about!

70sSanO
05-26-2019, 05:15 PM
That is a tough note to not be right. The position change is odd. You need to find out if it is the pressure on the soundboard or back that is influencing the note. If it is the soundboard you might be able to fix it with an arm rest that frees up the soundboard to vibrate.

It would be odd if the back would have that much influence. If that is the case and it bugs you enough it “might” be possible to slightly scallop a back brace(s) to free the back up a bit, but you really should take it to someone to have it done.

John

Briangriffinukuleles
05-26-2019, 07:29 PM
Check the height of the next fret. The string might be so very close to a high fret that it's vibration, thus the sound is affected. If that is the case, its and easy fix. Level your frets.

gochugogi
05-26-2019, 09:03 PM
Most of my instruments, even really expensive ones, have a few minor wolf and/or dead tones. I can usually compensate while playing but the big deal is the degree of the unevenness of volume. When I bought a new Kremona Mari tenor it had some two nasty wolf notes: open E and F on the 1st fret of the second string were twice as loud as the surrounding notes. Oddly enough, they almost disappeared after a couple weeks of being up to pitch. Six months later are pretty much even with the surrounding notes. I suppose the soundboard needed to flex into shape and acclimate to Hawaii. On the other hand my RC Tiny Tenor 6 has one note—D-sharp on the 6th fret of the 1st string—that has about half the sustain of the notes around it. Volume and timbre are fine but it sounds clipped and, after 4 months, hasn't changed much. Normally I observe such short sustain above the 12th fret but everything above the 12th fret rings like a dad burn bell.

dkbrantley
05-26-2019, 11:56 PM
Check the height of the next fret. The string might be so very close to a high fret that it's vibration, thus the sound is affected. If that is the case, its and easy fix. Level your frets.

This is what I would think the problem is. Let us know if you get it resolved!

Jerryc41
05-27-2019, 12:05 AM
However, if the uke is held a certain way between my body and arm it is much better. It has significantly more sustain.

That's interesting. It sounds like holding it that way is causing the configuration of the uke to change slightly. Maybe there's slight movement between the neck and the body, or there's a bit more compression of the body or top of the uke. I hope someone has an answer for this. I think we need a luthier the chime in.

RLM3121
05-27-2019, 04:06 AM
I think it really has something to do with the vibration of the back. The surrounding frets some to be the same. I just think that putting pressure on the back is changing something.

70sSanO
05-27-2019, 06:14 AM
I think it really has something to do with the vibration of the back. The surrounding frets some to be the same. I just think that putting pressure on the back is changing something.

Can you figure out exactly where on the back?

I know that there is a product called Tone Gard that some people use on the back of mandolins to move the instrument away from the body. Not something I would do, but, as mentioned above, it might be possible for a luthier to slightly shave a back brace to get the back to vibrate more.

John

70sSanO
05-27-2019, 07:17 AM
Actually the first step is to play a B note on the G string. You should get the same result if it is frequency related. If it has plenty of sustain and not muted, try the same note on the E string.

John