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Kibes37
05-30-2019, 07:57 AM
I’m really starting to feel like I don’t want Ukes I have to baby. I have Kanile’a and a Clara (here any damn day);) I also desire a moon bird badly when funds are right. However, I’m finding not really caring about my Opio (still kinda babied, won’t stand for damage, but gets left out. Plus outside play) is freeing and relaxing. I’m super anal with my Kanile’a. I was gonna go barebone on the Clara, but I ended up getting most of the bells and whistles. So now it’s more expensive than my Kanile’a. Defeats some purpose. I have a beater soprano en route and I’m starting to drool over a black flea. I previously would not even entertain looking at one. Do I really need to go high end anymore? I think one Custom and a Moon Bird and My UAS will be for durability and care free play. I love the idea of good well priced deals with “sleeper” sound quality now. Seems like I’m heading towards a few real nice Ukes in cases in my closet and a bunch of character rich cost efficient models accessible and played much more. I suppose nice ones for recording will be a huge plus...

Arcy
05-30-2019, 08:07 AM
Riffing on Jerryc41's "The Camera You Have with You" thread, a ukulele you're not afraid to play will sound much better than one that gets left in its case!

Part of my "is this too expensive" equation includes if it's pricy enough that I'd be afraid to play it. I'm pretty lazy, and if I can't keep an instrument out and at hand it's not likely to get played. My better acoustic guitar spends too much time in its case in favour of the lesser instruments that get hung on the wall year round.

There's also diminishing returns in sound quality - most of my inexpensive ukuleles sound great on their own, even if there's a noticeable difference when played side-by-side with a more expensive one (and honestly speaking, the limiting quality factor is the player not the instrument).

--Rob

Rllink
05-30-2019, 08:16 AM
I'm often surprised how much abuse just a regular wooden ukulele will withstand. Not bulletproof by any means, I've broken one, but I don't baby them and they do fine. I will admit that I do have one that I baby, but the rest enjoy life to the fullest.

Kibes37
05-30-2019, 08:31 AM
I’m not a fan these days of worrying about belt buckles, headstocks catching things or rouge dog tails. I’m trying to care less about possessions in general. I have justified spending what I have already on the fact these Ukes are more than objects to fawn over. They bring immense joy, they help my concentration and memory, they make me better with my left hand in general, they make me a better listener and I’m way more constructive of a person when I have a sound goal... Becoming fluid and at home with this instrument. I’ve mentioned it before, but Kimo is right. They have their own personalities. Looks can be deceiving...

Lapyang
05-30-2019, 08:36 AM
I have a Kimo Baritone, beautiful wood (Swiss Moon Sitka and pepper quilted bubinga) and glossy finish. I babied that uke like crazy. Then 2 weeks ago, I dropped the case lid on it and the fang of the latch dented the top. I was devastated!!! But then.....I started really playing it. Chunking, strumming, tapping, really going at it. Now this Kimo is not perfect to look at but perfect to be played!

Kibes37
05-30-2019, 08:42 AM
I totally get that. Maybe a blessing in disguise. Well done moving on... I probably would have put a dent in my wall and taken some anger management classes after that ;)

70sSanO
05-30-2019, 09:32 AM
Duplicate post.

70sSanO
05-30-2019, 09:32 AM
I'm often surprised how much abuse just a regular wooden ukulele will withstand. Not bulletproof by any means, I've broken one, but I don't baby them and they do fine. I will admit that I do have one that I baby, but the rest enjoy life to the fullest.

This is so true. I can see it now... a group of Portuguese sugar cane workers in the late 1800’s sitting around talking about humidifying their machetes, what case to keep them in, and worrying about taking them to the beach. Then one asks... “What string winder do you use?”. Sorry I couldn’t resist.

John

Rllink
05-30-2019, 10:28 AM
I think that some people become emotionally attached to their ukuleles and the thought of them getting hurt is too much.

pix.fairydust
05-30-2019, 10:38 AM
All my ukes are out, only for sale ones get put away. I look after all my ukes but most are used ukes or have come with a little beauty mark already. Although I look after my instruments and don't go out of my way to damage them it's very freeing to not worry about adding to the beauty marks story (as it were).

AQUATOPAZ
05-30-2019, 11:02 AM
So true. The biggest impediment to enjoying ukes appears to be the care that must be taken with them, especially in the humidification dept.

DownUpDave
05-30-2019, 11:46 AM
A story I have related before. My brother inlaw has a Martin HD-28 guitar solid spruce and rosewood ($3500) that he bought in the 60s. He spent 10 years as a teenager back then hitchhiking around North America busking and living on the streets. He still plays that same guitar on stage today. It weathered all kinds of storms, has been repaired a few times and still sounds great.

All of my custom ukes have been out of the house and I take the Koolau traveling with me extensively. I use to have a Pono Pro Classic cedar and macassar ebony that I took camping all the time ($1200), it had some dings and scratches but was in great structural shape. Life is too short to play crappy sounding ukuleles around the camp fire, at friends houses and cottages, on the beach or on a mountain top.

RafterGirl
05-30-2019, 12:20 PM
I currently have & have had nice ukes in all price ranges. I take reasonable care of them, and I’m very bummed when one gets dinged. But I wouldn’t stop taking any of them, regardless of price, to any of my jams or performances. I recently got a Blackbird Clara for travel & camping. Some might think that’s too expensive of a uke for those purposes, but I got it because it’s sturdy, should travel well, and sounds fantastic.

Kibes37
05-30-2019, 12:30 PM
Life is too short to play crappy sounding ukuleles around the camp fire, at friends houses and cottages, on the beach or on a mountain top.[/QUOTE]

Words to live by.

DownUpDave
05-30-2019, 12:48 PM
Life is too short to play crappy sounding ukuleles around the camp fire, at friends houses and cottages, on the beach or on a mountain top.

Words to live by.[/QUOTE]

I remembered your video..........I knew the phrase "mountain top" would resonant (pun intended) with you ;)

I take very very good care of my ukes but I bought them to play them. If a ding or scratch happens it does hurt but then it is magically transformed into a player and that is what it was made to be.

AustinHing
05-30-2019, 02:27 PM
Ain’t yours till you put some marks on it.

My Martin S1 is my beater uke and I played it everyday. Granted it’s not really high end, but it’s not cheap either. But it’s the uke that I have learnt most of the stuff on. There are so much strumming scratches near the sound hole that you would think they are part of the wood grains.

As it’s always out next to my sofa, the frets have receded a little due to the high humidity now. But it’s still very playability and affected nothing. I’m glad that Martin didn’t bind the fret edges as they most definitely have considered this situation. So I think our ukuleles, especially by reputable makers, are made to last for playing in some less than ideal condition.

So get your Clara (at least the Clara) out for what it is meant for. Just my thoughts.

Jerryc41
05-31-2019, 12:35 AM
I know what you mean. It's the same with a car. You either keep your "loved one" tucked away and never use it, or you use it and accept the "slings and arrows of outrageous fortune." It's nice receiving a new uke that is absolutely perfect, and wishing it would stay that way, but that's not life. There's nothing wrong with having "use marks" on something. The only real downside is if you decide to sell it, because everyone likes perfection.

Instruments played by professionals are expensive, and they show signs of wear. If you're buying a used ukulele, you expect to pay less than new, so an appearance that's less than new is only reasonable. I take care of my ukes, but I also play them, and if they develop imperfections over time, so be it.

Kibes37
05-31-2019, 04:56 AM
Thanks for the input and perspective guys. You are all right about just playing and letting go. All Ukes deserve a mountain top strum!

hendulele
05-31-2019, 10:49 AM
My prettiest and best-sounding concert used to be my Ohana cedar/willow with rope binding. I babied it. And then I left it on a chair at a jam in a bar. It hit the tile floor hard. Cracked on the lower bout where the top and sides meet. Nearly ripped off the bridge. I was devastated.

I took it to a luthier. She reglued the seam, but couldn't repair the gloss finish. It's no longer my prettiest concert, but it still sounds wonderful. And I don't mind taking it to gigs any more.

WestyShane
05-31-2019, 11:06 AM
He spent 10 years as a teenager back then hitchhiking around North America busking and living on the streets.

Lucky guy. I only had 6 years as a teen.

Jerryc41
05-31-2019, 11:42 AM
My prettiest and best-sounding concert used to be my Ohana cedar/willow with rope binding. I babied it. And then I left it on a chair at a jam in a bar. It hit the tile floor hard.

At every uke fest I've attended, I've heard several ukes hit the floor. I just hoped they were cheap and undamaged.

PetalumaRescuke
05-31-2019, 08:20 PM
I play and turn over vintage Martin sopranos, They are all "rescue" items. Most have had some or even extensive damage. To the point I carry them to Jams and performances as they are, no case or gig bags.
It makes me aware of how I handle the instrument.
I can fix any bumps scratches or outright trashing that may, but probably not occur.
The main reason I rescue them is to be played, not collected, strum on.

steveholt
05-31-2019, 11:09 PM
The surprising climbing skills of my 2yo daughter has given my timms a head start in beauty marks.

I think it was a blessing in disguise. It was always hoped to be a forever uke and I struggle to sell anything due to my struggles to buy lol (not a natural trader in any aspect of life) ... now, I'd struggle to sell it based on its enhanced looks/patina

Timms has thus, despite its wow irresistible volume, moved into the kitchen now and has replaced my flight tus35 as my camera I have on me.

Jerryc41
05-31-2019, 11:14 PM
The surprising climbing skills of my 2yo daughter has given my timms a head start in beauty marks.

I think it was a blessing in disguise. It was always hoped to be a forever uke and I struggle to sell anything due to my struggles to buy lol (not a natural trader in any aspect of life) ... now, I'd struggle to sell it based on its enhanced looks/patina

Pristine Timms ukes are a dime a dozen. Something with patina and beauty marks is unique and worth big bucks. :o

AQUATOPAZ
06-01-2019, 05:02 AM
Lucky guy. I only had 6 years as a teen.

Most people get 7. You were cheated. 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19.

Kenn2018
06-01-2019, 09:12 AM
I have a few ukes I leave in cases. Mostly because of humidity needs. But also because of not wanting to ding them up.

The others are out on instrument stands for easy access for playing.

I'm getting up the resolve to sell some of the ones in cases...

RafterGirl
06-01-2019, 10:14 AM
A couple months back, I went searching for a long neck soprano. I came across a used KoAloha special issue that looked nice and bought it. I’m not sure if the Reverb seller was the original owner, but the uke looked brand new. I was very stoked to have it. Now normally I don’t hesitate to add strap buttons to my ukes. This uke also has side fret markers that are tiny & top markers that blend with the fret board, so I ordered some stick on fret dots. But I’ve been super reluctant to alter this nice little uke. It’s too nice to drill for a strap button or stick anything on it. Then something terrible happened. I opened the case & there was a ding on it. Arggggh. How did that happen? I’m so careful. I’m mortified about the ding, but now I’m much more relaxed about altering this uke to make it more playable for myself. As bad as I feel every time I look at that ding, I’m way more relaxed & happy with this uke now.

PetalumaRescuke
06-01-2019, 03:04 PM
Pristine Timms ukes are a dime a dozen. Something with patina and beauty marks is unique and worth big bucks. :o
If only it were true with Martins, I'd be a $ richer man. Glad it is about the playing and playability, priceless.

intro
06-01-2019, 06:02 PM
Riffing on Jerryc41's "The Camera You Have with You" thread, a ukulele you're not afraid to play will sound much better than one that gets left in its case!

Part of my "is this too expensive" equation includes if it's pricy enough that I'd be afraid to play it. I'm pretty lazy, and if I can't keep an instrument out and at hand it's not likely to get played. My better acoustic guitar spends too much time in its case in favour of the lesser instruments that get hung on the wall year round.

There's also diminishing returns in sound quality - most of my inexpensive ukuleles sound great on their own, even if there's a noticeable difference when played side-by-side with a more expensive one (and honestly speaking, the limiting quality factor is the player not the instrument).

--Rob

Even worse, it can get to the point where you're even afraid to NOT play it, while you worry that it might come apart just sitting in it's case. To me, as beautiful as they are the high-end woodies are just not getting over the bar on fun versus worry. I gave up and bought Blackbirds and mid range lammies. For me, If I think they'll come apart, or if that "First ding" will break my heart, then they're too expensive...and they're gone.

Jerryc41
06-02-2019, 12:46 AM
I opened the case & there was a ding on it. Arggggh. How did that happen?

There must have been a large bug trapped inside the case. :D

glennerd
06-02-2019, 01:47 AM
Pristine Timms ukes are a dime a dozen. Something with patina and beauty marks is unique and worth big bucks. :o

Iíll take a dozen then! Might take a while to ding them all up though. :D

Jerryc41
06-02-2019, 01:52 AM
I’ll take a dozen then! Might take a while to ding them all up though. :D

I offer a free dinging service. :D

Nickie
06-03-2019, 12:26 PM
I don't own a single uke without a ding. The ones that weren't dinged were sold or traded.
I don't know what that means...

My banjoukes don't have dings either.
I don't know what that means...

Maybe it goes along with "We always hurt the ones we love most"???