PDA

View Full Version : How to make your case behave?



Joyful Uke
06-04-2019, 10:29 AM
I have a Crossrock case that doesn't like to stay with the lid propped open. I tried to train it, (Sit. Stay.), but that didn't seem to work. My dogs were easier to train.

Any thoughts on how to make it behave? I don't really leave the case open generally, but hate when the lid wants to slam shut while I'm taking a ukulele out or putting a ukulele in to the case. I try to leave my hand blocking the lid, but would rather not take chances.

If all else fails, I might just buy a new case. Any suggestions? I've looked at older threads on cases, but some of the cases don't seem to be made anymore, and there are probably newer ones now, too.

Are Ameritage cases worth the price? Who sells them?

Rllink
06-04-2019, 10:36 AM
I don't have an answer, but I would warn that when the case falls closed like that there is a chance that you will later glance at it that way and just pick it up without thinking, dumping your ukulele on the floor. I know from experience.

Joyful Uke
06-04-2019, 10:38 AM
I don't have an answer, but I would warn that when the case falls closed like that there is a chance that you will later glance at it that way and just pick it up without thinking, dumping your ukulele on the floor. I know from experience.

Good point. Another reason to think about upgrading the case.

mikelz777
06-04-2019, 11:20 AM
Maybe open the lid as far as it wants to go then gently push it open a little bit more. You don't want to break the hinges but maybe a little gentle hyperextension from its current position will persuade it to open a little farther so it stays open.

rainbow21
06-04-2019, 11:25 AM
It could be the hinges. But it could also be the strap limiter at the fat end of the case that restricts the opening just a bit much. Not sure if it could be stretched. But it could be cut (middle) and re-sewn so it is longer and the case opens farther, hopefully resolving the issue.

EDW
06-04-2019, 11:33 AM
I have seen people use a thin wooden dowel or chopstick to prop a case open if needed.

stevejfc
06-04-2019, 11:35 AM
A couple of things:
Check the little stumpy legs on the bottom of the case...………….making sure they are all intact. Once in a while one of the little pieces falls off. If they are ok, get a couple of small rubber washers from your hardware store and glue them on the front most legs so the case tilts slightly backward when on a flat solid surface. This should keep it open.
Armeritage are great cases, though they are very heavy and very expensive. For me, they are for that very special uke that travels a lot or gets jousted about frequently. Other well built solid cases, many of which are under $100 should do the job (and also stay open!).

bratsche
06-04-2019, 12:09 PM
I don't even like to keep any of my cases open. What's the purpose? Unlatch, open case, remove instrument, close case. Open case, replace instrument, close case, latch. Keep it Simple.

bratsche

RafterGirl
06-04-2019, 12:10 PM
Wow. I thought I was unique in this problem. My KoAloha LN soprano came with a Crossrock case that does the exact same thing. I either have to move fast, or push back more on the lid to keep it open. I also yell at mine, but not Sit & Stay. More like .....Stay Open You Little #*%#. Mine is a special issue KoAloha from 2017 and for some reason, I think the special issues were sold with the Crossrock cases. It’s a cool red tweed with three latches and it does fit perfectly, so I haven’t ditched it yet.

70sSanO
06-04-2019, 12:22 PM
It could be the hinges. But it could also be the strap limiter at the fat end of the case that restricts the opening just a bit much. Not sure if it could be stretched. But it could be cut (middle) and re-sewn so it is longer and the case opens farther, hopefully resolving the issue.

This is a decent solution. If the hinges are anything like most guitar cases, the top just folds flat, (well almost), when the retaining strap breaks loose from the case. Been there done that. Better than buying a new case.

Edit added: After looking at a few of my uke cases, it appears that a stop is built into the hinges, as opposed to my old guitar cases. You can probably check to see if the strap or the hinge stop is causing it not to open enough. If it is the strap, you will see a gap and the hinge could open more. If it is the top and bottom hinge pieces that are touching in the back, that would require some sort of mod.

Another solution is to get a lid support, but you have to make sure it clears the ukulele when it folds.

John

Joyful Uke
06-04-2019, 12:34 PM
I don't even like to keep any of my cases open. What's the purpose? Unlatch, open case, remove instrument, close case. Open case, replace instrument, close case, latch. Keep it Simple.

bratsche

I don't generally keep it open, but don't want the lid to hit the ukulele as I take it out or put it in. I try to keep my hand holding the case open, but would prefer to not have to hope that I don't forget to do that sometime. I also have a doberman who finds it necessary to run by the case when he hears me opening or closing it. I suspect he's doing a little celebration that the ukulele is going to be put away. He doesn't touch the case or ukulele, (as I said, my dogs are easier to train than the case), but a doberman stomping by might encourage the case to close, from the vibrations. (He had various problems when I adopted him, including injuries to his feet from abuse, so his gait isn't normal. But we have him healthy and happy now, more importantly.)

Some interesting suggestions on how to cope with the misbehaving case. Thanks for any and all ideas.

Joyful Uke
06-04-2019, 02:16 PM
Don't leave it in the case at home, hang it on the wall away from the dog. Make it a focal point of the room where you sit and enjoy life.
If humidity is an issue, instead of forking out for a new case, arrange for a nice humidified wall cabinet in the room.

I think the wall cabinet would cost more than a case? But making the current case workable is the best option.

Ukuleles here stay in their cases except when being played. You maybe never had a dog who can fling slobber across the room. :D

Just earlier today, I was looking at damage to a cabinet from when a Great Dane with epilepsy was having a seizure next to it, and things like that are another reason to keep things tucked safely away. Someone has to adopt the special needs dogs, even if there are ukuleles around. :-)

AQUATOPAZ
06-04-2019, 03:53 PM
I have a Crossrock case that doesn't like to stay with the lid propped open. I tried to train it, (Sit. Stay.), but that didn't seem to work. My dogs were easier to train.

Any thoughts on how to make it behave? I don't really leave the case open generally, but hate when the lid wants to slam shut while I'm taking a ukulele out or putting a ukulele in to the case. I try to leave my hand blocking the lid, but would rather not take chances.

If all else fails, I might just buy a new case. Any suggestions? I've looked at older threads on cases, but some of the cases don't seem to be made anymore, and there are probably newer ones now, too.

Are Ameritage cases worth the price? Who sells them?

Did that case EVER stay open? If the hinges have become damaged, maybe they can be replaced? Otherwise I'd just replace the case. Getting a humidified cabinet seems like overkill. A uke in a working case on a stand is much more accessible, without taking up the extra living space a cabinet would.

Joyful Uke
06-04-2019, 04:15 PM
Did that case EVER stay open? If the hinges have become damaged, maybe they can be replaced? Otherwise I'd just replace the case. Getting a humidified cabinet seems like overkill. A uke in a working case on a stand is much more accessible, without taking up the extra living space a cabinet would.

No, the case never stayed open. It sounds like Rafter Girl had the same problem?

If I decide to replace the case, what suggestions do people have? Concert size, if that matters.

For now, I'll work on some of the other suggestions, to see if I can make this one more workable.

Joyful Uke
06-04-2019, 04:18 PM
I certainly have never had a dog, mostly because I lived in rented houses and like to take long road trips. Dogs are not allowed in Australian national parks or in many tourist parks, and it costs in emotion and money to board them out. Many of my guitars and ukuleles are sitting around the living room ready to play as I choose. I keep my pots and pans and stuff on the bench or on a clean patch on the floor so I can easily find them. I can also have pot plants and a nice garden. I like to be friends with the native animals like the birds and Quendas (AKA Southern Brown bandicoot) and draw a line at mice and rats.
Some of my friends who own big dogs use a doggy door across the doorway to keep the dogs out of the living room. Its like a little fence or gate. Maybe that is an option.
Here I can buy a nice cabinet from Ikea for the same price as a cheap ukulele case, so maybe it would pay to have a look at what is available locally, you only need space for your ukulele of the day.
For your case, a length of thin wood may fit nicely along side the neck and be available to grab as soon as you open the case. Something like a wooden 12" ruler used by school children. Here they are cheap and easy to find. I don't think it is worth getting another case or a cabinet if you can use a wooden ruler or similar to keep you case open.

Different life styles, but enjoyment of ukulele unites us. :-)
Music does bring people together.

Sharpshin
06-04-2019, 04:45 PM
Off topic, but thank you for taking in those large special needs dogs!You must be a very special dog person. It is a lifestyle. I train dogs professionally and one of my favorite clients is a very sporting Great Dane. It is hard for him to drink water due to a cancerous tumor removal and subsequent radiation treatment. The water foams and goes everywhere. I love him, so glad he is healthy 3 years later, but I am fairly glad I do not live with him every day. Big props!

jksk8in
06-04-2019, 04:54 PM
I've had the same issue with an Oahu case I bought new in 2014. Not sure they've changed the design since, as the case is overall very high quality and one I'd otherwise recommend. Sadly, the lid closed while I was attempting to remove one of my ukes, and it ended up chipping the lower bout edge. :wallbash: I was so disappointed, and consequently removed the retaining straps. Problem solved, but now have to be mindful not to damage the hinges.

Steedy
06-04-2019, 05:19 PM
I have a guitar case that will not stay open, seemingly because the retaining strap is too short. Makes it tricky and hazardous to remove and return the guitar. I finally just got in the habit of sticking a book or something underneath the case to tilt it backward far enough that the lid stays open.

RafterGirl
06-04-2019, 06:00 PM
No, the case never stayed open. It sounds like Rafter Girl had the same problem?

If I decide to replace the case, what suggestions do people have? Concert size, if that matters.

For now, I'll work on some of the other suggestions, to see if I can make this one more workable.
I think it’s a design fluke with the Crossrock cases. They don’t open as far or as easily as other cases. I’ll take a look at the retaining strap on mine to see if that’s contributing to the problem.

Kenn2018
06-04-2019, 08:22 PM
Crossrock cases are not all of consistent builds. I have two and they have different fitting interiors. The straps that limit the amount the top can open are two different lengths. (Well actually attached at different points in the case.) One is fine and lets the lid stay open. The other is too short and the lid stands almost straight up at 90° when fully opend. A strong sneeze can cause it to fall closed.

The feet are molded as part of the lower outer shell. They are not an added part.

Generally, I stick my foot under the edge closest to me to tilt the whole case back so the top won't close on it's own. It's not an elegant solution, but it works. If on a table, I will put something like a song book under the edge.

Those metal latches can leave a big ding in the surface of your uke. And the metal around the edge can scratch if you're not careful. I want both hands to carefully place my uke in the case.

So yeah, prop it open or tilt it back, or lengthen the strap a little.

RafterGirl
06-05-2019, 02:48 AM
Yep, the strap is the problem on mine. It's just a smidgen too tight. It's webbing of some sort. Feels like cotton webbing. So I opened my case wide and pushed back on the lid a little to give the webbing strap a stretch. That seems to help. I don't want to cut the strap, so I'll just keep giving it a stretch & see if that's a decent solution.

ghostrdr
06-05-2019, 03:23 AM
Hmmmm. These stories are kind of a bummer. Maybe the OP should get a heavy duty gig bag like a reunion blues continental or Mono M80. Seems cheaper than an Ameritage with out the sharp teeth or points of the OP’s current case.

stevejfc
06-05-2019, 04:38 AM
These straps have been known to leave impressions and/or discolor the uke top. There was a thread not to long ago that discussed this. Apparently, a number of members either cut or removed the straps.

Joyful Uke
06-05-2019, 05:00 AM
These straps have been known to leave impressions and/or discolor the uke top. There was a thread not to long ago that discussed this. Apparently, a number of members either cut or removed the straps.

I missed that thread, so thanks for bringing that up.

So, what cases don't have these problems?

Joyful Uke
06-05-2019, 05:25 AM
Off topic, but thank you for taking in those large special needs dogs!You must be a very special dog person. It is a lifestyle. I train dogs professionally and one of my favorite clients is a very sporting Great Dane. It is hard for him to drink water due to a cancerous tumor removal and subsequent radiation treatment. The water foams and goes everywhere. I love him, so glad he is healthy 3 years later, but I am fairly glad I do not live with him every day. Big props!

Great Danes are messy enough when drinking water anyway, so I can only imagine the scene after this guy drinks water. :-) Glad to hear that he's healthy now.

As you no doubt know, they add so much to our lives.

To bring this back to ukuleles, one of mine is very sound sensitive, but she fortunately is OK with ukuleles. 4th of July is always the worst day of the year for her, so I'm already dreading that. But, until then, I can fuss about my Crossrock case that doesn't behave.

stevejfc
06-05-2019, 05:31 AM
I missed that thread, so thanks for bringing that up.

So, what cases don't have these problems?

Not sure......I've never had the problem. I do have a case or two that came without the internal strap.

Joyful Uke
06-05-2019, 05:40 AM
Not sure......I've never had the problem. I do have a case or two that came without the internal strap.

It does seem like the strap is the problem.

Which cases don't have the strap? I looked at a lot of cases on line yesterday, and don't think I saw any without that strap.

Joyful Uke
06-05-2019, 06:20 AM
A brain cell finally kicked in, and I think I'll ask someone like Mim to help me find a new case. I trust her to make sure that the case doesn't misbehave. I can always keep the Crossrock as a spare, in case UAS kicks in again and I suddenly need a case. :-)

Rllink
06-05-2019, 06:58 AM
I struggle with cases. I'm always looking for something, I don't know what. But I have seven cases and gig bags for three ukuleles. I'm still at a loss sometimes and end up just sticking the ukulele in a backpack with the neck sticking out the top and going. We humans are strange creatures. We are always looking for something else.

stevejfc
06-05-2019, 10:45 AM
It does seem like the strap is the problem.

Which cases don't have the strap? I looked at a lot of cases on line yesterday, and don't think I saw any without that strap.

Sorry, I didn't explain very clearly:confused:. The cases I have without the strap were removed by the previous owners.

bf_
06-05-2019, 11:26 AM
To throw another thought into the mix, I have been told to keep my fiddle case closed when not removing or placing an item inside. You work to maintain a proper humidity level inside your case and the fibers inside the case help to retain moisture. Leaving it open allows this moisture to escape into the surrounding air. I don’t see why this wouldn’t apply to any case for a solid wood instrument. Clearly less of a concern for those in an environment that does not have to maintain a healthy case humidity. I understand that this doesn’t help with the OP’s original question directly, but is something to think about before leaving ones case wide open during practice and play.

merlin666
06-05-2019, 12:24 PM
I don't even like to keep any of my cases open. What's the purpose? Unlatch, open case, remove instrument, close case. Open case, replace instrument, close case, latch. Keep it Simple.

bratsche

I am not familiar with these crossrock cases as all mine are fairly generic no-name products as far as I can tell. But I agree with bratsche - hold instrument firmly in the left hand while the right hand holds on to the neck of the uke, then use the right hand to open the case and hold the lid. Then place the uke in the case with the left hand hand while the right keeps the lid safely open. Then close the lid. Never place a case with an instrument on the floor as someone will drop something on it. Lots of bad things can happen during the transition of ukes to cases, so it's a good idea to have a process in place while keeping an eye on your surroundings.

70sSanO
06-05-2019, 03:12 PM
I understand that a case can close on an instrument that is half way out and cause some surface damage and that is the issue at hand. Beyond that a hard shell case should be able take whatever abuse, maybe short of running over it with a car, (maybe even survive that), and protect the instrument.

For anyone who has played out to any degree cases show the battle scars. I haven’t done so with a ukulele, but with guitars and basses. Cases get kicked, knocked around, dropped, fall out of cars, shoved into corners. There is really no end to the type of abuse. And it doesn’t matter how well you treat it, a case will end up in someone’s way. The good thing is that a good hard shell case will save the instrument.

John

Jerryc41
06-07-2019, 12:44 AM
I don't have an answer, but I would warn that when the case falls closed like that there is a chance that you will later glance at it that way and just pick it up without thinking, dumping your ukulele on the floor. I know from experience.

Definitely! Whenever a case is close, I have at least one catch snapped closed.

Jerryc41
06-07-2019, 12:46 AM
The good thing is that a good hard shell case will save the instrument.

John

That's why I can't understand why gig bags even exist. Why bother using one? Because it has a handle or a strap? A regular uke strap would let you carry it over your shoulder.

Rllink
06-07-2019, 08:07 AM
A agree. I bought two really nice gig bags, one soprano and one concert with robust back pack style straps. I think that in my mind I would be going everywhere with my ukulele on my back. That just never happened. I have however taken to sticking my soprano in an actual backpack with the neck sticking out, giving me more room for other stuff.

Nickie
06-07-2019, 09:38 AM
That's why I can't understand why gig bags even exist. Why bother using one? Because it has a handle or a strap? A regular uke strap would let you carry it over your shoulder.

Jerry,
Sometimes gig bags are used to save weight. I used one every day when I worked for hospice, I could hang it right over my nursing bag. A case would have been impossible....
Our hospice volunteers use gig bags too, it's just so much easier than dragging a heavy case all over a large ALF building, they also have to carry paperwork, handcleaner, sometimes an iPad if they have a new song to share that isn't memorized yet.

Rllink
06-07-2019, 11:54 AM
Jerry,
Sometimes gig bags are used to save weight. I used one every day when I worked for hospice, I could hang it right over my nursing bag. A case would have been impossible....
Our hospice volunteers use gig bags too, it's just so much easier than dragging a heavy case all over a large ALF building, they also have to carry paperwork, handcleaner, sometimes an iPad if they have a new song to share that isn't memorized yet.I'm sure that a lot of people find that gig bags fit for them.

RafterGirl
06-07-2019, 03:55 PM
A agree. I bought two really nice gig bags, one soprano and one concert with robust back pack style straps. I think that in my mind I would be going everywhere with my ukulele on my back. That just never happened. I have however taken to sticking my soprano in an actual backpack with the neck sticking out, giving me more room for other stuff.
Great idea. This would be good for an all day uke festival. More room for extra stuff that I’d need during the day. The hospital I work for gives us a Nursing Week gift every year. This year the gift was a nice medium sized rucksack that I can fit my Clara in. It has a drawstring top closure that works well with the uke neck sticking out.

Jerryc41
06-08-2019, 12:39 AM
Crossrock cases are not all of consistent builds.

Yes! Definitely!

Rllink
06-08-2019, 04:05 AM
Maybe Jerry's comment was a tongue in cheek comment? But I have taken my OU on a bicycle trip without a case, I just tied the uke on the top of the luggage on the rack and it was always there waiting when I stopped for a break.
Today we had winter weather here and I travelled around 100km in the car and train to the uke group. I had my uke in a soft case, the Magic Fluke Denim bag. My sopranos all fit into it. And since it was raining I carried it inside a backpack. At the venue, I put the back pack in one corner and the uke bag is kept out nearer where we play. While the zip can catch on the finish, there is no latch hardware to make a divot in the uke. I have to be careful to remember the uke is in the pack so I place it carefully on the ground or shelf or seat and don't drop it, when I take the pack off my back. However, this is standard practice if you carry laptops or other fragile things in your pack.
A thing you can do if you do keep your uke in a back pack, is to get a cardboard box which sits inside your pack where it can be kept dry and safe. You set up the box so you can top load the uke in, which means that when you take out the uke, all the stuff does not collapse into the space left by the uke, so its easy to put back in when you finish playing. Usually a uke box from a shop will do the job and when it wears out you get another one, you can spray it with paint to make it last longer.

I go down to a bike trail several times a week and ride from one town to another where there is a little bar and grill. It isn't a long ride, maybe nine miles each way, but I stop along the way back at a clearing just to watch people go by. I like to play my ukulele there. A little trailside busking. But I have a panier on my bicycle and I just stuff my Ohana soprano in that with no case, the neck sticks up out of the panier just six inches of it. I've never had a problem. I'm sure that I've picked up a few scratches along the way, but nothing worth mentioning. I mean, that is what I bought it for.