PDA

View Full Version : microphone to record with



CoLmes
05-28-2009, 01:45 PM
anyone know any good, cheap microphones to record videos with? i currently just use the built in one with my computer but it picks up a lot of background noise...

around 30 dollars i've found
the rocketfish
the usb logitech desk microphone
and gigaware found at radio shack

anyone know or used any of these before? i just want a mic that will cut out back ground noise.

Ukulele JJ
05-28-2009, 02:02 PM
This is probably going to seem obvious, but... the main reason the mic on your computer is picking up a lot of noise is because your computer is the one making the noise (the fan, the hard drive...), and the mic is right next to it. It's not so much the fault of the mic itself as it is the location.

So really any directional mic that you can position away from the noisy things is going to be a big help in reducing the background noise. Conversely, even an expensive, awesome mic is going to get a lot of noise if you position it near where your built-in mic is.

Personally, I use and recommend the Blue Snowball. But it's about $50-60 more expensive than the ones you list, so it might not be in the running.

JJ

CoLmes
05-28-2009, 02:47 PM
i actually didnt think of that being the reason.. makes sense.. but it doesnt pick up myself very well either.. ill check out the snowball.. im just trying to get a cheap one in time for the open mic on here. plus i wanna make a few vids too cause its been awhile.. i plan on asking for a more expensive one in sept around my bday cause im a cheap bastard ha

Ukulele JJ
05-28-2009, 02:54 PM
im just trying to get a cheap one in time for the open mic on here.

If you have an Xbox, you might be interested in this thread (http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/showthread.php?t=9443).

JJ

CoLmes
05-28-2009, 04:16 PM
thats awesome.. anyone know of anyone that uses this in their vids?

ogel916
08-06-2009, 10:02 PM
I have a samson CO1U. It is a usb condenser mic and it works quite well. I just dont like using it while singing and playing cuz it seems unnatural to me. I just record thru a cam corder, my voice sounds best thru that. but my mic costs about 100 bucks. i use it for vocals only, not instruments.

Pippin
08-07-2009, 11:27 AM
I use digital recording hardware rather than recording on a computer. Then I remove the media and insert it into my card-reader. I drag and drop the files onto my hard drive and work with them in MixCraft 4.5 for the final mix.

Using a stand-alone recording unit is much better for sound quality,

Ukulele JJ
08-07-2009, 12:16 PM
Using a stand-alone recording unit is much better for sound quality,

I think that might be a bit of an overgeneralization.

JJ

DaveVisi
08-07-2009, 01:04 PM
A pretty good generalization though.

Sound cards aren't exactly the best for recording high quality audio. Plus you have the PC fan noise and other things to contend with.

I'd much rather go through a good mic running through an analog mixer to an external recorder than use a computer. Although, I have done all the above but ran the mixer into the sound card of a PC that didn't have a system fan. Sounded fine for my purposes.

Ukulele JJ
08-07-2009, 01:50 PM
Sound cards aren't exactly the best for recording high quality audio.

Some internal sound cards you can get are actually quite good. And a computer-based recording system doesn't have to use an internal sound card. There are outboard pre-amp & a/d converters that are basically as good as it gets.



Plus you have the PC fan noise and other things to contend with.

Only if you're recording right next to the computer. No law says you have to.

Don't forget that most records that are being made these days are being done on the same computers people are typing their term papers and e-mailing their grandmothers on. Most studios here in Nashville are using Macs or Windows PCs, not standalone recording devices.

JJ

Pippin
08-10-2009, 10:19 AM
Some internal sound cards you can get are actually quite good. And a computer-based recording system doesn't have to use an internal sound card. There are outboard pre-amp & a/d converters that are basically as good as it gets.




Only if you're recording right next to the computer. No law says you have to.

Don't forget that most records that are being made these days are being done on the same computers people are typing their term papers and e-mailing their grandmothers on. Most studios here in Nashville are using Macs or Windows PCs, not standalone recording devices.

JJ

Yeah... and ProTools. The computer is in a control room that is away from the performers and everything is sound-proofed in the recording area. There are also flat reference monitors and high-end replicating gear. So, you, too, can do that if you put an $100,000 into the entire building, equipment, etc.

I still think that stand-alone recording gear beats a PC or a MAC, but since virtually everyone at that level is using ProTools, they are all using computers.

As for the sound cards, most are half-duplex or simply full-duplex emulation (like Sound Blaster Live Platinum was, for example). Really high-end cards use break-out boxes, like you suggested, but, still, there is RF interference, system noise, cooling fan noise, and multi-tracking is much harder, especially on a Windows system. MACs handle it better (they were better multi-tasking systems with the IBM/Motorola Power-PC processors but Steve Jobs wanted more profit per box... so they went Intel).

In the last issue of Ukulele Player Magazine, I had an article on digital recording where I addressed the issue of signal-to-noise-ratio. That is a factor in many cards because they route the incoming signal (which was clean at one time) through a DSP (digital signal processor), which adds a lot of white-noise. So there are lots more issues with a PC.

A stand-alone recording unit is much easier for the average user to get a good result.

Mayercaster
08-10-2009, 02:55 PM
I have my built in iMic, (i think thats what they call it) on my iMac.
And it picks up noise, but not computer noise, its very sensitive to any background noises. Such as the children playing in their garden next door or the phone ringing downstairs, which is quite an issue. I recently recorded me singing and playing 'Redemption Song' by Bob Marley, and realized afterwards that the phone rings for 30 seconds in the middle smh.
My main issue though, is the fact it picks up alot of the sharp air from my voice. Like say i say the word 'RempTION' or 'SHIPS' or 'PoSITION' it picks up the SHH sound very sharply, almost painful to the ear. Should I put some sort of muffler like you would see on a studio mic, between us? Like one of those thin pieces of synthetic foam like material ?

Pippin
08-10-2009, 08:09 PM
I have my built in iMic, (i think thats what they call it) on my iMac.
And it picks up noise, but not computer noise, its very sensitive to any background noises. Such as the children playing in their garden next door or the phone ringing downstairs, which is quite an issue. I recently recorded me singing and playing 'Redemption Song' by Bob Marley, and realized afterwards that the phone rings for 30 seconds in the middle smh.
My main issue though, is the fact it picks up alot of the sharp air from my voice. Like say i say the word 'RempTION' or 'SHIPS' or 'PoSITION' it picks up the SHH sound very sharply, almost painful to the ear. Should I put some sort of muffler like you would see on a studio mic, between us? Like one of those thin pieces of synthetic foam like material ?

In your case, check out a Snowball USB connected mic (Amazon.com has the best price on them). They are really nice mics and have a windscreen built into them. That will help your issue a lot.