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dtbaird859@gmail.com
08-02-2019, 01:00 PM
I have tried searching on this forum and on Google for uke chord shapes in open G without luck. Does anyone have a link, perhaps.

Jim Hanks
08-02-2019, 01:48 PM
Like this?
https://jonthysell.files.wordpress.com/2013/06/slackkeybaritoneukulelechordchart.pdf

I googled "DGBD ukulele tuning" and got quite a few hits.

dtbaird859@gmail.com
08-03-2019, 01:33 AM
Like this?
https://jonthysell.files.wordpress.com/2013/06/slackkeybaritoneukulelechordchart.pdf

I googled "DGBD ukulele tuning" and got quite a few hits.

Thanks, Jim - Exactly that! I Googled 'Open G uke' etc and got nowhere quickly. I never thought to Google DGBD. You are da man.

Jim Hanks
08-03-2019, 07:18 AM
You are da man.
de nada
:shaka:

apdsqueaky
08-03-2019, 01:13 PM
Genuinely curious because I know very little about alternate tunings [today I learned what open G tuning meant]... Why would you tune to open G?

Jim Hanks
08-03-2019, 02:09 PM
Why would you tune to open G?
I don't use it but I can see the logic. Look at the chord chart. Certain chords are a lot easier to make in open G than standard tuning. Of course, some are harder. So if you want to play a song with lots of the easy ones, then maybe you want to consider the open tuning.

Strumdaddy
08-03-2019, 04:02 PM
Another reason might be to mess with your "standard tuning" mind and discover new musical fields.
It worked for Joni Mitchell and many others; and it's fun to explore new territory.
It might also keep dementia away, hooray!!!

apdsqueaky
08-03-2019, 07:09 PM
Very interesting. Thanks for the insight! I suppose [going off of that earlier thread about capos and stuff] that it may sound or feel a little bit different too. I guess I should try it sometime. It'd be an interesting workout in fundamentals and music theory.

Arcy
08-03-2019, 10:10 PM
Open tunings are a lot of fun with a slide!

There are several that are close enough to GCEA that you don't need to change strings. GBDG is open G and no more than a step off on any string. GCEC is only one and a half steps up on the a string. ACEG is not quite open (it's an inversion of standard) and gives three string barres for both minor and major chords.

Slides are a also a good alternate when you slice your fretting fingers ;)

Barrytone
08-03-2019, 10:50 PM
Open tunings allow for greater freedom to fret melody notes while allowing unfretted strings to ring in key or harmony. Many guitarist who play blues based music use open tunings.
I like experimenting but I often forget or do not even know what my Uke strings are tuned to. One of these days I'll clip a tuner on and check. Providing the sound is what I want that is what counts.

Jim Hanks
08-04-2019, 02:47 AM
GCEC is only one and a half steps up on the a string.
Be careful with that one. The 'a' string is often higher tension than the rest already and trying to go up 3 semitones could easily snap. Probably safer on soprano

Tootler
08-04-2019, 11:01 AM
Be careful with that one. The 'a' string is often higher tension than the rest already and trying to go up 3 semitones could easily snap. Probably safer on soprano

GCEG is also open C and involves tuning the A string Down a tone. A lot safer than tuning up 3 semitones and the reduction in tension is actually quite small.

Edit to add, the only time I've had a string break was retuning a soprano up to ADF#B and it was the A string that broke. Admittedly, the strings had been on for some time and were probably due for a change anyway.