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View Full Version : Returning my Ohai Tenor...



vahn
07-10-2009, 01:14 PM
So finally something bad to say abt the 'Ohai... It started seperating on me.

http://i271.photobucket.com/albums/jj130/vahn84/100_6052.jpg

I have to send it back to get it repaired. To anyone who got an Ohai: I would stay away from flourocarbon strings, i think the higher tension did it though I had EJ46 High Tension D'addario pro artes on with no problem.

I tried the Savarez Alliance which have a higher tension and I got intonation problems and some buzzing so I switched right back to the pro artes I had just taken off (my A string had a nick but they still played) and got the buzz that had not been there before w/ the pro artes.



On a similar note: an 8 string is designed for 8 strings of tension correct? so if I destrung 4 of them, could my Lanikai 0-8E handle 4 strings of Savarez Alliance tension? I really loved the sound of those strings, and I was thinking about turning my 8-string into a low G 4-string while my Ohai is gone for a month or so.

bbycrts
07-10-2009, 01:59 PM
I'm no expert by any stretch of the imagination - but I can't imagine that kind of damage being done by fluorocarbon strings - if the neck was separating, maybe - but what I see in the photo is the back, and that just seems hinky. Besides - they're built to handle ukulele strings, regardless of the manufacture, aren't they?

Let us know if they say anything about it when they get it - that is a scary separation!

Jim X-S
07-10-2009, 02:09 PM
Looks like they just got skimpy on the glue. I've always been told that when it comes to woodworking, the glue joint is actually stronger then the glue. Not something that would be detectable with a quality check before moving the instrument out of the factory. Probably a new person working on the line that day and no one checking his work on that step.

But yeah, I imagine it is a hassle and disappointing to be short the uke and sending it back.

Seems like it would be kind of nice to have a "disappointing quality" thread on this site. Where folks could post things like buzzing strings and cracks. It might help improve quality standards of the manufacturers.

Have a Great Day,
Jim

seeso
07-10-2009, 02:13 PM
Hmm... another not so ringing endorsement for the ohai Pono.

Kanaka916
07-10-2009, 02:17 PM
Gotta agree with bbycrts, I don't think high tension strings would cause that type of separation. If anything, you would probably see the bridge go first.

thejumpingflea
07-10-2009, 02:17 PM
Hmm... another not so ringing endorsement for the ohai Pono.

Yeah, I had high hopes too. Oh well.

Boozelele
07-10-2009, 06:36 PM
I wish the back would have peeled off of mine, it would have saved me a bundle in shipping costs. Are you going to have it replaced? or get something else?

BrotherUke
07-11-2009, 12:00 AM
On the positive side, it's the kind of defect that can be repaired and you would never know that it ever happened.

ukantor
07-11-2009, 01:33 AM
I agree with previous replies. That separation could not be caused by string tension. The heel block is under there, and the back is glued directly to it. It should be one of the strongest joints on the uke. I was given an Ohana soprano that had exactly the same problem. I was concerned that the wood might have been impregnated with oil or something, which would make a glued joint very weak, so after gluing and clamping, I screwed a Canadian one cent coin to it, with the screw going into the heel block. That fixed it! It plays and sounds just fine. Of course, you would only do that with a uke you have not paid for.

The coin doesn't HAVE to be Canadian, I just happened to have one, dated 1882, that someone had pierced. It looks kinda cool.

John Colter.

ichadwick
07-11-2009, 02:41 AM
...I would stay away from flourocarbon strings, i think the higher tension did it

...an 8 string is designed for 8 strings of tension correct? so if I destrung 4 of them, could my Lanikai 0-8E handle 4 strings of Savarez Alliance tension? I really loved the sound of those strings, and I was thinking about turning my 8-string into a low G 4-string while my Ohai is gone for a month or so.

According to ukuleles.com (http://www.ukuleles.com/Technology/strings.html)(Kawika, Inc) the typical tension on a tenor is 39 lbs. That's not likely to cause the back to separate. Most wood glues are rated far higher than that - 200lbs or more. An 8-string is 83 lbs so it can handle re-stringing as a four easily.

I doubt the tension had anything to do with it. You'd more likely see the top warp or the bridge separate first.

My guess would be oils. Wood needs to be cleaned before gluing to make sure no oils remain on the surface. Some people use acetone to make sure none remain, but others just sand them off. Glues won't bond well with oil, and can leave a join weak. Could be someone missed a spot and your local heat/humidity did the rest. Some woods still express a little oil after manufacture, too.

cocohonk
07-11-2009, 06:58 AM
That is too bad, I'm so sorry about your uke! I hope the maunfactureres could help you with this, no charge, as it sounds like it was definitely a quality control/glue issue. I can't imagine how I'd feel if my new uke fell apart in what, a month's time or so.

On the other hand, having read the other reviews on the Pono Ohai, I have to say I still adore mine completely (though, I have a concert and not a tenor, which probably isn't an important distinction).

I guess it was good that I got to inspect the instrument prior to buying, but so far (knock on ohai wood) it's still sturdy as a horse. I didn't find the sustain to be a problem at all, and I think the instrument does sound very nice. Weirdly enough, having tried some aquilas, I switched back to the original gold koo'olau strings - They give the best tones and are less 'sticky/chalky' than the aquilas when I strum/pick. I will try some other strings later though to see if there's a difference. But anyway, I don't have any complaints in how the instrument sounds. I think it's great!

It's no solid Koa, of course, but for the price (mine was about 220 for the concert), I think it's as good as any in that price range. (Provided that the neck isn't falling off, of course!) The only minor quibble I have (but for me living in a small apartment, is actually a good thing) would be that while it sounds beautiful, it is not a very loud instrument. So for those who need the volume, this probably won't be it. Obviously I'm not really qualified to make a review of the instrument, seeing that the only other uke I own was a piece of crap, so take what you will from this, but I did try a Kala mango and a Kala solid Mahogany one with the Pono Ohai prior to purchase, and I did prefer the sound of the ohai to the others.

Anyway, I do seem to be the only one who's enjoying her pono ohai immensely at the moment, and after hearing this story, I don't suppose a lot of people would want to buy one either, given it sounds like the line needs improvement and quality control. That kind of blows.

jdmcnasty
07-11-2009, 07:11 AM
I'm sending my Pono Ohai concert back. I just really don't like how it sounds. I actually had flourocarbon strings on it too so it's a good thing they weren't on long enough to pull the wood apart.

deach
07-11-2009, 09:13 AM
Wow that sucks.

Boozelele
07-11-2009, 11:53 AM
Wow that sucks.

Words of wisdom my friend, words of wisdom.

inkandsilver
07-11-2009, 02:38 PM
Anyway, I do seem to be the only one who's enjoying her pono ohai immensely at the moment

Nope, Coco, I am really enjoying mine too. It's been kinda discouraging to read the negative reviews, especially from much more knowledgeable players than I am. I sort of wish I could have just retained my blissful naivete, thinking I had an instrument that anyone would love.

I do wish it had a little more volume. I guess I should have waited to pull the trigger until the reviews came in, but I figured a new Pono was a can't-miss.

On the other hand, the tone is sweet and complex, and I love to hear it.

Has anyone tried something like Worth Clears to try to bring this instrument out of its shell?

To the OP, very sorry for your misfortune. I'll have to keep an eye on mine.

Now I need to go play.

seeso
07-11-2009, 02:59 PM
Nope, Coco, I am really enjoying mine too. It's been kinda discouraging to read the negative reviews, especially from much more knowledgeable players than I am. I sort of wish I could have just retained my blissful naivete, thinking I had an instrument that anyone would love.

Hey, as long as you like it, that's all that matters.

PickNStrum
07-11-2009, 04:29 PM
As far as the separation on the back of the instrument. I can't imagine how string tension could be the problem. Most likely I think
-not enough glue
-oil not removed well enough before gluing
-possibly the porosity of ohai requires different glue?

In any case it's a minor issue considering Ko'olau's warranty on their instruments and how great it sounds for the price. Have you asked if they would just replace the instrument instead of repairing considering you just bought it?

Now as far as sound quality, the only negative comment I have is that it dosen't project as well as mahogany or koa. Since I tend to play on the quieter side, I prefer the tenor as the larger body more than makes up for that. I also noticed that lifting the back of the instrument off your belly helps a lot. (quite challenging with my ever growing stomach)

The really exciting thing about these instruments is the tonal quality for the price. For me, this is my primary consideration when choosing instruments for my store and myself. The tenor ohai is pretty impressive with really clear tones, accurate intonation, and sweet sustain. If I could only cough up $300 for one instrument, this would be it.

Some photos I took the other day... http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#/album.php?aid=88515&id=82081018620&ref=mf

dirk.li
07-11-2009, 04:35 PM
So finally something bad to say abt the 'Ohai... It started seperating on me. [...]

Wahhh... I have a Pono All-Ohai Tenor, too and I'm using Fluorocarbons on it! (Self-made FC strings from Japanese fishing line). I calculated a high tension set since I thought the sturdy-looking Ohai uke could take it...

I guess I'll change to normal tension now!

I think the Ohai lacks projection 'cause the Ohai wood of the top seems to be rather thick. Does anyone know why? I guess this kind of wood requires some more thickness for some reason?

I guess the lack in projection of ALL-Ohai ukes is why Pono now offers Ohai ukes with spruce tops - seems logical to me.

My Ohai has a pickup and the amped sound is nice! The instrument looks and feels really tough & stury, so I'm quite surprised that you encountered these problems. Good luck with the repaired uke! ;)

vahn
07-11-2009, 06:51 PM
Ko'olau is making me pay to have it shipped back to Hawaii (quite expensive) and then i have to wait over a month to get it back. Should I be dissatisfied?

I originally called MGM, who I got the uke from and he told me to call ko'olau. This was supposed to be a combined fathers day/birthday present, I got some money towards it for fathersday and my birthday is July 22nd and now I'm not going to even have my uke on my birthday... If this happened already and there just going to fix it and send it back how do I know theres not going to be more quality control issues with that uke. Would I be out of line asking for a new one? The guy Dean was kind of short with me and told me that I needed to have it shipped to them and I thought that sucked that I had to pay for that.

Boozelele
07-11-2009, 09:48 PM
Dude, I feel really bad for you. Should you be dissatisfied? I sure would be.

nikolo727
07-11-2009, 10:00 PM
Yeah I would be dissatisfied. The guy seemed like a jerk even though you had a problem that wasnt your fault. In fact that was the companies fault instead of yours. He was probubly short with you because people probubly have been calling in to report these mix ups with this type of uke. It might be the wood type. It can be more rigid and denser and thus not holding with the glue that they regularly use. You should get a new one, or have it fixed free of charge. thats just incredible. it wasnt the strings dont worry. thats just bad business.

Link
07-11-2009, 10:58 PM
Got a money back option still? (Sorry if you answered that somewhere)

I'd be way pissed. I'm staying FAAAR away from this uke line.

deach
07-12-2009, 01:42 AM
....

I think the Ohai lacks projection 'cause the Ohai wood of the top seems to be rather thick.
...

I thought so too. Not only that, but it seems like they used telephone poles for bracing.

seeso
07-12-2009, 05:17 AM
Ko'olau is making me pay to have it shipped back to Hawaii (quite expensive) and then i have to wait over a month to get it back. Should I be dissatisfied?

I originally called MGM, who I got the uke from and he told me to call ko'olau. This was supposed to be a combined fathers day/birthday present, I got some money towards it for fathersday and my birthday is July 22nd and now I'm not going to even have my uke on my birthday... If this happened already and there just going to fix it and send it back how do I know theres not going to be more quality control issues with that uke. Would I be out of line asking for a new one? The guy Dean was kind of short with me and told me that I needed to have it shipped to them and I thought that sucked that I had to pay for that.

Absolutely, you should be dissatisfied. The squeaky wheel gets the grease, man. Make some noise! None of this is your fault. DO NOT feel bad about any of it.

vahn
07-12-2009, 07:58 AM
Got a money back option still? (Sorry if you answered that somewhere)

I'd be way pissed. I'm staying FAAAR away from this uke line.

I dont know. I originally purchased from Musicguymic, who directed me to ko'olau. I wonder if it would be possible to return to MGM for a different uke and maybe he could warranty it out through ko'olau, but I don't want to put MGM out. He didn't do anything wrong.

danged
07-12-2009, 12:54 PM
I dont know. I originally purchased from Musicguymic, who directed me to ko'olau. I wonder if it would be possible to return to MGM for a different uke and maybe he could warranty it out through ko'olau, but I don't want to put MGM out. He didn't do anything wrong.

I always recommend purchasing from a Brick & Mortar Store, and the internet as a last alternative. If this was purchased from a retail store who is an authorized dealer, the store would take care of any problems for you. I know this because I am a Ko'olau / Pono dealer. I have sold many Pono Ukulele's and have not encountered any problems with the Ohai models. I carry several different brands of Ukulele's and Ko'olau / Pono are one of the highest quality manufacturer's on the market.

If, a problem occurs with a ukulele purchased from a reputable retail store, the store would take full responsibility to take care of the problem. When the store notifies the manufacturer, whether it is Pono or any others, the manufacturer will offer to pay for the repair to the dealer (good to have an in house luthier, which my store offers) or replace the product with a new one. Had this been my store, I would have offered to repair or replace your ukulele and let you make the decision. The dealer should pay for all shipping cost. If you wanted a different model, no problem, as I would be credited by Pono upon returning the ukulele to them, with the shipping cost incurred by the store and not the customer.

When you got the uke, you were happy, unfortunately something went wrong, and you needed service. Part of your frustration is having to pay for the shipping charges back to Hawaii and having to get the problem resolved yourself, and waiting for resolution and having to deal with it on your own and having no ukulele while you wait several weeks. That is a service problem encountered in dealing with any internet purchase. Had you bought from a local dealer, they would have taken care of the problem and you should have never had to contact Ko'olau directly. You would have a new uke and this post would have never developed.

Most retailers would also be price competitive with most internet type sellers, but you should keep in mind "customer service". It should always be the dealers responsibility to take care of their customers, that is why they make money from you, through selling you the product. When a dealer purchases from the manufacturer, the dealer always pays for the shipping to their store, pays rent/insurance/utilities for the store, and allows people to visit the store and hold the ukulele and play it before making their decision to make a purchase, and have someone to go to after the purchase for any concerns.

Just my 2 cents, as I understand your frustrations, but I have people come into my store and try the ukulele, and then buy it online. They even have the nerve to ask me questions about their ukulele, after they have bought it somewhere else. Had the potential customer say that they were thinking of buying the ukulele online, and let me know from where, I would work something out to get your business, as times are tough in this economy. Things happen and that's why there are warranties to remedy the problem, Pono even stands behind their product for 5 years instead of the standard 1 year like most manufacturers.

MGM
07-12-2009, 01:20 PM
last i looked my store was Brick and Morter..Also problems as exhanges and actions are always done by us. As for Cracks These are done by Koolau themselves..we are the same as any other and thats why the customer was referred to Koolau.

When a dealer purchases from the manufacturer, the dealer always pays for the shipping to their store, pays rent/insurance/utilities for the store, and allows people to visit the store and hold the ukulele and play it before making their decision to make a purchase, and have someone to go to after the purchase for any concerns. Last I looked this all applies to me

vahn
07-12-2009, 02:11 PM
last i looked my store was Brick and Morter..Also problems as exhanges and actions are always done by us. As for Cracks These are done by Koolau themselves..we are the same as any other and thats why the customer was referred to Koolau.

When a dealer purchases from the manufacturer, the dealer always pays for the shipping to their store, pays rent/insurance/utilities for the store, and allows people to visit the store and hold the ukulele and play it before making their decision to make a purchase, and have someone to go to after the purchase for any concerns. Last I looked this all applies to me

The only Brick and Mortor pono dealer anywhere in my remote area is in downtown chicago, a couple hours drive, and with gas that can add up, especially if I go there and theres nothing I like.

MGM would it be possible to return the uke to you, and exchange it for a different model? I am most depressed about having had it less than two weeks and having to send it away for well over a month, considering it was supposed to be for my birthday, which is in like 10 days.

MGM
07-12-2009, 02:12 PM
of course email me

seeso
07-12-2009, 02:20 PM
The only Brick and Mortor pono dealer anywhere in my remote area is in downtown chicago, a couple hours drive, and with gas that can add up, especially if I go there and theres nothing I like.

MGM would it be possible to return the uke to you, and exchange it for a different model? I am most depressed about having had it less than two weeks and having to send it away for well over a month, considering it was supposed to be for my birthday, which is in like 10 days.

There's a Pono dealer in downtown Chicago? Where?

danged
07-12-2009, 02:28 PM
last i looked my store was Brick and Morter..Also problems as exhanges and actions are always done by us. As for Cracks These are done by Koolau themselves..we are the same as any other and thats why the customer was referred to Koolau.

When a dealer purchases from the manufacturer, the dealer always pays for the shipping to their store, pays rent/insurance/utilities for the store, and allows people to visit the store and hold the ukulele and play it before making their decision to make a purchase, and have someone to go to after the purchase for any concerns. Last I looked this all applies to me


Where is your retail store located? I would like to visit the next time I'm in Oahu, my father is resting at the Hawaiian Memorial Park in Kaneohe, and I visit often.

I was not speaking about your specific business, as you have a very good reputation and customer feedback. I was speaking about buying from retail stores vs. the internet. There are many people that have no direct access to your products, and for them you offer a tremendous service.

bbycrts
07-12-2009, 02:42 PM
Ko'olau is making me pay to have it shipped back to Hawaii (quite expensive) and then i have to wait over a month to get it back. Should I be dissatisfied?

I originally called MGM, who I got the uke from and he told me to call ko'olau. This was supposed to be a combined fathers day/birthday present, I got some money towards it for fathersday and my birthday is July 22nd and now I'm not going to even have my uke on my birthday... If this happened already and there just going to fix it and send it back how do I know theres not going to be more quality control issues with that uke. Would I be out of line asking for a new one? The guy Dean was kind of short with me and told me that I needed to have it shipped to them and I thought that sucked that I had to pay for that.

I've emailed Ko'olau a couple times and always gotten a response directly from John Kitakis - Sounds like MGM is going to take care of you, but I wonder if an email of the problem to John might be of some benefit as well?

MGM
07-12-2009, 03:15 PM
Next to Windward Mall on Alaloa Street

haolejohn
07-12-2009, 03:41 PM
Next to Windward Mall on Alaloa Street

I wished I had known you were there. I would have come visited. Bummers.

KC8AFW
07-12-2009, 03:53 PM
There's a Pono dealer in downtown Chicago? Where?

I'd like to know too...I'm right across the lake from you (Seeso). I could hop on the South Shore...

danged
07-12-2009, 05:35 PM
Next to Windward Mall on Alaloa Street

Mahalo!:shaka:

Kekani
07-12-2009, 06:34 PM
I think its absolutely amazing where this thread has gone. Of course I'll add in my $.02, at the risk of having added it on other threads only to have feedback saying "keep it to yourself." So maybe I'll just ask some questions so I get some clarity.

If I didn't know any better, and I read this thread (which I did), I would come away with the following perceptions on Pono `Ukulele made of Ohai:
High tension strings may cause the back to split/ I have to be careful on what I string this instrument with.
Quality control on Pono `Ukulele is not that great, and I need to stay away from it.
There is speculation on whether the glue joint was good, or if its the wood's fault, etc.

From the information gleaned here, I can deduce this - the instrument was built in Java, finished in Hawai`i, and sat around until it got shipped out (to the mainland?).

Anyway, I do have a question: Does anyone really know why it split?

-Aaron

vahn
07-12-2009, 08:05 PM
I think its absolutely amazing where this thread has gone. Of course I'll add in my $.02, at the risk of having added it on other threads only to have feedback saying "keep it to yourself." So maybe I'll just ask some questions so I get some clarity.

If I didn't know any better, and I read this thread (which I did), I would come away with the following perceptions on Pono `Ukulele made of Ohai:
High tension strings may cause the back to split/ I have to be careful on what I string this instrument with.
Quality control on Pono `Ukulele is not that great, and I need to stay away from it.
There is speculation on whether the glue joint was good, or if its the wood's fault, etc.

From the information gleaned here, I can deduce this - the instrument was built in Java, finished in Hawai`i, and sat around until it got shipped out (to the mainland?).

Anyway, I do have a question: Does anyone really know why it split?

-Aaron

Its not so much a split as a seperation, the whole back is pulling back slightly... I have had it destrung for a few days, and looking at it it doesnt look nearly as bad, just like maybe a not quite perfect joint connection but the pictures were taken with strings in full tension, and its pulling apart. I can't image the climate bieng and closer to HI at any other time of the year, coming to wisconsin, its hot and exceedingly humid right now.

The shop in Chicago is wonderwall music shoppe & emporium. they have sitars and ukes i think. http://www.sitaremporium.com/WonderwallEmporium.html

clayton56
07-12-2009, 11:46 PM
and I like its tone. Yeah, it is pretty quiet, but I don't perform, I only record, so the issue for me is how the sound is picked up at the mic. I have to say, it's pretty good.

I tried it with several types of strings, most sounded kind of tinny, especially the flourocarbon. Maybe the Fremont clear would be good, but I had Martins, which are light. Anyway, because it's such a strongly built uke, I decided to try heavy strings. I had a set of Kamaka Ohta-San, which have a .028" first string (as opposed to .019 for Martin and .022 for Fremont). Well, they rocked. But they sounded a little rubbery, that's the nature of those strings. Then I tried, of all things, a baritone set (Martin) which have a .027" first string and the tone was great when picked up by the mic. It sounds like a full-bodied guitar. The wood seems to have great sustain and good character, capable of quite a bit of sublety.

A lot of the "sound" we like that sounds rich to us can come across as noise on a recording. I have that problem with mahogany ukes, I get a "woof woof" of sound underneath the notes when strumming. It's been easy for me to play too hard on certain ukes (I only have mahogany so far, a Pono and a Loprinzi, plus a Pono Concert). This Ohai lets me whale on it, strum hard, and the sound keeps coming, without the noise.

Also, I played all my ukes for the mic, sitting in the same position with the same recording level setting for all. The Ohai was 1-2 db quieter than the others with regular strings. But when I recorded with the baritone set, the volume was equal to the others. It doesn't sound loud in my lap, but the mic doesn't lie. I think what I am getting is only the note itself, not the "woof" of presence, so it sounds quieter and less satisfying to me. But what the mic picks up is very good.

Pono did a design change for its sopranos this year, now they're standard scale (before they were 12 3/4" scale). The body is the same, so the bridge is moved about 1/2" down, closer to the end of the soundboard. I wonder about the wisdom of this, although most ukes are made this way. I'm going to hang on to my mahogany soprano which has the bridge more to the middle of the soundboard.

I think it's good to use this wood, but I can see why most people might not care for it. The feedback we get from hearing the instrument is a big reason why we play, regardless of how it sounds to others.

I doubt if there's a problem with construction, this uke feels solid. Switching to lighter strings will only make it sound tinny and quiet, if it's heavily built it will need heavier strings to wake it up.

Hey, about returning the uke, sending it to Koohlau or MGM would be the same thing, since they're both in Hawaii. You would have to send it back, if you bought it locally you'd have to pay your own gas to return it to the store. It's the nature of the beast. Too bad it happened, but I'm sure they will honor the warranty.

vahn
07-13-2009, 06:44 AM
I did like the tone of the Ohai, but this is my second Pono (first one was a koa) and they are 0-2 so far as far as having quality issues. I may have just gotten some bad apples but it honestly has turned me off to the brand. This uke would be great for say a musician or guitarist who has a ukulele song or 2 to play in his set, like my friend Chad, who might do a little composition, a little recording, and some live shows (I thought it sounded great amplified) but for me I play unamplified 95% of the time and I just desire something with more projection.

Also I hate not having a cutaway. I really prefer tenor scale, but ATM anysong where I'm going above the 12th fret and I'm stuck using my concert scale electric cutaway (with 22 frets it can get rather cramped down there) I understand this is purely personal, And that the next line of Ohai's will include a picked-up tenor cutaway.

So MGM is letting me exchange it for a different uke, and I'm thinking of going with the Kala Lacewood Sprucetop Tenor Cutaway. Though it seems like a step down going from Pono to Kala, but you have to keep in mind that its the lowest end Pono to the higher end kalas (this ones all solid) One things settled though, Tax return time next year I'm going to step up to the 700-1000 range and get something I really want, maybe a custom or some other amped high end tenor cutaway, curly koa....

In a perfect world, I wouldnt have had any seperation on the uke, the Savarez Alliances would have given it the punch it seemed to be lacking, And I could enjoy its lovely tone till I had the scratch to order something really nice

seeso
07-13-2009, 07:23 AM
The shop in Chicago is wonderwall music shoppe & emporium. they have sitars and ukes i think. http://www.sitaremporium.com/WonderwallEmporium.html

That ain't Chicago, that's Oak Park, but right on! Thanks for the link. Had no idea there was a Kamaka dealer around. Very cool. :cool:

vahn
07-13-2009, 01:27 PM
When you live 45 mins outside of milwaukee in SE Wisconsin, that's "Chicago" you'd be suprised how general that term can be...

Just have to say that I just got off the phone with MGM, and he sending me out a new ukulele before mine even gets back to him (good thing too because he let me ship it slow poke shipping, which was only $13) so that I can have it on time for my Birthday!!!

Once again this is a great story about great customer service. I literally had no complaints from my sale with MGM, but he still stepped up and not only did a lot better than the manufacturer as far as dealing with my concerns, but is making the extra effort to make sure I get my uke on time for my B-day.

I also have to say that this is the second time recently that problems have been resolved via the UU forums, its great to have a resource where I can literally be heard by leaders in the ukulele industry. This place is awesome and theres something Hawaiin about the uke that transends borders to bring a sense of community among uke players/lovers.. I used to always want to go to Jamaica for my honeymoon but now I have to go to hawaii... with an extra $2000...

Melissa82
07-13-2009, 02:28 PM
When you live 45 mins outside of milwaukee in SE Wisconsin, that's "Chicago" you'd be suprised how general that term can be...

Just have to say that I just got off the phone with MGM, and he sending me out a new ukulele before mine even gets back to him (good thing too because he let me ship it slow poke shipping, which was only $13) so that I can have it on time for my Birthday!!!

Once again this is a great story about great customer service. I literally had no complaints from my sale with MGM, but he still stepped up and not only did a lot better than the manufacturer as far as dealing with my concerns, but is making the extra effort to make sure I get my uke on time for my B-day.

I also have to say that this is the second time recently that problems have been resolved via the UU forums, its great to have a resource where I can literally be heard by leaders in the ukulele industry. This place is awesome and theres something Hawaiin about the uke that transends borders to bring a sense of community among uke players/lovers.. I used to always want to go to Jamaica for my honeymoon but now I have to go to hawaii... with an extra $2000...That's so good to hear!! I have to agree, this forum is awesome.