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Beetbox
08-02-2009, 06:53 PM
Hey umm whens a good time to start learning songs and reading tabs. Currently im working on chords and chord progressions but ive already learned one chord progression and 7 chords.

Also ive seen a pic of four ukes side by side comparing the sizes and i cant refind it anyone know of a pisture?

btw i think i have uas which im guessing stands for ukulele addiction syndrome. Am i right? Ive practiced my uke so much i forgot to practice my snare music (im in my high school marching band) so tomorrow will be a bad day.

ukulelearp
08-02-2009, 07:49 PM
Hey umm whens a good time to start learning songs and reading tabs. Currently im working on chords and chord progressions but ive already learned one chord progression and 7 chords.

Also ive seen a pic of four ukes side by side comparing the sizes and i cant refind it anyone know of a pisture?

btw i think i have uas which im guessing stands for ukulele addiction syndrome. Am i right? Ive practiced my uke so much i forgot to practice my snare music (im in my high school marching band) so tomorrow will be a bad day.

1. I didn't even learn chords until AFTER i knew a few riffs from tabs. Whenever you're comfortable you should start.

2. I'm not sure where to find it, maybe a search?

3. UAS=Ukulele Addiction Syndrome. Way too common.

itsme
08-02-2009, 09:03 PM
btw i think i have uas which im guessing stands for ukulele addiction syndrome.
I believe it means ukulele ACQUISITION syndrome, meaning the urge to buy more ukes. :)

Citrus
08-02-2009, 10:56 PM
Order isn't too important. I like to think I went the normal route of starting off with easy instrumentals of hot crossed buns and what not then moving on to easy songs. Gonna toss this at ya though, I bet with marching band, all the time you hear about how you have to get the fundamentals down before you even touch the music. Like a million scales followed by practicing basic rhythms in front of a mirror for hours on end.
That kind of stuff does 2 things, makes you good, and can chip away at your desire to play. Remember you're playing ukulele for yourself, if you wanna do all the rehearsal of learning all the chords in the world, playing all the scales, and being able to precisely hit obscure tripleted dotted thirty second note what nots then you will get good but your motivation will drop fast (especially if you already have to do all the same stuff on other instruments).
That rant out of the way, I'd recommend starting ass backwards, find some songs you like, and then learn the chords and riffs after that. You can't do that when you're in a band that's changing music every few months, but when its just you, you can do whatever you like and learn from that.

sukie
08-03-2009, 03:28 AM
Why not start learning them now? There's tons of stuff to learn. Good luck.

Beetbox
08-03-2009, 03:47 AM
Ok so is over the rainbow a good song for beginners? because its one of the songs that inspired me to play ukulele.

BBcakes
08-03-2009, 09:38 AM
Ok so is over the rainbow a good song for beginners? because its one of the songs that inspired me to play ukulele.

Sure! Why not? :) Try it out and if it's too hard, the you know to start with something even simpler.

Beetbox
08-03-2009, 09:42 AM
Yea im having trouble learning songs because it doesnt have notes or beats just the chord to play in order. Nothing like drum tabs

uber_goober
08-03-2009, 03:11 PM
I'd say you should learn songs when you want to learn them. There's a great variety of music out there, and whatever you're into, you should be able to find some tunes you'd like to start out with. It's easier to learn when you have a goal in sight (like learning a particular tune). We all get into music to play music/songs...not to play scales and chords (not my line...a line from the great Victor Wooten).

Over the Rainbow isn't too hard to strum through. If you want to learn it, go for it. Just take your time. Work on a small piece at a time. There's no prize for rushing, but there is one for having fun (amusingly, fun is its own reward).

And yes, tabs don't usually have great rhythmic notation (though some do). It helps to work on a tab of a tune you really know by heart (from a rhythm and structure perspective). Then you can just use the tab to fill in the notes.

Hope that helps and remember to just have fun,

-John

schuermurrman
08-03-2009, 06:24 PM
Yea im having trouble learning songs because it doesnt have notes or beats just the chord to play in order. Nothing like drum tabs

I had the same problem when I started on tabs. I would try to have the tab up while playing the song sometimes to see where I could get them to match up. I usually couldn't play it at fast as the song when I first started out...but you can play the song and pause it and play through a bit of the tab and get the feel for where each note should go.

Better practice that snare though!! Don't want to get in trouble!!

ihavenotea
08-04-2009, 07:50 AM
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That rant out of the way, I'd recommend starting ass backwards, find some songs you like, and then learn the chords and riffs after that. You can't do that when you're in a band that's changing music every few months, but when its just you, you can do whatever you like and learn from that.

I agree. It is so much fun to just try different songs, sing, strum, and goof around with the Ukulele. Once you have some basic chord progressions under your belt, you can do all sorts of stuff and just play. May not be anything you would perform for others, but you will be having fun.


Yea im having trouble learning songs because it doesnt have notes or beats just the chord to play in order. Nothing like drum tabs

I struggle a lot with finding rhythms. Even when I know a song well. Most material on the internet is of the Lyrics and Chords form. Or, frequently, tablature without strong beat indicators.

I find that using a Fake Book with real lead sheets really speeds my ability to learn a song. If you are unfamiliar with them, a Lead Sheet will have the melody written out in traditional notation, with chords above and lyrics bellow.

I find it super helpful to know where the pickups are, what the vocal rhythm is, etc. to make everything fit correctly. You can find Fake Books at any music store. You probably want a Pop or Rock fake book, as most of the contents of a Jazz fake book will be overwhelming (especially without a lot of theory).

Ukulele JJ
08-04-2009, 09:15 AM
You probably want a Pop or Rock fake book, as most of the contents of a Jazz fake book will be overwhelming (especially without a lot of theory).


I agree. Fake books are great, especially if you're not familiar enough with the melody to be able to play just from a chord sheet.

Two of my favorite non-Jazz fakebooks are the Ultimate Christmas Fakebook (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B000XZX4HI) (assuming one celebrates Christmas) and the Great Composers Fakebook (http://www.amazon.com/dp/0825617022) (great for jamming with your classically-trained friends!)

Oh, and don't forget that the "Jumpin' Jim" books are essentially mini-fakebooks.

It would be great if someone came out with a big ol' Hawai'ian music fakebook. Something like He Mele Aloha (http://www.amazon.com/dp/0974256420), but with melodies written out.

JJ

EdLew1s
08-05-2009, 06:46 AM
Go to tab when ever you want.... It's the only way forward!!!