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LindsayOfSaturn
08-04-2009, 07:46 PM
Been playing my uke and playing a little blues, I really love it, and I think it will probably become my main playing type on the uke. I like it a lot, and while i am still learning the blues I am already thinking about that sound for my next uke. Right now I have a tenor ovation uke, which is nice, but a tad bit bright. I'm looking for that deep bluesy southern drawl with some twang! I wouldn't want to go any smaller though, Probably stay at a tenor, or move up to a baritone uke(although I really dont want to have to re-learn chords in a way) for the next one. I like a big sized uke. Which one do you guys think fits the bill? I'm liking the Risa Ellie Tenor Uke for the blues sound but at about $500 US that's a bit much, I'm a poor college student! :eek: I may not be able to buy my next uke till I am out of college :( but.... what do you guys think?

Spooner
08-04-2009, 07:54 PM
Been playing my uke and playing a little blues, I really love it, and I think it will probably become my main playing type on the uke. I like it a lot, and while i am still learning the blues I am already thinking about that sound for my next uke. Right now I have a tenor ovation uke, which is nice, but a tad bit bright. I'm looking for that deep bluesy southern drawl with some twang! I wouldn't want to go any smaller though, Probably stay at a tenor, or move up to a baritone uke(although I really dont want to have to re-learn chords in a way) for the next one. I like a big sized uke. Which one do you guys think fits the bill? I'm liking the Risa Ellie Tenor Uke for the blues sound but at about $500 US that's a bit much, I'm a poor college student! :eek: I may not be able to buy my next uke till I am out of college :( but.... what do you guys think?

I think a baritone is definitely the way to go for you.
If budget is a concern I would go with a Kala...great instrument great price.

Mahogany is definitely a bluesy look and feel: http://cgi.ebay.com/Kala-KA-BE-Mahogany-BARITONE-Ukulele-w-case-pickup_W0QQitemZ250474992358QQcmdZViewItemQQptZLH_ DefaultDomain_0?hash=item3a517912e6&_trksid=p4634.c0.m14.l1262

mwalimu
08-04-2009, 08:26 PM
I always liked my concert Flea for having a bluesy sound.

Pippin
08-04-2009, 08:45 PM
The Ohana BK-35 is solid mahogany and has great tone. IF you want a pickup, the BK-20CE is a good choice. We will be reviewing it in Ukulele Player in the next issue.

clayton56
08-04-2009, 10:26 PM
out of my ukes, the Pono Ohai is the one for blues. Nice sustain and tone. They don't make a baritone but they do make a tenor.

There are issues with the volume so I would get the electrified version.

SeanKy671
08-04-2009, 10:31 PM
This was an interesting post
Ukulele blues player hmm??
pretty cool, bro pretty cool..
I'd have to agree that a baritone would be good

And not everyone follows the rules on the whole "different chords" thing
I know a lot of people who keep it the same as a tenor tuning.

idk maybe.. that's just my input

HoldinCoffee
08-04-2009, 11:30 PM
The best blues uke around is unquestionably tHeDirTyJoHnSon's Five-O soprano (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L07NQYe7WWw):

deach
08-05-2009, 03:36 AM
The uke doesn't matter. It's the player.


....a baritone uke(although I really dont want to have to re-learn chords in a way) ....Use GCEA baritone strings

KC8AFW
08-05-2009, 05:27 AM
I agree with Deach. Blues is a style of music and can be played on anything. Having said that...I really like the sound of a reso-uke to get that Delta vibe.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BlGLJOTJO7Y

P.S. that's not me playing...just some blues on a reso-uke I found.

Kanaka916
08-05-2009, 05:38 AM
This one's been posted before . . . Jason ripping on live performance (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NPmFcF8f4Uc&feature=channel) of "Cool Me Down" . . and finally, not the uke - definetly da playa!

ichadwick
08-05-2009, 07:29 AM
Been playing my uke and playing a little blues, I really love it, and I think it will probably become my main playing type on the uke. I like it a lot, and while i am still learning the blues I am already thinking about that sound for my next uke.
Some people think blues on a ukulele is a bit of an oxymoron - a uke being by its definition bright and high toned. There are no deep bass notes and if you play re-entrant style, you lose the fourth string as a note in a run. But I've heard it done on several Youtube videos with panache, so it's do-able. I played blues a lot on my guitar, but not as much on the uke, although I still enjoy them.

There are some options. First is to plug in and use the amp to add some colour; a little hot tube sound, maybe a bit of distortion. Dirty it up a bit. Second is to remake the blues from traditional guitar style to chord forms and keys better suited for the uke. Focus on the strengths of the uke. Go for low-G tuning/wound C & G strings, and choose acoustic blues like Robert Johnson played.

Finally - if you're looking for a more mellow tone, look at the top wood. Avoid spruce and brighter tonewoods - look into mango and maybe cedar or redwood.

UKISOCIETY
08-05-2009, 07:45 AM
I agree with Deach. It's the player that makes the Blues! However I prefer playing blues on a brighter sounding instrument. My maple tenor is perfect for that imo.

But it's a personal decision. It's up to you, ultimately.

LindsayOfSaturn
08-05-2009, 08:33 AM
For all you guys that keep saying blues is in the player....I know! I definately know that it comes from your heart and your fingers. Alot of it comes from specific vibrato and string stretching. But what I am saying is that certain sounds make the blues sound better. A resonator or a baritone would help the kind of sound I would be trying to acheive with my playing. I know you gotta have the blues in you to play it!

Uncle-Taco
08-05-2009, 05:26 PM
I play little that isn't blues, and Deach is right; it ain't the uke.

But then it depends also on what you mean by "blues." Delta, Chicago, Kansas City, West Coast, Piedmont, Texas, ...bla...bla....

I usually tend to want more definition if I'm finger picking something Piedmont-ish. (Tenor with snappier strings, maybe.) I like a warmer sound if I'm playing with someone else who can sing (concert with warmer strings). Old ragtime-style blues where I'm strumming, I like a soprano a little better, yet something that will define the chords more. If I'm sitting around drinking in parties of 1 or more, bellering old blues ballads, then I don't care what the uke is or if it's really even in tune. :rolleyes:

...but that's just me and I'm full of hooey. Play the blues and you'll find your own speed!

deach
08-06-2009, 04:15 AM
....
But then it depends also on what you mean by "blues." Delta, Chicago, Kansas City, West Coast, Piedmont, Texas, ...bla...bla....
....

Good point.

Bluke
08-06-2009, 08:42 AM
The best blues uke around is unquestionably a resonator uke!

But, Deach is right. I can play blues on a cardboard box.

Ukuleleblues
08-06-2009, 10:15 AM
The uke doesn't matter. It's the player.

Use GCEA baritone strings

Yes, yes, yes Check out some Del Rey. In my opinion the baritone is not the way to go, I think a gCEA or D tuned uke sounds great.

PhilUSAFRet
02-10-2011, 04:54 AM
It's been a few years, wonder how that ovation would sound with Worth browns in low g tuning.

lozarkman
02-10-2011, 05:14 AM
I think it is not so much the uke as the player. Check out Daddystovepipe on UTube. He plays mostly a Mango tenor and wow, he gets really cool vibes. Also good teacher on his vids. Lozark