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ukekungfu
08-11-2009, 08:14 PM
Well I've been playing the uke for a year now and I'm trying to learn this song and writing a tab for it. But I can't seem to find this chord here:

A|0
E|3
C|4
G|3

Does anyone know what the name of this chord is? Thanks. =):shaka:

Dino
08-11-2009, 08:45 PM
Sorry Dude. I don't think you have a chord there. I went to this link and placed markings where you noted......no chord comes out.

http://www.sheep-entertainment.nl/ukulele/

Make sure you have Tenor-C tuning selected to the right hand side.

seeso
08-11-2009, 09:04 PM
A lot of it depends on context. What key is the song in? On first sight I would call it some flavor of Edim.

buddhuu
08-12-2009, 09:20 AM
My best stab is kind of Gmin6+9/E... with no 5th? :confused:

I can figure out other sort-of-possibles, but they're all a bit weird with more than one missing tone... no root for example.

ichadwick
08-12-2009, 09:32 AM
Sure it's not 0343? That's a G#maj7 (according to the reverse chord finder (http://4stringchords.com/)).

But 3430 - might be a D#7b9th (2323 is D7b9) or F#7b9 (since 2323 is also F7b9).

BrighamHB
08-12-2009, 09:42 AM
I would say an A7b9... you have the root, the b9 the 5 and the b7

Ukulele JJ
08-12-2009, 10:02 AM
I would say an A7b9... you have the root, the b9 the 5 and the b7

Possibly. But there's no third, which is crucial (more so than the fifth).

If I had to call it anything, I'd say it was an Edim/A, just because that's the simplest. But Seeso's right about context. Knowing the other chords would be a big help in naming it.

JJ

Mayercaster
08-12-2009, 11:42 AM
My inital thoughts where how it was just like an Ebdim moved up but leaving the A open.
So if I was gonna name it, I would also just call it a Edim/A.

ukekungfu
08-15-2009, 10:46 AM
Thank you all. I was going online a lot and trying to find that chord and it looks like the Ebdim. But the chords around it are G, D7, Am7, C7. I don't know it that changes the chords but I wrote it down as such.

Another question haha. I wanted to know what chords these are also:
A|2
E|2
C|2
G|4

A|2
E|3
C|4
G|2

A|2
E|3
C|3
G|2

Thanks for the help. :shaka:

ukekungfu
08-15-2009, 10:56 AM
And brah thanks for that site, awesome link.

buddhuu
08-15-2009, 02:44 PM
Thank you all. I was going online a lot and trying to find that chord and it looks like the Ebdim. But the chords around it are G, D7, Am7, C7. I don't know it that changes the chords but I wrote it down as such.

Another question haha. I wanted to know what chords these are also:
A|2
E|2
C|2
G|4

A|2
E|3
C|4
G|2

A|2
E|3
C|3
G|2

Thanks for the help. :shaka:

My best shots:

Bm/D

G6+9/E (no 5th)

b7#5/D#

ukekungfu
08-17-2009, 10:11 PM
Thanks brah. Hey would anyone happen to know how to do an A/C# on the uke?

Skrik
08-17-2009, 11:54 PM
C7add6?

This line is included to allow me to post the concise answer I had originally envisioned.

Ukulele JJ
08-18-2009, 02:20 AM
Thanks brah. Hey would anyone happen to know how to do an A/C# on the uke?

The regular, open-position A chord actually is an A/C#.

JJ

ukekungfu
08-18-2009, 10:03 PM
The regular, open-position A chord actually is an A/C#.

JJ

Thanks a lot brah.

Dibblet
08-19-2009, 12:52 AM
Thank you all. I was going online a lot and trying to find that chord and it looks like the Ebdim. But the chords around it are G, D7, Am7, C7. I don't know it that changes the chords but I wrote it down as such.

Another question haha. I wanted to know what chords these are also:
A|2
E|2
C|2
G|4

A|2
E|3
C|4
G|2

A|2
E|3
C|3
G|2

Thanks for the help. :shaka:

Your original chord is quite possibly a rootless C13. Can you show where it appears in the sequence with the other chords please?

The new ones are:

Bm - no need for the /D. The ukulele doesn have bass notes.

Em11 - sort of, probably, but it doesn't have a 7th. It really depends on context again. Where does it appear in sequence with the other chords?

B+7

The thing that decides the ambiguous cases is really what the bass is doing and what chords come before and after. Asking what chord a random shape is in isolation isn't all that useful. For example we all know that 0000 is a C6 or Am7 chord. Already we have 2 interpretations of the same shape, but if the bass is playing an F then it becomes a rootless Fmaj9.

It's a many to many relationship. You can ask how to play a certain chord and get lots of different yet correct answers and you can ask what chord a particular shape is and also get lots of different yet correct answers.

Your question of the A/C# is interesting. As pointed out, the standard open position A does have a C# as it's lowest note, but it most likely doesn't really matter which voicing you choose on the ukulele. The C# is a bass note and the ukulele doesn't really do bass. Playing the C# in the bass is another instrument's job really.

It is sometimes obvious that a particular bass line is implied. For example you might see D, A/C#, Bm. This would imply a descending bass line going D, C#, B. You'll never do that on a ukulele. The B is off the bottom of the instrument. If you're playing without a bass player, your best bet, in a case like that, might even be to make that line the top notes of the chord. 2225, 4654, 4222

ukekungfu
08-19-2009, 11:19 AM
Your original chord is quite possibly a rootless C13. Can you show where it appears in the sequence with the other chords please?

The new ones are:

Bm - no need for the /D. The ukulele doesn have bass notes.

Em11 - sort of, probably, but it doesn't have a 7th. It really depends on context again. Where does it appear in sequence with the other chords?

B+7

The thing that decides the ambiguous cases is really what the bass is doing and what chords come before and after. Asking what chord a random shape is in isolation isn't all that useful. For example we all know that 0000 is a C6 or Am7 chord. Already we have 2 interpretations of the same shape, but if the bass is playing an F then it becomes a rootless Fmaj9.

It's a many to many relationship. You can ask how to play a certain chord and get lots of different yet correct answers and you can ask what chord a particular shape is and also get lots of different yet correct answers.

Your question of the A/C# is interesting. As pointed out, the standard open position A does have a C# as it's lowest note, but it most likely doesn't really matter which voicing you choose on the ukulele. The C# is a bass note and the ukulele doesn't really do bass. Playing the C# in the bass is another instrument's job really.

It is sometimes obvious that a particular bass line is implied. For example you might see D, A/C#, Bm. This would imply a descending bass line going D, C#, B. You'll never do that on a ukulele. The B is off the bottom of the instrument. If you're playing without a bass player, your best bet, in a case like that, might even be to make that line the top notes of the chord. 2225, 4654, 4222

Wow, thanks for that. I feel like I just got a music lesson =) I can read music casually, because I used to play the classical stringed instruments like: Violin, Cello, and Bass. But After junior high and high school I stopped going to formal classes. Not until I picked up the guitar did I really get back into music, but we all know that self taught guitarist start out learning "the wrong way" by just learning tabs and chord progressions; not really knowing music theory, chord theory, and the like. Even in my prior years of music I never really got in depth lessons about music and it's many facets.

So the forward slash is an indicator of what bass note you play in addition to the former chord? Hm, prior to your post I led myself to believe that the forward slash indicated a specific note you had to play along with the chord. For example: In the case of A/C# I played the Amaj chord with my pinky on the 4th fret of the A string.

A|4 <-- I thought that this was the C#
E|0
C|1
G|2

After I started playing the ukulele, which I play more now than my guitar :o, I wanted to get better at music in general. Not just in playing but in understanding the in depth world of music. Because I believe that a musician should be well versed in the language. So if anyone else can point me in the right direction it would be greatly appreciated. Thank you dibblet.

Dibblet
08-19-2009, 12:31 PM
Wow, thanks for that. I feel like I just got a music lesson =)

Sorry. I didn't mean to be intimidating.



So the forward slash is an indicator of what bass note you play in addition to the former chord? ...


Yes, normally, but this notation is pretty informal so it could mean anything really. I've always thought of the '/' as being pronounced 'over'.



Hm, prior to your post I led myself to believe that the forward slash indicated a specific note you had to play along with the chord. For example: In the case of A/C# I played the Amaj chord with my pinky on the 4th fret of the A string.

A|4 <-- I thought that this was the C#
E|0
C|1 <-- This is a C# too! (dibbs)
G|2

...







After I started playing the ukulele, which I play more now than my guitar :o, I wanted to get better at music in general. Not just in playing but in understanding the in depth world of music. Because I believe that a musician should be well versed in the language. So if anyone else can point me in the right direction it would be greatly appreciated. Thank you dibblet.


I'm a keyboard and clarinet player but I too play ukulele mostly - after about 40 years of playing the first 2 and less than 3 years of uke (no guitar!). Dunno why.

seeso
08-19-2009, 06:19 PM
So the forward slash is an indicator of what bass note you play in addition to the former chord?

Yes.


So if anyone else can point me in the right direction it would be greatly appreciated. Thank you dibblet.

This site is great:

http://musictheory.net/

ukekungfu
08-19-2009, 08:29 PM
Haha no worries cuz. I wasn't intimidated at all. I was actually "enlightened" you might say. I thought what you said was very insightful and eye-opening.


I'm a keyboard and clarinet player but I too play ukulele mostly - after about 40 years of playing the first 2 and less than 3 years of uke (no guitar!). Dunno why.

The ukulele is an addicting instrument lol. It's actually made my guitar playing better. There was a point where I hit a plateau on the guitar, and when I started playing the uke I got past it. I've played the guitar 5 years now lol and the uke almost 2 years now. One of my friends from a deployment I had for the military actually got me interested in playing it.

Oh and Seeso, thanks for the site brah. I'll look into it.

buddhuu
08-20-2009, 01:28 AM
[...]

Bm - no need for the /D. The ukulele doesn have bass notes. [...]

Huh? Define "bass notes", brother. :D As you've said, it's all relative.

In notating chords, "bass" is generally taken to mean the lowest note in the chord. If the lowest note in a particular voicing is not the root/tonic/name note of the chord, then whatever note is the lowest note is indicated after the slash, and is widely referred to as the "bass" note.

On a re-entrant uke the "bass" note will generally be on the C string. On a uke tuned low G the bass note will be on the G. So, even high or low G in the tuning can affect how we'd notate a chord!

As for the ambiguity of uke chords, it'd certainly be easier to choose a best candidate to name a chord if the uke had a couple more notes to contribute to the clues. With so many missing intervals, context does indeed provide the best guide to how best to see the identity of a chord. :shaka:

Dibblet
08-20-2009, 03:47 AM
Huh? Define "bass notes", brother. :D As you've said, it's all relative.


I play the piano. Ukulele chord voicings are just about exactly the same as close right hand piano voicings so that's what I relate it to. The bottom note of right hand chords is pretty much irrelevant. The left hand deals with that stuff or, in a band, the bass deals with it. That's where I'm coming from - that's all.

buddhuu
08-20-2009, 04:49 AM
Ah, I see what you mean. :)

Yeh, on fretted string instruments we certainly don't have the advantage of a left hand holding down the bass. Piano kind of has one over on us there! :D

So, without the benefit of a keyboard or bass player, those slash chords can be pretty important for a solo uke or guitar treatment of a tune. Especially if there's some kind of significant movement in the bass line without which the nuances of the tune may suffer. Doing the best we can with bass notes is probably the closest we can get to trying to approximate what the composer had in mind - especially if the song was written on piano, or originally arranged with a very specific bass part.

I'd love to play piano but, beyond a few simple chords, my head just isn't wired for it. I can't get that particular kind of left/right hand coordination going on. Bummer. :(