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Norton
08-24-2009, 01:57 PM
Can anyone tell me what it is?
I'm going back to buy it tomorrow.
It's rather beat up, cracks down both sides and on top.
The neck is falling off too.
I loved the price tag, hahaha.

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff27/norton1927/DSC01466-Copy2.jpg

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff27/norton1927/DSC01468-Copy.jpg

itsme
08-24-2009, 02:22 PM
I'm going back to buy it tomorrow.
It's rather beat up, cracks down both sides and on top.
The neck is falling off too.

Why would you want to buy it? Frankly, it looks like a piece of junk to me. You'll spend more than it's worth to make it serviceable. Unless it's from some rare/prized maker and a real collectible (which I highly doubt), you'd be better off just investing a little more and buying a decent new or used instrument that doesn't require restoration.

gp-ak
08-24-2009, 02:29 PM
Looks like mahogany, I bet it was made in the 20s or 30s by one of the big chicago makers like Regal or Harmony.

Uncle-Taco
08-24-2009, 02:43 PM
Why would you want to buy it? Frankly, it looks like a piece of junk to me. You'll spend more than it's worth to make it serviceable. Unless it's from some rare/prized maker and a real collectible (which I highly doubt), you'd be better off just investing a little more and buying a decent new or used instrument that doesn't require restoration.

I'd buy it.
I don't care what it is; if you restore it, you know it from the ground up and that is special. Making one is a different feeling. You always wish you'd done something else. Buying a new one is nice, but you aren't part of it for years.
With a restoration, you have to screw up pretty bad to make it worse than it was. I think you're going to have fun and--just maybe--end up with a really cool uke. (Or "guitar," or what have you.)

uncle kenny
08-24-2009, 02:44 PM
Hey. It doesn't matter what it is. Superglue the cracks, Titebond the neck, string it up and have fun. You might find that you have scored a keeper.Tuning pegs on E-Bay for $15

Norton
08-24-2009, 02:51 PM
Thanks for the replies.
I would most likely make a lamp out of it and keep the case. The case is in pretty good shape.
Making weird lamps is something I do for fun.
www.myspace.com/galtlampco
Either that or use parts from it and make a cigarbox uke.
The body is pretty beat and I'm not going to spend the time or money on making it playable.

itsme
08-24-2009, 02:56 PM
I don't care what it is; if you restore it, you know it from the ground up and that is special. Making one is a different feeling. You always wish you'd done something else. Buying a new one is nice, but you aren't part of it for years.
With a restoration, you have to screw up pretty bad to make it worse than it was. I think you're going to have fun and--just maybe--end up with a really cool uke. (Or "guitar," or what have you.)
Well, if it's something he wants to make a DIY project out of, that's another matter. I'm just saying that the cost of paying a competent luthier to restore it would likely make the cost prohibitive for the end result. :cool:

Norton
08-24-2009, 03:06 PM
The other side has a big crack and hole in it.
It was made from very thin wood.
I'll get more pictures tomorrow.

sleepsinashoe
08-24-2009, 03:27 PM
Hell, I'd take the case for 20 if it's not moldy or anything

ukulele2544
08-24-2009, 04:22 PM
why are you going to buy that?

provines
08-25-2009, 06:24 AM
I'd like to see photos of the lamp....

UKISOCIETY
08-25-2009, 06:29 AM
Did you buy it?

I'm betting it'll be a great player when you get it in working order. Keep us posted on your progress!

hoosierhiver
08-25-2009, 06:33 AM
I'd buy it in a heart beat, looks like a fun project and will probably sound pretty good. I'd see if you can get it cheaper since two of the six guitar strings seem to be missing.;)

Norton
08-25-2009, 06:49 AM
I did buy it today. I go to this antique store fairly often and joked with the ladies working about it not being a guitar.
This thing is beat up! Huge crack and piece missing from the side. Cracks on the top and bottom.
I'm not so sure I want to tackle a restoration project like this.
So, cigar box? Yes or no?
I'll post pictures soon.

UKISOCIETY
08-25-2009, 07:07 AM
I would try to learn more about this uke before scrapping it. I to could be a valuable instrument. If not valuable dollar-wise, it could be a great sounding instrument. Those who know restoration will be able to advise you once some detailed photos are uploaded.

hoosierhiver
08-25-2009, 07:21 AM
Try repairing it, you can always take a rubber mallet to it and remove the neck if it doesn't work out.

Norton
08-25-2009, 07:23 AM
Some pictures.

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff27/norton1927/DSC09991.jpg

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff27/norton1927/DSC09993.jpg
Someone JB Welded the brige on at one point. It came right off with out much force.

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff27/norton1927/DSC09999.jpg

Skrik
08-25-2009, 08:03 AM
It's a shame it's dead. It looks well made, which means that regardless of the value, it would have looked nice once restored. Ah-well.

Norton
08-25-2009, 08:13 AM
Do any of you guy thing that crack could be fixed?

It has two small cracks/splits on the bottom.
The crack on the top goes from the edge of the body right up to the sound hole, about 5.5"s.

Tsani
08-25-2009, 11:03 AM
It is a difficult decision to try to fix a uke in that condition unless you are a luthier. You are probably going to spend a bunch of money. Everything except the hole can probably be glued and cleated, but it is a lot of work.

There is a uke very much like it on ebay right now - but it is in much better shape. The label in the one ebay says "High Grade, Hawaiian Ukulele, Warranted". It also has tuners that look like ivory. The bidding is at around $70 with almost 5 days to go. I am watching it, but I know it is going to climb clean out of my price range.

What I'm telling you is that it is probably a valuable uke, although it is in terrible shape. If you love old ukes, like me, then you would want to fix it. But it is a professional job or a DIY if you are really really handy and good with wood. Since the thing is split so badly, at least you have access to put some glue in the cracks. If you have a luthier that you could consult, I would get his advice.

Uncle-Taco
08-25-2009, 02:01 PM
Pffft! Duct tape, man! :cool:

Norton
08-25-2009, 04:34 PM
It is a difficult decision to try to fix a uke in that condition unless you are a luthier. You are probably going to spend a bunch of money. Everything except the hole can probably be glued and cleated, but it is a lot of work.

There is a uke very much like it on ebay right now - but it is in much better shape. The label in the one ebay says "High Grade, Hawaiian Ukulele, Warranted". It also has tuners that look like ivory. The bidding is at around $70 with almost 5 days to go. I am watching it, but I know it is going to climb clean out of my price range.

What I'm telling you is that it is probably a valuable uke, although it is in terrible shape. If you love old ukes, like me, then you would want to fix it. But it is a professional job or a DIY if you are really really handy and good with wood. Since the thing is split so badly, at least you have access to put some glue in the cracks. If you have a luthier that you could consult, I would get his advice.

Want to buy it??
Thanks for the great info.
I'll be following that auction as well.
Really I'm not interested in fixing it.
If someone on here wants to buy it let me know.
or if you even want to trade. I want a cigar box Uke that I'm not afraid to bang around a bit.
I want this thing to have a life again, one way or another.