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dakine2009
04-15-2008, 06:36 PM
does anyone know a place on oahu where i can actually learn to make an ukulele...
i'm a junior in high school and my goal in life is to make ukuleles and hopefully open up a ukulele shop in vegas...
i'll love you forever if you could help make my dream come true.
=D

Dominator
04-15-2008, 06:40 PM
Click the link for the class schedule. Mike Chock has been teaching for a long time.

http://www.hanalima.com/

Dino
04-15-2008, 07:07 PM
Whoa.....I never would of expected the class to cost $500. wow. But I guess when you are done you have something that you made, but whoa....$500. Go for it dakine. Your young. Fullfill your dreams!

dakine2009
04-15-2008, 07:42 PM
thanks guys...
now i just have to figure out a way to come up with the money before the classes are filled...
i was wondering if anyone ever took the class?
was it good?
how was the quality of the ukulele?
would you recommend it?

Howlin Hobbit
04-15-2008, 07:49 PM
Everything I've ever read from anyone who's taken the class says it's simply fabulous.

And for that $500 you get the knowledge and the high-quality materials and at the end you walk away with a tenor ukulele you built with your own hands. That's not a lot of money for some big-time mojo.

Go for it!

Dominator
04-15-2008, 07:53 PM
thanks guys...
now i just have to figure out a way to come up with the money before the classes are filled...
i was wondering if anyone ever took the class?
was it good?
how was the quality of the ukulele?
would you recommend it?

$500 is a drop in the bucket for the experience you will take part in and chances are your ukulele is going to sound great. Many of the hobbiest luthiers as well as some that have went on to start their own bussiness have taken this class. I have not taken the class personally but I am a member of the Ukulele Guild of Hawaii (UGH) and Mike Chock, the teacher, is one of the founding members. Each year the UGH has a Exhibition and Conference where all the builders get together and display their ukes and take part in workshops and concerts etc. Lot's of those people have taken the class and are building killer ukuleles as a result.

Yes, I highly recommend it.

FunkyPeaNutZ
04-15-2008, 07:59 PM
Checked that website. That's awesome. I'd love to go and take that class someday. Just to have a uke that I can call my own. I check this website out before, this lady has a lot of good info on uke and guitar building. The website is http://home.comcast.net/~kathymatsushita/.

BrianB
04-16-2008, 03:59 AM
I'm kind of intrested in building my own too, but I live in Texas and there are no shops around where I live. Does anybody know of a website or something that could help me out?

dnewton2
04-16-2008, 04:12 AM
I'm kind of intrested in building my own too, but I live in Texas and there are no shops around where I live. Does anybody know of a website or something that could help me out?

There are kits that involve various amounts of work. Some the wood is shaped all the way up to basically raw materials.

Here is one
http://www.stewmac.com/shop/Kits/Ukulele_Kits/Ukulele_Kit.html
and another
http://www.hanalimastore.com/servlet/StoreFront

Phatzo
04-16-2008, 04:18 AM
dominator, dont you build ukes? How about some pics of your babies?

seeso
04-16-2008, 04:24 AM
I'm kind of intrested in building my own too, but I live in Texas and there are no shops around where I live. Does anybody know of a website or something that could help me out?

I don't know of any websites that would offer sufficient step-by-step information on building an ukulele. I wouldn't build one just from info I gleaned off the web, though.

I'd look for a book, at least.

But here are some links I've found that were quite useful.

15 Steps to Build/Make an Ukulele (http://www.ukulelehut.com/build-make-an-ukulele/index.php)

Making a Mosaic Rosette (http://gicl.cs.drexel.edu/people/sevy/luthierie/guitarmaking_guide/rosette_making/rosette_making.html)

Making Your Own Rope Binding (http://uketalk.com/luthier-tutorials/rope-binding.htm)

UkeTalk (http://uketalk.com/) is a luthier-centric site with a helpful forum.

Tiki King Lutherie Dictionary (http://www.tikiking.com/luthierie_dictionary.html)

The workshop page at Glyph Custom Ukuleles (http://glyphukulele.com/Workshop.html) has some great photos.

To Build a Ukulele (http://mistermurray.blogspot.com/) is a blog written by a man who took the Hana Lima course. Start at the first post.

Beyond that stuff, I don't know any other good sites. Anyone got anymore?

Building my own ukuleles is something I plan to do in the future. Maybe not tomorrow or next month, or even next year, but it's definitely in my future.

I plan on taking that Hana Lima class in the next year or two. I'd love to build ukuleles for a living, or at least as a retirement endeavor.

menehunenyc
04-16-2008, 04:32 AM
Beyond that stuff, I don't know any other good sites. Anyone got anymore?


this might be a sight better suited for a noobie luthier, just to get your hands dirty. I wonder if you need less sophisticated tools to make a cigar box since there is less shaping of the wood pieces?

Hope it helps...

http://www.papasboxes.com

hotnanas
04-16-2008, 04:52 AM
Click the link for the class schedule. Mike Chock has been teaching for a long time.

http://www.hanalima.com/

Wow, looks like I need to schedule a 10 week vacation to Hawaii.

acabooe
04-16-2008, 04:55 AM
I am going to Hana Lima Ia this fall, totally stoked about it.

In the mean time, I got the Ukulele construction manual from Hana Lima, and I am currently building my first Ukulele here at home in Texas.

Once it is finished, I will post up pics so you guys can see.
I'm about half way through right now.

Aloha
Acabo'oe:cool:

BrianB
04-16-2008, 06:39 AM
Thanks guys, appriciate it.

Dominator
04-16-2008, 07:16 AM
Here's a few pics of some of the ukes I've built for friends/customers.

http://www.dominator.ukeland.com/Images/sop1.JPG
http://www.dominator.ukeland.com/Images/sop2.JPG
http://www.rockslide.org/Images/PB251815.jpg
http://www.dominator.ukeland.com/Images/tenor_6_front.JPG

BrianB
04-16-2008, 07:19 AM
Here's a few pics of some of the ukes I've built for friends/customers.

http://www.dominator.ukeland.com/Images/sop1.JPG
http://www.dominator.ukeland.com/Images/sop2.JPG
http://www.rockslide.org/Images/PB251815.jpg
http://www.dominator.ukeland.com/Images/tenor_6_front.JPG

Dang Dom, these are some VERY nice ukuleles.

seeso
04-16-2008, 07:29 AM
I am going to Hana Lima Ia this fall, totally stoked about it.

In the mean time, I got the Ukulele construction manual from Hana Lima, and I am currently building my first Ukulele here at home in Texas.

Once it is finished, I will post up pics so you guys can see.
I'm about half way through right now.

Aloha
Acabo'oe:cool:

Dang, dude. You're going to Hana Lima. I'm jealous. How about posting some pics of your uke in construction?


Here's a few pics of some of the ukes I've built for friends/customers.

Those are awesome, Dom!! Let me see if I can guess the woods:

http://www.dominator.ukeland.com/Images/sop1.JPG
Cedar top, curly maple sides and back, mahogany neck?

http://www.rockslide.org/Images/PB251815.jpg
I can't tell what those sides are made out of, but I'll guess rosewood? Spruce top, and from what little I can see of the headstock, I'll guess mahogany neck.

http://www.dominator.ukeland.com/Images/tenor_6_front.JPG
This one's koa, but is that flamed or curly?

menehunenyc
04-16-2008, 07:53 AM
http://www.rockslide.org/Images/PB251815.jpg
I can't tell what those sides are made out of, but I'll guess rosewood?

My guess is its Zebra wood sides, hehehe...


http://www.dominator.ukeland.com/Images/tenor_6_front.JPG
This one's koa, but is that flamed or curly?

My guess is flamed, looks likes its bottled fire!!!

Awesome DOM, I think you can fly.

Dominator
04-16-2008, 08:25 AM
Seeso, you are very close. The soprano is also a spruce top but the lighting is bad in that pic. The maple was sold as "tiger" maple. The tenor with the spruce top is claro walnut back and sides. The koa tenor wood was sold as grade AAAA curly koa. Didn't refer to the flame but it definately has lots of fire in it for sure. That one sounds killer too. The guy who owns it lives on Kauai and drops me a note every now and then telling me how in love he is with it. So that's a good thing.

That little soprano is a "monster". It is actually louder than my Glyph tenor. In a noisy bar situation at So Cal Uke Fest last year it was hard to hear some of the other ukes in the house but that spruce top just cut right through. I've tried to buy it back but it ain't happening.

Oh, BTW, they are all mahogany necks.

seeso
04-16-2008, 08:37 AM
Seeso, you are very close. The soprano is also a spruce top but the lighting is bad in that pic. The maple was sold as "tiger" maple. The tenor with the spruce top is claro walnut back and sides. The koa tenor wood was sold as grade AAAA curly koa. Didn't refer to the flame but it definately has lots of fire in it for sure. That one sounds killer too. The guy who owns it lives on Kauai and drops me a note every now and then telling me how in love he is with it. So that's a good thing.

That little soprano is a "monster". It is actually louder than my Glyph tenor. In a noisy bar situation at So Cal Uke Fest last year it was hard to hear some of the other ukes in the house but that spruce top just cut right through. I've tried to buy it back but it ain't happening.

Oh, BTW, they are all mahogany necks.

A spruce top on that soprano, eh? Could have sworn it was cedar. Why do you suppose it's so loud? Tiger maple. Awesome. Wikipedia says "Tiger maple" is flamed maple, so I was still wrong with my "curly" guess.

Walnut sides and back on the tenor spruce! Sweet. I couldn't tell what that was. What does walnut do to the tone? I would guess it mellows it out, yeah? It's gorgeous. I've filed away the use of walnut in my head for future use. You don't see that every day.

That koa tenor has got to be both curly and flamed. It's also gosh darned gorgeous. Really beautiful work, Dom. I bow down to your greatness.

Perhaps Aldrine and friends can organize a raiding party to "buy" back that soprano for you. They can use their ninja skills to break into the owner's home and steal - I mean - buy it back.

acabooe
04-16-2008, 08:49 AM
Dang, dude. You're going to Hana Lima. I'm jealous. How about posting some pics of your uke in construction

Ok, but I want to warn you about two things first.

First, this is the first woodworking project I have ever done.

And second, I am not done yet.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v675/mojo_wrx04/DSC08078.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v675/mojo_wrx04/DSC08173.jpg

If you are interested, the woods I used are listed below.

Soundboard and Backboard= An old skimboard that I stripped, and cut up.
Sides and inlay wood= Bass wood that I got from a craft store.
Neck, headstock, and headstock venner= oak that I got from Lowes.
Fretboard, and bridge= Black walnut that I got from cutting down a dead tree on a man's property that I know.

Well there you go, that Is where I am at now.

Aloha
Acabo'oe:cool:

CYNICALifornia
04-16-2008, 08:52 AM
This is sick!

I totally want to build my own now.

I have a basic knowlegde of woodworking and a burning desire, should be enough to construct one of the precut kits, right?

seeso
04-16-2008, 08:59 AM
Ok, but I want to warn you about two things first.

First, this is the first woodworking project I have ever done.

...

Well there you go, that Is where I am at now.

Aloha
Acabo'oe:cool:

Dude, that's great. You're using all these rustic woods! Can't wait to see it in it's final form. Those turtles are a nice touch!

When you go to Hana Lima, you'll already have built an ukulele from scratch. That's advantageous for you, you'll have your questions already.

Right on. Good luck with the build!!

acabooe
04-16-2008, 09:07 AM
Mahalo Nui Loa for the kind words Sesso.
It means alot bro.

Like I said, I will put up alot of pics, and a build summary once I am done.

So far I have been working on it when I have time for the last 8 months.
I have spent 89 hours on this project. ( I had to build alot of jigs, and tools that those at Hana Lima Ia would already have the use of, that is what is taking a while )

Anyway, let you guys know when I am done.

Acabo'oe:cool:

CYNICALifornia
04-16-2008, 10:52 AM
How rude of me, but I forgot to mention,

Acabooe, you uke looks beautiful. I really can;t wait to see the finished project.

dakine2009
04-16-2008, 10:54 AM
Wow, looks like I need to schedule a 10 week vacation to Hawaii.

there's one in the summer that's 2 weeks...
5 days a week from 9-3.
=D

dakine2009
04-16-2008, 10:58 AM
Here's a few pics of some of the ukes I've built for friends/customers.

http://www.dominator.ukeland.com/Images/sop1.JPG
http://www.dominator.ukeland.com/Images/sop2.JPG
http://www.rockslide.org/Images/PB251815.jpg
http://www.dominator.ukeland.com/Images/tenor_6_front.JPG

dominator, these ukes are amazing, especially the koa.
how long have you been making ukuleles and are there any secrets of the trade that you'd be willing to share?

Dominator
04-16-2008, 11:27 AM
Ok, but I want to warn you about two things first.

First, this is the first woodworking project I have ever done.

And second, I am not done yet.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v675/mojo_wrx04/DSC08078.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v675/mojo_wrx04/DSC08173.jpg

If you are interested, the woods I used are listed below.

Soundboard and Backboard= An old skimboard that I stripped, and cut up.
Sides and inlay wood= Bass wood that I got from a craft store.
Neck, headstock, and headstock venner= oak that I got from Lowes.
Fretboard, and bridge= Black walnut that I got from cutting down a dead tree on a man's property that I know.

Well there you go, that Is where I am at now.

Aloha
Acabo'oe:cool:

Your uke looks great. Can't wait to see it when it's complete. I sent you a PM with some a few things that may help you out.

Dominator
04-16-2008, 11:33 AM
dominator, these ukes are amazing, especially the koa.
how long have you been making ukuleles and are there any secrets of the trade that you'd be willing to share?

There are no "secrets" as far as I'm concerned. I built my first uke from a kit about 4 years ago. I have corresponded with a number of different luthiers like Dave Means of Glyph, Mike DaSilva, Pete Howlett, Kevin Crosset, William King and others who have been very generous with sharing information.

When I have time later I will put some pics together of the jigs and stuff used in building stringed instruments. As Acabo'oe mentioned, much of the time to setup for building is consumed by making many jigs and fixtures etc.

seeso
04-17-2008, 05:58 AM
Hey guys, I ran across another ukulele building kit. This one's from Stewart-MacDonald.

http://www.stewmac.com/shop/Kits/Ukulele_Kits/Ukulele_Kit.html

http://www.stewmac.com/product_images/1lg/5347/Ukulele_Kit_Detail.jpg

Steve Miklos at Carrot Creek (http://www.carrotcreek.com) detailed his process building an ukulele from this kit here (http://www.carrotcreek.com/ukulele/ukulele_draft.htm).

deach
04-17-2008, 06:13 AM
...
Steve Miklos at Carrot Creek (http://www.carrotcreek.com) detailed his process building an ukulele from this kit here (http://www.carrotcreek.com/ukulele/ukulele_draft.htm).

After reading all the things he had to do, I will never question the price of a hand-made instrument. Especially since I'm such a clutz.

Howlin Hobbit
04-17-2008, 06:19 AM
Hey guys, I ran across another ukulele building kit. This one's from Stewart-MacDonald.

The Stew-Mac kits are awesome. It's a solid wood (i.e. no plywood) kit. Apparently you can come up with a nice uke by the simple "take it out of the box and follow the instructions" method but if you tweak it a bit they turn out fabulous. And all for about $100.

John Colter (who hangs out on the Ukulele Cosmos board (http://http://www.ukulelecosmos.com/phpBB2/index.php)) has built a number of them. I think he put up some tips on the uKuKe site (http://www.ukuke.co.uk/). He's quite willing to share his knowledge.

acabooe
04-17-2008, 09:39 AM
If you wanna learn to build Ukuleles, I have the BEST source of info.
The forum at the Hana Lima Ia site.
Both Dominator and I belong to it, and I swear that it is just a huge community of builders who want to help each other grow their skills a be the best that they can b.
There are over 11,000 members, but usually only about 50 write in on a consistant basis.
If you have a question, they have the answer.
They have helped me alot.

Aloha
Acabo'oe:cool:

acabooe
04-17-2008, 09:40 AM
btw, hanalima sells kits for various skill levels on their site too.
Mike and Asa Chock are a joy to work with.
You might check it out.

seeso
04-17-2008, 11:07 AM
If you wanna learn to build Ukuleles, I have the BEST source of info.
The forum at the Hana Lima Ia site.
Both Dominator and I belong to it, and I swear that it is just a huge community of builders who want to help each other grow their skills a be the best that they can b.
There are over 11,000 members, but usually only about 50 write in on a consistant basis.
If you have a question, they have the answer.
They have helped me alot.

Aloha
Acabo'oe:cool:

Thanks for that, brother. I've just registered.

tripl3thr33
04-17-2008, 09:39 PM
i just registered too. although i might not get into building an actual uke until several years from now, but learning about it will be fun.

Kekani
04-17-2008, 10:34 PM
There are a number of online forums targeted at luthiers. MIMF, AG, OLF, et al. Even Frank Ford's site has a lot of info that is great to know. If you really want to get "frustrated", check out David Hurd's site. Bob Gleason has some info as well, as does William King (who usually blogs his builds) and Dave Means. There are many guitar builders that show you a lot on their sites (I personally appreciate Bob Taylor's Factory Fridays, as well as Kevin Ryan's "old" and "new" pics).

There are no really good books out there on building `ukulele, save for Mike Chock's book that goes hand in hand with his classes. Very well done, and you'll end up with a spec'd out Spanish heel tenor. And, for $500, you get what would be almost the equivalent of an off the rack instrument, for less money.

You can start with the "Bible" of guitar building (Cumpiano and Natelson) and toss out all of the outdated material if only to have an appreciation for some true hand craftsmanship. Cumpiano has a site with articles that have good guidance.

If you want a "tease", for a fee, KoAloha has tours, as does Kamaka if I'm not mistaken. As Dominator has already stated, the UGH is a good place to be, especially the yearly exhibition if you want to learn. They try to schedule seminars for builders and players at the same time, and usually run three classes at any given time throughout - but, you'll have to wait for November for the next one. Owen Holt and his wife just took over the Newsletter, and since the exhibition last year, I haven't gotten around to writing anything for it and continuing the series of articles on artwork.

The StewMac kit is a really cheap place to start, and is no risk because of the price, and the fact that almost everything is done for you. 10 years ago, you would've come up with far less answers to your question - this is a really good time for the `ukulele.

seeso
04-18-2008, 03:24 AM
There are a number of online forums targeted at luthiers. MIMF, AG, OLF, et al. Even Frank Ford's site has a lot of info that is great to know. If you really want to get "frustrated", check out David Hurd's site. Bob Gleason has some info as well, as does William King (who usually blogs his builds) and Dave Means. There are many guitar builders that show you a lot on their sites (I personally appreciate Bob Taylor's Factory Fridays, as well as Kevin Ryan's "old" and "new" pics).

There are no really good books out there on building `ukulele, save for Mike Chock's book that goes hand in hand with his classes. Very well done, and you'll end up with a spec'd out Spanish heel tenor. And, for $500, you get what would be almost the equivalent of an off the rack instrument, for less money.

You can start with the "Bible" of guitar building (Cumpiano and Natelson) and toss out all of the outdated material if only to have an appreciation for some true hand craftsmanship. Cumpiano has a site with articles that have good guidance.

If you want a "tease", for a fee, KoAloha has tours, as does Kamaka if I'm not mistaken. As Dominator has already stated, the UGH is a good place to be, especially the yearly exhibition if you want to learn. They try to schedule seminars for builders and players at the same time, and usually run three classes at any given time throughout - but, you'll have to wait for November for the next one. Owen Holt and his wife just took over the Newsletter, and since the exhibition last year, I haven't gotten around to writing anything for it and continuing the series of articles on artwork.

The StewMac kit is a really cheap place to start, and is no risk because of the price, and the fact that almost everything is done for you. 10 years ago, you would've come up with far less answers to your question - this is a really good time for the `ukulele.

This is all really useful information, Kekani. Thanks so much. Question, what are these acronyms?

MIMF
AG
OLF
UGH

acabooe
04-18-2008, 11:42 AM
Sesso
Ugh stands for Ukulele Guild of Hawai'i, I don't know what the rest stand for.
Also if you wanna build from kits, hanalima has a few that are already almost done, you just do a few steps, and then poof, you pau ( finished ).
I think these partially done kits are about $30.
Check it out, it is in the shop store section.

Hey Kekani,
I am moving to Hawai'i soon, I wanna join the ugh, what do I need to do to sign up? and how much does it cost?


Lets hear it for Luthiery!
I hav gotten so much joy learning and building my first Ukulele over the last 8 months, it is a wonderful feeling.

Aloha
Acabo'oe:cool:

Kekani
04-18-2008, 12:21 PM
Go to their website. You can join, even if you're not here.

If you really want to know, Music Instrument Maker's Forum, Acoustic Guitar, and Official Luthier's Forum.

By the way, Paul Okami is scheduled to teach a class at KCC this summer on building. That should be a winner as well. He asked me to guest speak, but since its on Tuesdays (or was it Thursdays), I'm busy on those nights. Of course, with an invite like that, I may have to make concessions to attend and support him.

Hope this helps.

-Aaron

hoosieruke
04-21-2008, 01:28 PM
We teach two uke building classes and plan to add another for the fall of 2008. these are held in Noblesville, Indiana...about 20 minutes from Indianapolis.

The next session is "Meat 'n Taters Ukulele Intensive" offers a soprano building session. Over 5 1/2 days students build a very nice mahogany soprano with a Spanish heel. This class is held July 6-12. We offer two other concurrent sessions in performance (with Pops Bayless (http://www.shortylong.com)) and Chord Melody (with Mark "Spanky" Gutierrez. This is our most popular class.

http://www.bluestonefolkschool.org/meat'ntatersukul.html

For more experienced builders we are developing a reso-uke workshop for October 6-11. We've not nailed down the details, but expect to very soon.

http://www.bluestonefolkschool.org/resobuilding.html

If you can swing it, I highly recommend the Hana lima 'ia class with Mike Chock. He is the master!

acabooe
04-22-2008, 03:34 AM
Yo Hoosieruke,
You're a Hana Lima Alumni, arn't you?
I saw your Hoosier Maid Identifying label in a pic on the Hana Lima Site.
Cheers.

I am going to attend Mike's class this fall, I am very excitd about it.



Also, for any of you that are interested in the progress of my first Ukulele build, I just finished the fretboard. Note: There isn't supposed to be fretwire installed on the 1st and 11th fret yet, I put scotch tape over those so I would remember to skip them for now. Those will be used to index the fretboard for gluing. Then the wire will be installed.
Here is a pic.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v675/mojo_wrx04/fretboard.jpg

Aloha
Acabo'oe:cool:

hoosieruke
04-22-2008, 07:44 AM
I completed the Hana Lima 'ia program in 2004. It was awesome!

It really set me on the way to designing and building great ukes andfor teaching the same.

Not only is Mike a great teacher, but his buddies are some of Hawaii's best players. They drop in the shop or Mike can send you to see and hear them.

Geoff

acabooe
04-22-2008, 07:57 AM
That's awesome, I can't wait.

tripl3thr33
04-22-2008, 12:24 PM
Just out of curiosity for the Hana Lima 'Ia classes, how much basic woodworking knowledge/experience would you need? I took some woodshop classes back in high school, using routers, the bandsaw, etc. but didn't really use them for intricate building.

acabooe
04-22-2008, 01:06 PM
Just out of curiosity for the Hana Lima 'Ia classes, how much basic woodworking knowledge/experience would you need? I took some woodshop classes back in high school, using routers, the bandsaw, etc. but didn't really use them for intricate building.

You need absolutely no experience.
Mike's method is perfect for anyone, becaused it teaches using simple terms that anyone can understand.
The ukulele construction manual is taken exactly from his classes, and I find it very informative.
I have no woodworking background, and I am about 1/2 way through with my first Ukulele.
Good luck
Acabo'oe:cool:

tripl3thr33
04-22-2008, 06:43 PM
You need absolutely no experience.
Mike's method is perfect for anyone, becaused it teaches using simple terms that anyone can understand.
The ukulele construction manual is taken exactly from his classes, and I find it very informative.
I have no woodworking background, and I am about 1/2 way through with my first Ukulele.
Good luck
Acabo'oe:cool:

Nice! Makes me want to just buy the manual and maybe one of they're kits haha.

acabooe
04-23-2008, 04:18 AM
One thing that I forgot to mention...

You don't need any experience, but if you get the manual ( as I did ) and a kit ( I am working form scratch ) you will also need to buy or borrow the wood working tools if you don't have them. You will also need to make ALOT of jigs and work boards if this if your first time ( don't worry, the book explains what to do ). I would really suggest a dremel, I use mine 1000 different ways on this build.
Good Luck

Acabo'oe

tripl3thr33
04-23-2008, 05:53 PM
Oh alright, thanks for the heads up :) My dad has some backyard tools that i could use (like a small bandsaw, small tablesaw, and a dremel too). I'll probably order it soon or as it gets closer to summer when I have more time.

acabooe
04-24-2008, 01:57 AM
One thing that works in your favor 333 is that you are there in Hawai'i, so you could just go into Hana Lima and buy the stuff.
You wouldn't have the shipping charges that us mainlanders would have.
Good luck.
Acabo'oe

tripl3thr33
04-24-2008, 07:42 AM
oh cool, i didn't notice that. i just saw it now. maybe once school is done and when i have more time i should be able to go and pick it up. i'll probably be looking around at the hana lima ia forums more now haha. thanks acabooe

acabooe
04-24-2008, 10:08 AM
Sounds great, the Hana Lima Ia forums is a great place full of very nice and helpful people.
If you decide to build your own Ukulele, they would be the people to answer your questions.
Good luck.

Acabo'oe:cool:

hoosieruke
04-24-2008, 10:29 AM
Here's one of our students from last year with his finished uke. He began the week with a pile of wood and hardware.

http://www.bluestonefolkschool.org/Resources/michael.jpeg

And his uke

http://www.slumco.com/Slumco/Future%20Work_files/mostly%20done%20web%20crop.jpg

He reviewed the class experience (http://www.slumco.com/Slumco/index.html) here.