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Sigmund
10-03-2009, 12:19 PM
I seem to have my UAS under control for the time being, but I'm developing a case of TAS (Tool Acquisition Syndrome). The latest object of my desire is to own a small lathe (a Midi lathe in the parlance of the wood turners). The problem is, I can't for the life of me think of a reason that I need one. I'm sure someone out there can provide me with a justification more compelling than "I thought it would be fun". I use that one on occasion, but I like to save it for when there is no other justification.

Any good, lutherie related, ideas? There has to be something better than turning my own end pins and violin pegs.

cornfedgroove
10-03-2009, 02:09 PM
http://www.cigarboxnation.com/photo/salad-bowl-carving-shot?context=user

this is a lousy example of what I was meaning...there's another build who I cant recall that makes awesome looking banjo-esque instruments. Turns the bowl himself and then adds a solid wood top. you need a lathe for that:D

you can thank me later.

I'll find the good pics, just need to ask the guys to get his name

cornfedgroove
10-03-2009, 02:18 PM
http://www.cigarboxnation.com/photo/photo/listForContributor?screenName=31enogaaegu3z&page=2

this one is neat, but not what I'm looking for yet...hold on




you can also make cool pens with a lathe:) I always wanted to do that

RevWill
10-03-2009, 02:20 PM
Because you want to go into business selling handcrafted wooden baseball bats?

cornfedgroove
10-03-2009, 02:24 PM
Because you want to go into business selling handcrafted wooden baseball bats?

oooor...

http://www.cigarboxnation.com/photo/piezoelectric-banjo

or...
http://www.cigarboxnation.com/photo/resobanjo3-1

still not what I'm looking for but I'm getting closer.

cornfedgroove
10-03-2009, 02:31 PM
here it is....

http://www.cigarboxnation.com/photo/photo/search?q=sycamore+top

by now you clearly have the idea...shorten the scale and make it a rockin uke...single central soundhole maybe, even a piezo

nic579
10-03-2009, 02:31 PM
I saw an ukulele with a turned body somewhere, and a mandolin. pg. 25 http://www.woodturner.org/sym/sym2008/TurnedForUseII.pdf

Tuner knobs

cornfedgroove
10-03-2009, 03:03 PM
that mandolin was beautiful...I'd love to make a djembe too

Sigmund
10-03-2009, 03:18 PM
Interesting. I could probably spend years just developing a technique - and make a lot of salad bowls in the process.

hoosierhiver
10-03-2009, 04:13 PM
Wooden basketballs

RonS
10-03-2009, 04:51 PM
Interesting. I could probably spend years just developing a technique - and make a lot of salad bowls in the process.

Yup :)

Slick
10-03-2009, 04:54 PM
On a PBS show today, I watched a guy make a cowboy hat on a lathe.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u68R5mEE8h0

Timbuck
10-03-2009, 09:06 PM
I have two Lathes..They get used all the time..for sanding (With a disc in the chuck)..making end blocks ..turning necks..jig making ...thats just on ukes.
They are both normally classed as metal turning lathes, but wood and plastics can be machined just as well..Just click on the pic and have a look around my photobucket. (You can get lost in there)
http://i219.photobucket.com/albums/cc143/shiregreenbod/th_uke025.jpg (http://s219.photobucket.com/albums/cc143/shiregreenbod/?action=view&current=58a9b087.pbw)

Pete Howlett
10-03-2009, 11:11 PM
Yep Ken truly is a genius and I have the tools made by him to prove it! I have a small metal working lathe that I use all the time for making custome parts especially modifying violin pegs with a nice round button using a sphere cutting tool...

Sigmund
10-04-2009, 01:52 AM
This is beginning to sound like a useful and, dare I say, necessary addition to my tool arsenal. Besides, I've wanted to have one of my own since I was in college (and that was a while ago).

I'm following the old rule of coin collecting, however. First buy the book and then buy the coin. I have a book coming from Amazon. I'll study up first and then decide on exactly what I need to meet my needs.

Thanks for all the links guys. If nothing else I got the chance to see some really artistic turnings.

nic579
10-04-2009, 02:50 AM
OOOoo and you can make a drum sander atchment for the lathe for thickness sanding.

nic579
10-04-2009, 02:59 AM
Troubling to say the least. Where is the poor dogs weight belt?http://i219.photobucket.com/albums/cc143/shiregreenbod/dog.jpg

RonS
10-04-2009, 03:02 AM
I'm following the old rule of coin collecting, however. First buy the book and then buy the coin. I have a book coming from Amazon. I'll study up first and then decide on exactly what I need to meet my needs.


IMO this is the best book for beginners on woodturning
http://astore.amazon.com/wwwwoodturner-20/images/1861081146

Also, I feel I must warn you, the lathe is the cheapest part of woodturning. It's the accessories that get expensive. :)

cornfedgroove
10-04-2009, 03:34 AM
I think a lathe would be cool just to shape whirring piece of wood with a sharp blade...I could play with that crap all day

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
10-04-2009, 08:14 AM
Sig, I ordered a small lathe a while back exclusively to make my own strap buttons and volume pot knobs. I want to use the same wood that the uke is built from. The lathe was on back order and in the time being I learned how to make knobs on my drill press at high speed. I cancelled the order and I don't miss yet another useless tool taking up space on my work bench.

Timbuck
10-04-2009, 09:07 AM
Small lathes are like small band saws "limited in use" you can make small things on a big lathe..But you can't make big things on a small lathe..same as a large bandsaw with a fine blade can do delicate work...Some of these new type mini lathes are ok ..but if you want a great small lathe then try and get one of these Drummonds like the one I use...And they don't need electricity to drive them....I got one of these on E-Bay for £160 and I love it.
http://www.lathes.co.uk/drummond/page15.html
And here's another
http://www.lathes.co.uk/drummond/page45.html

RonS
10-04-2009, 09:39 AM
you can make small things on a big lathe..But you can't make big things on a small lathe

I don't know how many times I've used those same words.

The smallest lathe that I would recommend is the Jet 1220 (http://www.amazon.com/Jet-708376-JWL-1220-12-inch-20-inch/dp/B0011TEG7C/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=hi&qid=1254684841&sr=8-1)

This is the lathe I have and it is a dream to work on PM 3520 (http://www.amazon.com/Powermatic-1352001-20x35-Inch-Digital-Readout/dp/B000BX1JPQ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=hi&qid=1254683540&sr=1-1)

Matt Clara
10-04-2009, 02:01 PM
I have two Lathes..They get used all the time..for sanding (With a disc in the chuck)..making end blocks ..turning necks..jig making ...thats just on ukes.
They are both normally classed as metal turning lathes, but wood and plastics can be machined just as well..Just click on the pic and have a look around my photobucket. (You can get lost in there)
http://i219.photobucket.com/albums/cc143/shiregreenbod/th_uke025.jpg (http://s219.photobucket.com/albums/cc143/shiregreenbod/?action=view&current=58a9b087.pbw)

While what I did see looked cool, the constantly zooming images made me nauseous.

Timbuck
10-04-2009, 09:15 PM
While what I did see looked cool, the constantly zooming images made me nauseous.
Use the freeze frame button.:D

Ahnko Honu
10-04-2009, 09:34 PM
I've been woodturning for over 12 years and love it, great therapy after a long day at work. Usually turn bowls and hollow forms but also made a few billy clubs for fishing, and several baseball bats for my sons and friends.
I still have my original lathe a inexpensive cast iron 12" x 36" Harbor Freight Company special which I fabricated welded steel lift blocks for so I could turn 20 inch bowls. Also added a foot switch for safety. I have a bunch of Milo and Koa logs that I'm debating whether to turn into bowls or save for making 'ukuleles. Definitely less waste material making 'ukuleles. Hmmm. :confused: ;)

sanktf
06-22-2010, 03:16 AM
IMO this is the best book for beginners on woodturning
http://astore.amazon.com/wwwwoodturner-20/images/1861081146


True, this is also what got me started.

Dusepo
06-22-2010, 04:52 AM
A lathe can make lute, violin or ukulele pegs!

fahrner
06-22-2010, 06:08 AM
I've seen guitar necks turned on a lathe. After the spindle is turned you split it down the middle and wallah. Two carved necks.
Aside from the actual justification, lathes are just a lot of fun. I bought the mid sized Delta a few years back and made enough sawdust or shavings to fill a silo.
Nothing so pleasing as watching the wood take shape before your eyes.

Edit; and now I see Ken also has a similar method. Think the one I saw was Larrivee guitars.

Timbuck
06-22-2010, 10:12 AM
I've seen guitar necks turned on a lathe. After the spindle is turned you split it down the middle and wallah. Two carved necks.
Aside from the actual justification, lathes are just a lot of fun. I bought the mid sized Delta a few years back and made enough sawdust or shavings to fill a silo.
Nothing so pleasing as watching the wood take shape before your eyes.

Edit; and now I see Ken also has a similar method. Think the one I saw was Larrivee guitars.
They are not split straight down the middle...A slice about 1/2" is removed (it's not a semi-circle)
You can glue a strip of waste wood in between the two neck blanks before they are turned in the lathe, and then machine it off afterwards....On U-tube, Martin Factory Tour Video's I have spotted neck blanks in various stages of manufacture in the "Martin Guitar museum" , they were obviously turned on a lathe also .. Now days they use CNC.
Here's another method I like http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d4ubNo3pS0g&feature=related
and this http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rXQfB2GdKDk&feature=related

fahrner
06-22-2010, 11:12 AM
Of course Ken, you are correct and if this thread had been about making necks I would have gone into more detail. :~):D
Enjoyed both your links but as I watched I kept thinking how easy it is to shape the neck with a spoke shave and scraper.
The bit that I still struggle with is in shaping the heel (with a Spanish heel). Am fortunate to have some good spoon and bent gouges but it just takes forever, even with files and rasps.:(
Can see where a dovetail or bolt on would be easier cause you can cut more away with a saw. OK Ken, what you got (if this was a thread about making necks)?

Timbuck
06-22-2010, 11:57 AM
If this was a thread about making necks..I would describe my method thus!..
First I take the pre-cut dovetail piece and introduce it to the next router jig... thus.
http://i219.photobucket.com/albums/cc143/shiregreenbod/PICT2990.jpg
Then I cut out the heel outer shape with this method.
http://i219.photobucket.com/albums/cc143/shiregreenbod/PICT2991.jpg
Next I take it to the Drummond Lathe and cut out the heel radius at 15mm.
http://i219.photobucket.com/albums/cc143/shiregreenbod/PICT3011.jpg
http://i219.photobucket.com/albums/cc143/shiregreenbod/PICT3013.jpg
all the rest i finish off with rasps and files and abrasive paper.I find it's best to do them in batches, while i've got the set up running well.

Timbuck
06-23-2010, 10:34 AM
I seem to have my UAS under control for the time being, but I'm developing a case of TAS (Tool Acquisition Syndrome). The latest object of my desire is to own a small lathe (a Midi lathe in the parlance of the wood turners). The problem is, I can't for the life of me think of a reason that I need one. I'm sure someone out there can provide me with a justification more compelling than "I thought it would be fun". I use that one on occasion, but I like to save it for when there is no other justification.

Any good, lutherie related, ideas? There has to be something better than turning my own end pins and violin pegs.
If you think you've got TAS then your not alone...I have just bought this on E-bay its a 12" Rotary table, very accurate, British made.. can tilt up to 90 degrees..I know for a fact that to buy a new one like this would cost me 1500-2000 UKP...So at 80 I think I've got a bargain and it's only 20 miles away from my house...it's a bit over the top for sound holes and rosette's..but I believe I can also put it to good use in making jigs, radius dishes, and such stuff.
http://i219.photobucket.com/albums/cc143/shiregreenbod/roundtable.jpg

fahrner
06-23-2010, 11:09 AM
Very nice Timbuck, especially for the price.
Only 20 miles away; does that mean you went and picked it up on your bike?

Timbuck
06-23-2010, 11:27 AM
I'm picking it up tomorrow...at one time I would have used the Pushbike...I once bought a 1969 650cc twin cylinder BSA Motorcyle..I transported it "bit by bit" to my home on the pedal bike..took about six trips..the hardest bit besides the frame (which i slung around my shoulders) was the Tank..I mounted it on the top tube (crossbar) and peddled the 18 miles bowlegged.
Happy days when you're "young fit and daft" :D

SweetWaterBlue
06-23-2010, 12:00 PM
http://www.tricycleassociation.org.uk/CommercialTricycles.html