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liverlipsyyz
10-05-2009, 03:48 AM
does anyone have any good tips on singing or know any good tutorial sites? i'd like to get up on stage at our weekly uke open mic but i'm such a bad singer i need help! thanks!

ukantor
10-05-2009, 05:41 AM
Many people lack confidence in their voice, so they sing quietly, without conviction. Sometime, when there is no-one around, try filling your lungs and producing your voice as though you really mean it. You will find that you can sustain notes for longer, and your vocal range will be wider. I don't mean you have to yell like an opera singer, but you should be aiming to be heard clearly in a fair sized room.

Most of us practise at home, in a small room, and are concerned that others will hear us, and judge us harshly. The result is like an orator who mumbles apologetically.

Your voice is a musical instrument - it works from air fed by bellows - they are your lungs.

Sorry, that's all I know about singing.

Ukantor.

Pippin
10-05-2009, 06:26 AM
Many people sing in the shower. For some reason, the natural reverb in a closed environment like that sounds "better" to them and they tend to be less worried about other people hearing them. That makes them more relaxed and without the stress, they will sound better.

So, go into the bathroom, close the door, sing your heart out and see if that helps build confidence.

If Bob Dylan can sing, anyone can sing. :D

Cali
10-06-2009, 10:22 AM
Hi,
i started with the ukulele in december 2008.
At the beginning i wanted to do instrumental solos only but
since i discovered this site i've started to sing too.

I didn't believe that it would be so easy to improve my voice with simple training. I can just recommand you the following free singing lessons:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qau_lVcIrxY&feature=channel

The guy shows some simple techniques to train your voice.
You will see how fast you'll become better (if you haven't done some special vocal training before).

Of course i'm not a Pavarotti now but at least my singing does not kill the clean ukulele sound anymore ;-)

Harold O.
10-08-2009, 02:46 PM
Another good way to practice is to record yourself. Make it all the way through the song - don't stop. Then play it back and listen for where you missed, where you hit.

If your goal is to be on stage, get some professional assistance. If you want to sound better for (mostly) your own enjoyment, keep playing and singing. Don't be too hard on yourself, but don't lie either. The recording will help.

liverlipsyyz
10-09-2009, 04:21 AM
i think my biggest problem is trying to stay in key, or even trying to start in the right key. any tips?

ukantor
10-09-2009, 05:17 AM
Starting to sing in the correct key is easy if you figure out the starting note, and remember where to play it on your fretboard. "Ping" - and off you go. It's not too difficult, it is one of only seven. Once I set off singing in the right key, I never have a problem staying there. Don't know how you would deal with a tendency to slip out of key, except just practice, perhaps.

I've been learning "The Shadow Of Your Smile". I start singing before starting to strum, so there is no lead-in to set me right. First string, second fret, "ping" - start singing. It's a great relief when you get to the word "smile", play the first chord, and it fits!

Ukantor.

Pippin
10-11-2009, 02:08 AM
i think my biggest problem is trying to stay in key, or even trying to start in the right key. any tips?

Now, you are talking about training your ear and voice control. Practice is your best friend there.

bazmaz
11-06-2009, 03:19 PM
practice, confidence... and sing from your gut - dont sing from your throat - throw the sound from your stomach (or in singing tuition parlance - your diaphragm...)

Cali
11-07-2009, 01:30 AM
Singing is God gifted, learning and practice makes it perfect, you can be a singer if you have really a soft and perfect voice and have a teacher who can understand you. it can't be done with out a perfect teacher.

I hear that very often but i know a lot of people that never received any kind of voice lessons or special training and they're singing pretty well.

It's probably the same for every art, a good trainer can help you a lot but it will also work on the autodidactic way.

If you start singing in your childhood, i think will all did this (kindergarten etc.) but the most of us stopped with 9-14 years because it was not cool anymore... all that kept on singing don't have problems now :)

Are you a voice coach homeloans ;)?

Harry R
12-24-2009, 01:47 AM
If you want to be a good singer. Just KEEP SINGING. Never stop. I promise you will get better :)

paraclete
12-24-2009, 08:04 AM
I've always been really shy about singing, but my partner kept encouraging me to keep at it. Started out harmonizing, doing backup stuff, but what I lack is vocal strength... always have. So I sing in the car along to the radio or cds when I'm driving. It also helped to sing into a microphone... a little bit of amplification helped me to hear better.

Elgyfu
12-27-2009, 05:47 AM
When I was about 11 I was told I was singing flat. It upset me very much and I never sang again after that.

I mimed the singing in school assemblies, church services, everywhere, and didn't even sing on my own at home. I was just so ashamed that people would cringe and I would feel useless - after all everyone else can sing! (or so I thought)

This summer I picked up the little ukulele that has hung on my wall for a few years now. It is a bright pink Lazy one, nothing special. I have played flute, keyboard, mandolin, numerous instruments for a many years (not well, self taught always, just play for myself) - and fancied seeing if I could get anything from it.

I found a book on ukes that I had picked up somewhere, never really looked at, tuned it up and began to follow the chord symbols above the simple songs in the book... and began to sing along.

I am still VERY self-conscious of my singing, I know my voice is horribly weak and feeble, I can barely be heard over even gentle strumming. But it is FUN!

I have now added a cheap but cute pineapple uke, a 1950's Harmony (Ebay bargain) and a gorgeous 1920's banjolele to my collection, and was thrilled to get a handsome tenor uke for Christmas.

And I sang to my parents and son on Christmas day. And they didn't laugh at me, or cringe. They joined in the choruses.

I am about as far from being an expert on singing as you can get. But I do know one thing. Practice makes it better.

*shuts up now and goes back to twanging her ukes*

(oh, but my guinea pig does still hide when he sees me pick one up, hehe)

GreyPoupon
12-29-2009, 11:59 PM
So I am also going through the journey of trying to become a competent singer. I'm one of those "when I was little I was told I can't sing and so never tried types..." And those few times I heard myself recorded it was a totally painful experience. But I am working on it as I would love to be able to sing well.

Here are a few things I have learned so far:

1) People are way too quick to blame their singing woes on poor pitch. It turns out that getting into reasonable pitch is not that hard for nearly everyone as long as they are somewhere within their voices range. I was surprised by this as I was always told I am off key an had thought this was an unsurmountable challenge.

2) Don't let your voice die out too soon - follow through. A common mistake is to start on pitch but to let your voice get too flat or muted because of a lack of air or just fear of making a poor sound.

3) Vowels are more important than consonants. I was totally emphasizing the consonants in my singing and half the time it sounded like I was talking instead of singing. I've learned to dwell much more on the vowels

4) And pretty much what everyone else has already written: relax the jaw and tongue, don't strain, sing from deep within your body, record yourself, listen and self- correct

Overall I have been very surprised at how these small simple changes can make such a big difference. I think the most important thing I now know is that the ability to sing reasonably well is within reach of anyone willing to invest a little time for study and practice.

ovation4what
01-03-2010, 05:17 PM
Many people sing in the shower. For some reason, the natural reverb in a closed environment like that sounds "better" to them and they tend to be less worried about other people hearing them. That makes them more relaxed and without the stress, they will sound better.

So, go into the bathroom, close the door, sing your heart out and see if that helps build confidence.

If Bob Dylan can sing, anyone can sing. :D
also the heat from the hot water lossens your vocal chords so they sound smother and hve wider range...not by much but if your that self concios anybit of improvment is noticable lol

augustsalbert
03-23-2010, 01:05 AM
For something of that short of duration the best thing you can do is not to worry about voice so much but worry about ear. You need to work on training your ear as much as possible to recognize key and make sure you stay in tune. Check on the net for some scales, set up a recorder to record yourself matching those scales. Keep working with it until you stay in tune. Take a deep breath into the diaphram and belt it out! Good luck..

izzypwns
05-28-2010, 09:24 PM
dont eat too much sugar food -_-

Pippin
05-29-2010, 01:46 PM
Singing "flat" is typically caused by not supporting your voice from the diaphram. When you sing properly, breathing and support are vital. You also need to relax your throat to prevent strain. You can stay within your natural range to get proficient, and eventually extend your range through training and proper technique.

Uke Gently Weeps
05-30-2010, 12:06 PM
I've been singing in choirs and small groups since I was in grade school. I found that I love singing in groups (or along with the radio) but once I'm singing solo I don't like the sound of my voice. Technically I have good fundamentals and good pitch control, just don't like the sound of my own voice while I'm singing. Since I spent so much time in groups I never developed a "sound" for my individual voice and I think it lacks soul but I'm working on it.

As far as improving your singing goes: stand to sing as much as possible, there's a reason most people don't do it sitting down. Also, find a vocalist that you enjoy and try to emulate their phrasing etc. Not so much the sound of their voice, just their style.

Imogen
06-06-2010, 05:03 PM
My best tip and the information that completely freed my voice was to sing as though you were simply talking with a sustained sound. So begin by saying a short sentence the way you normally would, then hold the 'notes' of that sentence still in a completely speech-like tone and quality. Once you've done that for a while, you'll begin to feel the difference between how your vocal chords feel when you are singing and when you do this. Then, aim to allow your vocal chords to be as relaxed as they are during your sustained speech sound while you are deliberately singing.

It seems too simple, but think of children and how they just do this naturally and have so much ability to be VERY loud (I have five of them; I know). They don't gain control necessarily, but they do have clear tones and lots and lots of volume. Keeping your voice relaxed as though you were speaking also goes very far in helping to stay on pitch.

When you want to sing, a very helpful exercise (that even horses use to relax their jaws) is to do that raspberry thing while pushing your cheeks up so that your cheek skin is as loose as possible on your face. Do scales like that for a few minutes.

If you are very serious, I recommend Singing With Success by Brett Manning. It is very easy to do, easy to follow and at least for me and a few professional musicians I recommended it to, it helped immensely. I can actually listen to the one vocalist now and enjoy his voice whereas before he was really holding his band back. Now they are signed. Previously, the label they wanted said that they'd have to ditch the singer...

Check out some of the stuff on youtube from this program- the exercies to increase range are pretty impressive.

I have always sung, but my voice was very unpredictable. Sometimes it was so tight I could hardly squeak out notes in my usually comfortable range. Other times it lacked control and/or just sounded clouded or muffled or had little richness to it. Sometimes it sounded great; it was always great when that happened to coincide with a performance! I had only just begun the program before the quality of my voice was drastically increased and has not reduced no matter what (excepting pneumonia- that wrecked it for a while). All that stuff about using your diaphragm (no offense to others who do so) is truly damaging to some voices, mine included. I get fabulous volume and control, as well as good tone without exerting my voice any more than when I speak normally to someone right across from me. I can also sing in a whisper or very loudly without straining at all, and without compromising tone and control and without exerting my daiphragm any more than is physiologically normal for speech. If I had just done what was natural to a child- to relax and sing like I speak- I wouldn't have had to unlearn so much stuff in order to sing well- the stuff that made my voice tight and unpredictable. This is obviously not the case for everyone, but if you listen carefully to popular vocalists, once you can hear the distinction between diaphragm voice and speech tone singing, you'll hear that they use speech tone, not diaphragm except for deliberate effect, which you can do too, obviously. Speech tone is also what gives those diva-style singers (not my style, to be clear) their incredible control.

Cali
06-08-2010, 08:25 AM
Thanks for this very very useful information!

Imogen
06-08-2010, 07:45 PM
:) Couldn't be happier to share it!

musicmonsterw
06-08-2010, 09:09 PM
I am actually do teach singing. I'm a music teacher and singing is one of the subjects I teach. I will say this: some people are born with naturally gifted voices and brilliant insight and never need a lesson. Others are pretty good naturally but they are weak in some areas and are not happy with how they sound: they could sound better with proper training. Then, there are others that need a lot of help. I'm being pretty general, I know but I want to keep this reply brief.

Of course, singing lessons are great, if you have the money and time to put into it. But, even without lessons, there are ways you can improve. I think it's important to try not to do too much at once. Recording yourself singing is a good idea. Listen to your voice and identify what about it appeals to you and what about it doesn't.

You said staying in key was a problem. One thing I can suggest is to sing very simple songs, like children songs, and play the melody on the uke (or another instrument). Sing along with the melody you are playing and match it carefully. Slow down the song if that helps. Be fussy, stay on pitch. Record yourself too. When you can do this well, then play only reference notes. Play the first note of a phrase and sing the whole phrase and test the last note of the phrase by playing your uke. Are you still on pitch? If not, work it again. After you can sing phrases on pitch, then start to accompany yourself with chords and sing the song, try to stay on pitch.

I've trained people who could not sing a single note on pitch to become reasonable singers. There are more intense pitch and ear training methods available but that's beyond the scope of a forum reply.

One more note, judgements about pitch can be very subjective. Many people that sound fine in the context of an amateur open mic would sound pitchy when subjected to the scrutiny of a professional studio. Be nice to yourself and set appropriate standards.

I hope this helps.

Cheers,

alexrock23
06-14-2010, 02:01 AM
Healthy and harmful foods for singers: it is not advisable for singers to consume any food that comes their way. The reason for this is that certain ingredients in food can be of harm to the voice acting just as fast as fuel would ignite inside an engine. To begin with, a singer who consumes fatty foods, chocolates or citrus foods prior to a performance is courting disaster
This is because the performer has to be light prior to any show and the foods mentioned above can be considered as heavy. In addition to this, the foods also hamper vibration by causing mucous secretion around the vocal cords. Extreme accumulation of phlegm is a consequence of the consumption of these foods and this will result in the clogging of the throat. Eventually, performers who are in this state will be forced to keep clearing their throat.

JamieFromOntario
06-14-2010, 07:32 AM
Healthy and harmful foods for singers: it is not advisable for singers to consume any food that comes their way. The reason for this is that certain ingredients in food can be of harm to the voice acting just as fast as fuel would ignite inside an engine. To begin with, a singer who consumes fatty foods, chocolates or citrus foods prior to a performance is courting disaster


Hi Alexrock23,

I agree that some types of food and drink can affect one's voice. However, I feel that this issue has been blown somewhat out of proportion; it's a little extreme to say that, if you eat chocolate/fatty foods/citrus before singing, you're courting disaster.
My experience has been that some foods will cause more phlegm to form, particularly milk and maybe oj. Phlegm, however, isn't always bad. In fact, sometimes I am more comfortable with the extra moisture/lubrication that I get from a bit of phlegm.
I guess my point is that each of us needs to learn their own voice. Different foods/drinks will help our voices when they are in different conditions.
Another example from myself: when I was taking morning voice lessons at University, I would often drink a double-double (that's Canadian parlance for coffee with two creams and two sugars) just before or even during my lesson. I found that this was a great help to my singing during my lesson. Drinking a coffee and trying to singing in the evenings for me is a non-starter and makes my singing more difficult.

My feeling is that we should each learn what foods/drinks do to our voices. But i will acknowledge that some foods tend to create phlegm for some singers.

that's my two cents,
j

musicmonsterw
06-14-2010, 08:55 AM
Hi Alexrock23,

I agree that some types of food and drink can affect one's voice. However, I feel that this issue has been blown somewhat out of proportion; it's a little extreme to say that, if you eat chocolate/fatty foods/citrus before singing, you're courting disaster.
My experience has been that some foods will cause more phlegm to form, particularly milk and maybe oj. Phlegm, however, isn't always bad. In fact, sometimes I am more comfortable with the extra moisture/lubrication that I get from a bit of phlegm.
I guess my point is that each of us needs to learn their own voice. Different foods/drinks will help our voices when they are in different conditions.
Another example from myself: when I was taking morning voice lessons at University, I would often drink a double-double (that's Canadian parlance for coffee with two creams and two sugars) just before or even during my lesson. I found that this was a great help to my singing during my lesson. Drinking a coffee and trying to singing in the evenings for me is a non-starter and makes my singing more difficult.

My feeling is that we should each learn what foods/drinks do to our voices. But i will acknowledge that some foods tend to create phlegm for some singers.

that's my two cents,
j

As I said before, I teach singing. I agree with Jamie. It's good to find out the scientific facts regarding food and phlegm formation. But, there are a lot of other factors involved. The only universal constant I can say is that to make sure you've had enough water. Being thirsty is never good for singing. Usually, I'd avoid coffee before a performance but for my morning gigs, coffee is an absolute necessity. I try to have some about an hour before I have to perform though and then have some water afterwards, oh then go pee. Anyways, it's good to take notes about what affects you and how and under what conditions.

One last thought though. Keep things in perspective. If you do occasional recreational singing, you don't have to be nearly as stringent as someone that performs regular two hour sets. For my students, I try to give them standards that are appropriate to their goals and skill levels. One good source of information is to observe singers that are just a little ahead of where you are and see what they do. But, you always have to individualize and adapt to yourself.

Cheers everyone,

Ronin.

Regster
07-14-2010, 04:51 PM
well most of the things that help were already said:
practicing
recording myself
and play the music in my head

singing is hard, even I still have a hard time, but just don't give up n have fun while doing :D

YogaJen
07-17-2010, 04:39 PM
Hi from Jen in Oz.
I was a private singing teacher for 15 years - I heard a lot of different voices in that time, & I encountered & worked with all kinds of problems that people face when they want to improve their singing voice. There is too much to tell in one post here.
As has been said - some folks are naturals & never need a lesson in their lives. Most are not. The vast majority of people can improve their voices greatly, & resolve difficulties. It depends on how much you want the outcome. An ordinary voice can become beautiful, captivating & expressive. It takes time and ... practice. It's been said here I'm sure - the voice is a Musical Instrument ... and like any musical instrument it takes time to develop the skills.
In some ways the voice is like a Wind Instrument, it works with the all-important Breath - & the passage of air through an aperture, & we use different Vowel sounds to give the shape of the sound. It is like a Stringed Instrument - it has the Vocal Cords that are like strings. It is like a Percussion Instrument in that we use the parts of the language called Consonants that do the job of the percussion. And so on!
As with any other instrument, in order to learn it we need to be come extremely familiar with it, & come to understand the various parts that feed into it - the work of the breathing muscles, the ribcage, skull, jaws, tongue, nose, cheeks, lips, palates, throat, whole body etc. The significance of posture. And the whole world of psychology that feeds into it, the nervous system, our feelings, stress, fatigue etc
So, if you haven't found a teacher, my first recommendation would be to create a Cd or a playlist of songs that you know & love, songs you are so familiar with over years, songs you relax & feel at home with. Make that A Personal Singing Practice - sing along with the CD - daily. Start more softly and gently, let your voice warm up and progressively build the volume. One way a voice improves is from regular exercise, so exercise the components of the voice. But do so ... mindfully, try to notice the contribution of the various parts of your body - jaws, tongue etc. And as the previous post said - have ... FUN :)
One last thing - I share this link - it's really lovely, but it also illustrates the point - that there is not just one way to be a fabulous singer, not just one way to move people with your voice. Watch the video and appreciate how a voice is unique to the person, and each person is unique. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_rQ5eZj5Pec&feature=player_embedded#!
Each person on this planet has a wealth of inner beauty to share - it's just a matter of gradually finding and believing in yourself and then sharing it for the enrichment of all.
Peace and Blessings to You ... Aloha :)

musicmonsterw
07-17-2010, 05:57 PM
Hi from Jen in Oz.
I was a private singing teacher for 15 years - I heard a lot of different voices in that time, & I encountered & worked with all kinds of problems that people face when they want to improve their singing voice. There is too much to tell in one post here.
As has been said - some folks are naturals & never need a lesson in their lives. Most are not. The vast majority of people can improve their voices greatly, & resolve difficulties. It depends on how much you want the outcome. An ordinary voice can become beautiful, captivating & expressive. It takes time and ... practice. It's been said here I'm sure - the voice is a Musical Instrument ... and like any musical instrument it takes time to develop the skills.
In some ways the voice is like a Wind Instrument, it works with the all-important Breath - & the passage of air through an aperture, & we use different Vowel sounds to give the shape of the sound. It is like a Stringed Instrument - it has the Vocal Cords that are like strings. It is like a Percussion Instrument in that we use the parts of the language called Consonants that do the job of the percussion. And so on!
As with any other instrument, in order to learn it we need to be come extremely familiar with it, & come to understand the various parts that feed into it - the work of the breathing muscles, the ribcage, skull, jaws, tongue, nose, cheeks, lips, palates, throat, whole body etc. The significance of posture. And the whole world of psychology that feeds into it, the nervous system, our feelings, stress, fatigue etc
So, if you haven't found a teacher, my first recommendation would be to create a Cd or a playlist of songs that you know & love, songs you are so familiar with over years, songs you relax & feel at home with. Make that A Personal Singing Practice - sing along with the CD - daily. Start more softly and gently, let your voice warm up and progressively build the volume. One way a voice improves is from regular exercise, so exercise the components of the voice. But do so ... mindfully, try to notice the contribution of the various parts of your body - jaws, tongue etc. And as the previous post said - have ... FUN :)
One last thing - I share this link - it's really lovely, but it also illustrates the point - that there is not just one way to be a fabulous singer, not just one way to move people with your voice. Watch the video and appreciate how a voice is unique to the person, and each person is unique. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_rQ5eZj5Pec&feature=player_embedded#!
Each person on this planet has a wealth of inner beauty to share - it's just a matter of gradually finding and believing in yourself and then sharing it for the enrichment of all.
Peace and Blessings to You ... Aloha :)

Very well said, Jen. As a fellow teacher, I am in complete agreement with you. It's funny but I found it surprisingly difficult to condense what I do with my students. It's much easier if the person is actually in the room with me and I can go over specific things relevant to that person. I could write an essay about singing but I don't know if that would serve the purpose here. I like your breakdown.

YogaJen
07-17-2010, 06:36 PM
Very well said, Jen. As a fellow teacher, I am in complete agreement with you. It's funny but I found it surprisingly difficult to condense what I do with my students. It's much easier if the person is actually in the room with me and I can go over specific things relevant to that person. I could write an essay about singing but I don't know if that would serve the purpose here. I like your breakdown.


Very well said, Jen. As a fellow teacher, I am in complete agreement with you. It's funny but I found it surprisingly difficult to condense what I do with my students. It's much easier if the person is actually in the room with me and I can go over specific things relevant to that person. I could write an essay about singing but I don't know if that would serve the purpose here. I like your breakdown.

You and me both could write that essay about singing - it is an incredible and complex thing really! Singing is such a joy, singing with friends is wonderful, singing harmonies - delicious :)
PS so excited ... Will and Rob taught me a few UU tips earlier. So proud, I can now use "Reply With Quote" !

YogaJen
07-17-2010, 06:38 PM
oops, reply with 2 quotes ... hahaha!
I'll get a handle on this thing eventually, I'm just a UU newbie :)

musicmonsterw
07-17-2010, 06:40 PM
oops, reply with 2 quotes ... hahaha!
I'll get a handle on this thing eventually, I'm just a UU newbie :)

Ha ha Jen. I'm sure you'll be a pro in no time!! So glad you're participating in these forums. You're enthusiasm and love for music is infectious and inspiring!!

itsme
07-17-2010, 06:53 PM
Starting to sing in the correct key is easy ...
Which brings up another point about "correct keys".

Most of us have a natural vocal range which is relatively limited. Minnie Ripperton could hit five octaves or whatever, but I sure can't. So make sure you're playing in a key that's within your limits, even if that means changing the chords around to a different key.

YogaJen
07-19-2010, 07:45 AM
Another recommendation - whether you are an established singer or not, it is wise to put practice into the vocal side of things separate to the instrumental. Make it easier on all aspects of yourself by simplifying the demands. Teach the voice the path of the song - discover the easy bits and the hard bits, figure out strategies, mark in on the page any tips, like 'BIG breath here'. In classical singing, the symbol V indicates 'breathe here' - it's handy. To put in serious vocal practice time - if that is what you are wanting to do - then it's worth sorting things out using your brain. Learning the vocal, learning the accompanying instrument, then put the two together - you will be rewarded because you have a deeper understanding of what is required from each aspect, and your body can relax rather than tense up. Hope that helps.

YogaJen
07-22-2010, 09:12 PM
Like Rome, a voice wasn't built in a day. It takes time, patience, practice. It is important to remember to ... PACE yourself. If you practice too hard, too much, or in a way that is not ideal, the instrument rebels. It's happened to me many times along the vocal road. Worst case when I was teaching too much, my voice got overuse. Took some healing, time out, de-stressing, yoga, Feldenkrais technique, etc. to restore it. Thankfully no long term damage. A life lesson :)

rpeters
08-03-2010, 03:07 PM
Agreed keep practicing. Sometimes you have to act "over confident" to gain enough courage to sing in front of people. What I do to practice, is record myself singing. I then pick out things that I don't like about my voice or performance, maybe some out of tune notes in a song, bad rhythms, poorly articulated words and practice those parts in particular. If my voice is too "nasally" then I try to sing from my chest/stomach where I belt it out a little more. If I am forcing it too much, I May try my head voice or falsetto, (a lighter sound from your head or throat). I keep recording these different "experiments" until I hear something that sounds to my liking. It is quite a process but it helps you gain confidence and does improve the sound of your voice.

jillyronald
09-15-2010, 06:45 PM
Best tips for singing tips is when you sing any song than record it. And after you just listen it. You can notice which type you sing a song in public place, try to read it back again and again, you can notice where you missed and where you hit.

cyrilruiz
06-12-2011, 10:47 PM
Many people lack confidence in their voice, so they sing quietly. According to me the best singing tips are Don't forget the lyrics, Pick a song you can sing, Listen more talk less, Focus on self improvement not competition and so on.

phil hague
06-12-2011, 11:39 PM
If you sing like me, dont do it!
I play instrumentals.

Cali
07-09-2011, 12:53 AM
If you really want to learn that what is singing actually then go to east.There you may find the families who are serving in music from the generations.You must go if you really want to know that what is singing.

And if you ever want to learn what walking really is you've gotta go west..... Sorry Adamson, but i don't get your intention.
Singing is like every other natural thing not owned or mastered by only one culture,region or clan.
If you were talking about a special singing style.... okay. But not singing in general.

Cali
09-10-2011, 01:25 AM
Talking too! It should be forbidden without a special certification ;)
The same goes with writing.

Singing is one of the most natural talents of mankind and babies have the perfect breathing technique (this is why they can scream so excellent).
The problem is that most of us do not train it anymore after the kindergarten so we become bad at it (like with sports)

basilhenriques
11-13-2011, 10:30 PM
Remember that the key you sing in when at home is NOT the key you'll find comfortable when "On Stage". Live in front of an audience it's quite different, in that environment you will need to be a half step to a whole step higher. FWIW
Also, in the recording studio standing is NOT the best position for good diaphragm control, seated or half seated on a high stool relaxes the stomach muscles and allows greater diaphragm control for dynamics, vibrato and intonation.

Tor
11-14-2011, 12:07 AM
There must certainly be techniques and training involved with singing, and not just about the range.. the other day I saw a concert with a full symphony orchestra and a few opera singers who went through some famous arias. At times the symphony orchestra played so loud that I (fairly far back in the audience) was almost reaching for my earplugs.

The singers though.. even just one of them singing alone could sing louder than the orchestra. No microphone, no amplification. I've heard opera singers in a smaller setting before (I think it's fair to say I'm not a patron of the opera so it's not been often) and been thoroughly blown away by the volume they could belt out.

-Tor

Little Plink
11-25-2011, 05:17 PM
When you're singing really high, you might think you have to belt the notes to get them out, and I still do that many times because it's fun and it gives you this kind or R&B timbre that you need to use in certain situations. In reality, you should get quieter as you go higher. Just try it. PRACTICE.

Also, if you're anything like me, your range will change throughout the day. When I wake up, I have barely one octave, but a few hours later I have almost three octaves. When I wake up, my range is F2 - G3. My full range as of now (In modal range) is G2 - Eb5, (Yes, I lose some of my low end.) but I really have to belt anything above C5. In falsetto I can go almost an octave higher than that. (C6 on a good day) Don't get discouraged because of this. It just takes a lot of time by yourself practicing because you have no social life... Oh, is that just me?