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View Full Version : Koa Fluke? go or no go



Kaneohe til the end
04-20-2008, 11:37 PM
im looking into buying a new koa fluke, any suggestions?

Dino
04-20-2008, 11:48 PM
How much is one like that? and what size uke are you looking at? Try and find something from musicguymic on ebay. He lives right in Kaneohe. I'm sure you can find a nice mahoganney uke or maybe even a Koa Pili Koko brand uke (acacia wood).....not unless you had your heart set ont he Fluke. I think that once you get started playing, you may find that you might want a better constructed instrument.

Plainsong
04-21-2008, 12:49 AM
The Flukes and Fleas are constructed fine, and I've got a koa flea on order myself. There are some improvements in the koa line besides that solid koa top. There's the tuners, the bridge and saddle, and people that have them tend to be very happy with them.

I think it's good to have a traditional solid wood uke, but it's also ok to have some fun and have soemthing that doesn't compromise on sound while being able to go outside and play. There is a place for plastics when it comes to instruments. I wouldn't have dared march with a wooden instrument. And yet, that doesn't mean I wanted it to sound crap either.

The feel of Fluke and Fleas is great, there's more to the koa update than just the koa, I say that if you're a fan of it, then go for it.

Here's a guy on youtube with Worth strings on his koa fluke: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7bqhWpdMbRQ

I hear the plastic there a little, because well it is there, but I also hear a marked improvement on my Fluke.

All-in-all, it's a fine choice, it's just that there's lots of bias against it because of the looks and materials.

tad
04-21-2008, 12:56 AM
Here's a guy on youtube with Worth strings on his koa fluke: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7bqhWpdMbRQ

I hear the plastic there a little, because well it is there, but I also hear a marked improvement on my Fluke.


Worths make EVERYTHING better...:D

Plainsong
04-21-2008, 01:13 AM
I always seem to end up preferring aquilas, and I think aquilas would sound better there, but strings are easy to change. ;)

UkuLeLesReggAe
04-21-2008, 01:17 AM
sounds pretty mad the youtube link.

I want to hear a flea with worth strings because i hear worths are pretty darn good, and i want a flea ukulele

Plainsong
04-21-2008, 01:58 AM
Next up for my Pono will be the Low G worths. I'm happier with aquilas than I was with the koolau strings. I had worths on my Koaloha and have worths on my uke-solid concert and they really hurt my fingers. I find the aquilas sound more lively, but it's all about synergy with the specific uke.

mwalimu
04-21-2008, 03:34 AM
I love fleas and flukes(I have three), but for the money you'll pay for the koa top and whatnot, I'd buy a nicer quality wooden instrument, like a Pono.

Photojosh
04-21-2008, 05:57 AM
I love fleas and flukes(I have three), but for the money you'll pay for the koa top and whatnot, I'd buy a nicer quality wooden instrument, like a Pono.

That is my take on it as well. But I also know a number of people who have bought a koa Fluke and loved it. So it really all depends on what you are looking for. They are fine sounding ukuleles, no doubt about it.

la_ingrit
04-21-2008, 06:43 AM
Next up for my Pono will be the Low G worths. I'm happier with aquilas than I was with the koolau strings. I had worths on my Koaloha and have worths on my uke-solid concert and they really hurt my fingers. I find the aquilas sound more lively, but it's all about synergy with the specific uke.

Hi....plainsong( what's your name???...i really dont like to call people with their username...sounds funny)..anyways...i just want to tell you that i'm impressed with your posts....you know a lot about ukes, strings, etc. I find your post really helpful...actually im kinda confused and i hope you can help me...i want to to buy a fluke (not a koa)...but i want a kala too...which one is better for you??? well thanks in advance!!!!!
Ingrit

Plainsong
04-21-2008, 01:16 PM
Hi....plainsong( what's your name???...i really dont like to call people with their username...sounds funny)..anyways...i just want to tell you that i'm impressed with your posts....you know a lot about ukes, strings, etc. I find your post really helpful...actually im kinda confused and i hope you can help me...i want to to buy a fluke (not a koa)...but i want a kala too...which one is better for you??? well thanks in advance!!!!!
Ingrit

My name is Kim, but I want to give a disclaimer that I am a newbie it comes to ukes. I've been playing for less than a year and am kind of "special" when it comes to string instruments. It's just that I'm not a newbie to music and I've got a degree in it 'n everything. So sometimes it's frustrating when I have the ears for a custom uke but the hands for a beginner uke. :D

But which uke is better depends on how you're going to use it, which kind of ukes you already have, and what kind of sound you're after. If you already have a solid wood uke, I see no issue with getting a Fluke. The sound is that of a proper uke, but it rings more, which is a different kind of sound and pretty cool at that. It's not a cheap sound, it's a different sound. Different but same. :) If you want a uke that's not affected by weather changes and one you're not afraid to take outside with you, and still have it sound good, the Fluke is an excellent choice.

I'd go for a Fluke over a laminate Kala, and I'd go for a solid Kala before a Fluke IF I was in the market for a traditional solid wood sound.

So it all just depends on your own needs. :)

Kaneohe til the end
04-21-2008, 08:53 PM
thanks guys, i was just wondering cuz i dont have that much money to spend on a new uke and that was in my price range

Plainsong
04-21-2008, 11:21 PM
Well it depends on what calls out to you more, but maybe for a first uke, a solid traditional one might be better. But it's all about what is calling your name more. :)

deach
04-22-2008, 12:33 AM
.... ...But it's all about what is calling your name more. :)

Seems like they are all calling my name.

la_ingrit
04-22-2008, 03:40 AM
Seems like they are all calling my name.

LOL!!!:D YEAH ME TOO...AND I DONT KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH MY AUS!!! THIS IS DANGEROUS!!!!!!!!!!

la_ingrit
04-22-2008, 03:45 AM
My name is Kim, but I want to give a disclaimer that I am a newbie it comes to ukes. I've been playing for less than a year and am kind of "special" when it comes to string instruments. It's just that I'm not a newbie to music and I've got a degree in it 'n everything. So sometimes it's frustrating when I have the ears for a custom uke but the hands for a beginner uke. :D

But which uke is better depends on how you're going to use it, which kind of ukes you already have, and what kind of sound you're after. If you already have a solid wood uke, I see no issue with getting a Fluke. The sound is that of a proper uke, but it rings more, which is a different kind of sound and pretty cool at that. It's not a cheap sound, it's a different sound. Different but same. :) If you want a uke that's not affected by weather changes and one you're not afraid to take outside with you, and still have it sound good, the Fluke is an excellent choice.

I'd go for a Fluke over a laminate Kala, and I'd go for a solid Kala before a Fluke IF I was in the market for a traditional solid wood sound.

So it all just depends on your own needs. :)

Kim...thanks a lot...now I just have to clear my mind and choose between a fluke or a kala...and my brain keep telling me (you know you want a fluke) lol..thanks for your time...i really appreciate your answer!!!!! I'm a beginner too so while I practice i keep telling myself..I CAN DO THIS!! Thanks again and see you around!!!!!!!!!!! :D

Schwartz
04-22-2008, 04:42 AM
On the fluke vs Kala thing let me try to help. Flukes are fine ukuleles BUT overpriced. They sound passable and have fine intonation, but that's where it ends. The Fluke enthusiasts will mention that the plastic is durable, but the thing isn't 100% plastic so water still warps and rots it. And it doesn't sound as nice as any wood instrument. Loud, but not particularly complex sound.

Then there's the price. For a soprano flea with a plastic fretboard you're looking at like $150. With the rosewood fretboard (which you need if you want to use wound strings) and the koa soundboard the price goes up significantly. The Flea website lists the koa flea as being $350. Compare that to this uke from Kala (http://cgi.ebay.com/KALA-KA-KTE-Koa-Tenor-Ukulele-w-pu-case-Chordbook_W0QQitemZ230242511451QQihZ013QQcategoryZ 16224QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem) which is solid koa and has electronics. Here is a video sample of the Kala. (http://youtube.com/watch?v=T0WP97zgE-E)

dnewton2
04-22-2008, 05:14 AM
Compare that to this uke from Kala (http://cgi.ebay.com/KALA-KA-KTE-Koa-Tenor-Ukulele-w-pu-case-Chordbook_W0QQitemZ230242511451QQihZ013QQcategoryZ 16224QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem) which is solid koa and has electronics. Here is a video sample of the Kala. (http://youtube.com/watch?v=T0WP97zgE-E)
Are you sure that is solid koa? I can't find any info either on ebay or the kala site saying it is solid. it does say solid mahogany neck. But not solid Koa anything. The reason I say this is Kala is known more as an affordable ukulele and use laminate alot. I am not knocking Kala i have a Kala mango tenor and love it, but i know mine is not solid and don't think the koa is either.

GX9901
04-22-2008, 05:17 AM
Then there's the price. For a soprano flea with a plastic fretboard you're looking at like $150. With the rosewood fretboard (which you need if you want to use wound strings) and the koa soundboard the price goes up significantly. The Flea website lists the koa flea as being $350. Compare that to this uke from Kala (http://cgi.ebay.com/KALA-KA-KTE-Koa-Tenor-Ukulele-w-pu-case-Chordbook_W0QQitemZ230242511451QQihZ013QQcategoryZ 16224QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem) which is solid koa and has electronics. Here is a video sample of the Kala. (http://youtube.com/watch?v=T0WP97zgE-E)

I just want to point out that the Kala is not solid koa. At the moment, there are no solid koa Kala ukes.

I do agree that Flukes/Fleas are a bit overpriced when compared with imported solid wood ukes. I guess it's worth it if you want to support U.S. made products over imports. But in and of itself, they don't stack up value-wise, especially with the rosewood fretboard option.

Ukulele_Junkie
04-22-2008, 06:19 AM
yeah the lowest to see a solid koa option on a uke would be like $500-600usd for the lowest $300usd would be the lowest for a solid mahogany option tenor wise tho, may be cheaper for concert.

But i really think flukes and fleas are very sturdy and you can like take these suckers everywhere. I'd buy one but the style doesnt really appeal to me, but if you like to travel quite a lot and u jus like to have the uke in hand and not in a gig pack go with the flea and fluke, it's like the main beach goers ukulele.

Plainsong
04-22-2008, 06:21 AM
The Kala itself isn't solid wood, not the one in question anyway. As for overpriced, there's a reason that Flukes and Fleas have a consistency in sound, and their cost to build is higher.

Well as for sound, we'll have to agree to disagree. The Kala you mention isn't solid wood either, so it suffers a similar fate if the argument is simply that the Fleas and Flukes aren't solid wood. The sound isn't better or worse, it's just different. Look at it this way - there's a reason why Ovation guitars (and ukes) are popular. The design of the back changes the characteristic of the sound. So too with Flukes and Fleas. Not everyone is going to like that difference, but there you go, it's a difference.

To my ears the difference between a conventional uke and a Fluke (not heard the Flea yet in person) is that the tone has a resonance that's kind of harpish. Yes it's a uke and sounds like a uke, but the tone rings a bit more, and is plenty loud. The sound difference alone justifies its right exist.


On the fluke vs Kala thing let me try to help. Flukes are fine ukuleles BUT overpriced. They sound passable and have fine intonation, but that's where it ends. The Fluke enthusiasts will mention that the plastic is durable, but the thing isn't 100% plastic so water still warps and rots it. And it doesn't sound as nice as any wood instrument. Loud, but not particularly complex sound.

Then there's the price. For a soprano flea with a plastic fretboard you're looking at like $150. With the rosewood fretboard (which you need if you want to use wound strings) and the koa soundboard the price goes up significantly. The Flea website lists the koa flea as being $350. Compare that to this uke from Kala (http://cgi.ebay.com/KALA-KA-KTE-Koa-Tenor-Ukulele-w-pu-case-Chordbook_W0QQitemZ230242511451QQihZ013QQcategoryZ 16224QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem) which is solid koa and has electronics. Here is a video sample of the Kala. (http://youtube.com/watch?v=T0WP97zgE-E)

Schwartz
04-22-2008, 01:39 PM
My mistake on the solid wood. It's still a beautiful instrument.

Over on Ukulelecosmos.com the Flea debate comes up often. As near as I can tell fleas are popular for two reasons: 1) They came around at a time when an affordable but quality factory uke was not really an option. Kala and Ohana weren't on the scene. 2) You can stand them on their ends.

They are consistent but with that consistency comes certain drawbacks. Flukes and Fleas are loud but the sound is not very complex. They intonate well but can be awkward to hold.

I still believe that they are a fine ukulele and I would be happy to own one for, say, $50-99. The prices they charge have less to do with quality and more to do with the number of specially made parts they have to have produced for the back and neck and fretboard.

Plainsong
04-22-2008, 01:57 PM
Yeah, uke cosmos isn't exactly my favorite site, even if I know some nice people RL who hang out there. Elitism and uke just don't mix IMO. I'm not referring to the anti-Fluke/Flea lobby, but they just get really personal really fast about silly stuff. I'm glad my registration was rejected. :D

But I agree absolutely that the cost for Magic Fluke is higher than Kala, Ohana, etc...

I'll disagree about the sound. Define complex. You can't, it's subjective, but I do find the sound complex.

Schwartz
04-22-2008, 03:36 PM
I'll disagree about the sound. Define complex. You can't, it's subjective, but I do find the sound complex.

This thread asked for opinions, hence the subjective opinion offered.

Plainsong
04-22-2008, 10:35 PM
This thread asked for opinions, hence the subjective opinion offered.

So I can't offer mine but you can offer yours? Right.

Schwartz
04-24-2008, 06:40 AM
I didn't say that. Take a deep breath now.

Vroom
04-24-2008, 06:43 AM
I didn't say that. Take a deep breath now.

Please don't be rude, plainsong was just offering her opinion. and telling her to take a deep breath is not what you do to settle a situation, it makes it worse.

Plainsong
04-24-2008, 07:11 AM
My take is that everyone here has preferences, and that's why they make different ukes. Some people here like flukes and fleas, others not so much. And that's fine of course.

But the original opinion offered by Schwartz was in the vein of what I'd read on another much much much less friendly uke forum. And it's par for the course over there. Hell they'll argue something isn't a proper uke if it has geared tuners, and that Jake isn't a proper uke player. Man I'm glad I didn't have an account there when I read that!

So it's not what Schwartz said, it's how he said it. And we all know what that means. You know how you say things when you're in the mood to say "Disagree with me, I dare you." And when it comes to ukes, I just don't get that kind of take on things, I really don't, and I don't want to see that happen here.

It's been touched on in another thread and has nothing to do with Schwartz here, but that attitude of your uke must cost this much and have these specs and be made out of this material. I hope it doesn't happen here.

But that's not to say that Schwartz or anyone else can't put their case forward, it's just how we do it is all.

Ukeguy510
04-24-2008, 02:38 PM
The main reason I bought a Flea was because of the problem I had with most mass produced ukes under 300 bucks: the variation in quality control. I tried a few Kala and Lanikai ukes of same models and each had their own nuances (ie. buzzing, inconsistent action, nut and saddle construction, etc.).

This was not so much an issue with the Fleas/Flukes since the molded polycarb/ABS plastic materials provided consistent quality. Although the Flea/Fluke is about half plastic, this is not some wussy plastic they use to make tupperware out of. This is the same plastic they use to make hard hats, car interiors, etc, etc. Its also resistant to temperature, chemicals, and most anything you want to bash it against. Lastly, I liked the customer support from the Fluke Company.

Just like previous posters, in the end, a uke is a uke. Just like a car, there are thousands to pick from but they all get you from Point A to Point B. So pick the one that satisfies you. You can never go wrong with that ;)

uumember
04-24-2008, 03:25 PM
-----


Since sound is in the ear of the beholder, it looks like you might be buying the Uke that looks and feels best to you. Listen carefully to those who say the Fluke may be hard to hold. I don't know if that makes a difference to you but I don't much like the shape. Others love it.

The Kala ukes are great. I have 3 and can't find a single problem with any of them. Traditional shape so I can use a single Uke strap. Good luck and let us know what you get, okay?


-----

Plainsong
04-24-2008, 05:29 PM
My koa Flea is at the airport waiting to go through customs. Probably a few more days yet, but that was really fast shipping from Flea Market. Grrr! I want to play with a new uke this weekend!

One ergonomic criticism beside the shape is the thickness of the neck. It actually suits my hands, and when my brother-in-law fell in love with and took my Fluke, he loved the neck as well, but it's not for everyone. The Fluke shape worked well for me. We'll see what happens with the flea, which is a modified pineapple anyway.

If anyone in euroland is looking for a deal, tenor acoustic Risa's are on sale at their website.

Plainsong
04-25-2008, 10:53 AM
Well I couldn't wait. The tracking said it was at customs, and luckily all I needed was the tracking number. To show where my priorities are, I picked up the uke BEFORE my doctor's appointment. It's obvious why I feel so crummy though, yay for bronchitis! :(

So anyway, I was taking pictures and the camera battery died, so no pics yet other than what is already online, but I've gotta say pics don't do it justice. The koa grain is lovely, and the build quality of this... Flukes and Fleas are well built, but this is like a flagship model or something. The fretboard is as smooth as I've ever seen rosewood, and the action is the lowest of ANY uke I've ever played (not many, Koaloha soprano, Risa uke-stick, tenor Fluke, and the Pono tenor). But yet, no buzz. The sound is special. It's bright and traditional, but with a darkness to the sustain. A nice combo for me.

It's just a combination of things that make this worth its price. I'd rate it very much more playable than the Koaloha soprano. Seriously. No really, it's true. I thought I'd like it, but it's something else.

The pono is darker by comparison, and the action seemingly crazy-high with the aquila strings (it doesn't have good synergy with these strings, not the Pono's fault, it'll be happier with Worths or Koolaus... I think in that order.) compared to the koa Flea. The fretboard on the Pono is rougher.

But the sound of these two is such that the one makes you appreciate the other, a nice combo I think. I know the price of the Koa Flukes and Fleas are well outside the budget arena, but that's because this uke is outside the budget arena and competes more with the koa big boys. It's that good.

But, if you don't like the shape, and if you don't like the thickness of the neck, and if you don't like plastic anywhere near it, then this won't change your mind. The sound should though.

Kaneohe til the end
04-25-2008, 11:18 AM
Well I couldn't wait. The tracking said it was at customs, and luckily all I needed was the tracking number. To show where my priorities are, I picked up the uke BEFORE my doctor's appointment. It's obvious why I feel so crummy though, yay for bronchitis! :(

So anyway, I was taking pictures and the camera battery died, so no pics yet other than what is already online, but I've gotta say pics don't do it justice. The koa grain is lovely, and the build quality of this... Flukes and Fleas are well built, but this is like a flagship model or something. The fretboard is as smooth as I've ever seen rosewood, and the action is the lowest of ANY uke I've ever played (not many, Koaloha soprano, Risa uke-stick, tenor Fluke, and the Pono tenor). But yet, no buzz. The sound is special. It's bright and traditional, but with a darkness to the sustain. A nice combo for me.

It's just a combination of things that make this worth its price. I'd rate it very much more playable than the Koaloha soprano. Seriously. No really, it's true. I thought I'd like it, but it's something else.

The pono is darker by comparison, and the action seemingly crazy-high with the aquila strings (it doesn't have good synergy with these strings, not the Pono's fault, it'll be happier with Worths or Koolaus... I think in that order.) compared to the koa Flea. The fretboard on the Pono is rougher.

But the sound of these two is such that the one makes you appreciate the other, a nice combo I think. I know the price of the Koa Flukes and Fleas are well outside the budget arena, but that's because this uke is outside the budget arena and competes more with the koa big boys. It's that good.

But, if you don't like the shape, and if you don't like the thickness of the neck, and if you don't like plastic anywhere near it, then this won't change your mind. The sound should though.

jealous already. prob going to get one after i get the money together

Plainsong
04-25-2008, 11:29 AM
Oh, here's something interesting (to me, anyway). We know about the solid koa top, the updated tuners, the updated bridge and nut, but here's one thing that's a first for me: it has a zero fret. :)

drubin
04-25-2008, 12:00 PM
Congratulations on your new arrival, Plainsong! I myself like the 0 fret idea. Enjoy your new uke! :D

UkeNinja
04-25-2008, 01:30 PM
it has a zero fret. :)
Please correct me if I'm wrong, but I think that is the case with all Flukes. The plastic fretboards are molded that way as well.
Good to see your enthousiasm over the koa Fluke, now for some pics / video :D

Plainsong
04-25-2008, 04:49 PM
Maybe I was too dumb to notice that with the tenor surf Fluke. I'm still a uke newb now but was more of one then. I don't know why I think zero frets are cool, but they are.

It's tough adjusting to tuning with the friction tuners after being spoiled by the geared tuners. Argh! A tiny twist and it's sharp! Go back, go back... not that far back! ;)

I'm still very camera-shy about my playing though. A nice song to compare the ukes with is my simplified version of What a Wonderful World.

Ukeguy510
04-25-2008, 05:03 PM
It's tough adjusting to tuning with the friction tuners after being spoiled by the geared tuners. Argh! A tiny twist and it's sharp! Go back, go back... not that far back! ;)

Once the strings settle you shouldn't have to touch the tuners. My Worth clears took about a week to settle in. I haven't had to mess with them ever since ;)

Plainsong
04-25-2008, 05:19 PM
Once the strings settle you shouldn't have to touch the tuners. My Worth clears took about a week to settle in. I haven't had to mess with them ever since ;)

I know, and Aquilas stretch insanely anyway. It's part of the fun when trying out a new uke. "That sounds nice, sounds nice, sounds... ok that's the key of q-flat." :)

drubin
04-25-2008, 05:46 PM
I think a lot depends upon the environment you live in, how much you play, the particular instrument in question, and what qualifies as "in tune" sounding to your ear. If there's a big increase or decrease in humidity or temperature, it can have a significant effect on tuning, even if your strings are already settled in. Also, if you do a lot of note bending (as I sometimes do), it will affect the uke's tuning. I retune no matter what whenever I pull my uke out of its case, using both a tuner and my ear. Tuning by ear is important not only because electronic tuning machines are rarely 100% accurate, but also because tuning by ear helps one to learn the relationships between the basic notes of the tuning in a more organic way. Just my 2 cents. :p

Plainsong
04-25-2008, 05:52 PM
Yeah the ear training part of music theory in college is a bitch. :) If I don't use a tuner, I tend to want hear everything a tad sharp, but at least in tune with itself. The strings are still very much in the stretchy phase, so it's a few days yet to "more or less always in tune." In this environment there isn't a lot of change one way or the other until they settle down.

Woodstocksp3
04-25-2008, 09:52 PM
Yeah the ear training part of music theory in college is a bitch. :) If I don't use a tuner, I tend to want hear everything a tad sharp, but at least in tune with itself. The strings are still very much in the stretchy phase, so it's a few days yet to "more or less always in tune." In this environment there isn't a lot of change one way or the other until they settle down.

Same here, I naturally prefer things as sharp or something because everytime I tune my trumpet by ear I am slightly sharp.

rainbowprof
04-28-2009, 04:52 AM
jealous already. prob going to get one after i get the money together

I'm really keen on the koa fluke myself. ;) I have a pono tenor 8 string koa which sounds rather harp-like itself, in my opinion. And a solid sitka top concert uke. My teenage sons play that one. But I think the fluke would round out the set. The soprano kala I have really for my youngest kids. It's hard to get my fingers around it. Plainsong, are you pleased with your koa fluke? I rarely hear people complain about Ovations, why the fuss about flukes, eh?
I wouldn't purchase it because it's cheap and plastic. The price range means one'll probably look after it fairly well. It's not only the back that's likely to get knocked, anyway... The price of an instrument doesn't dictate how I look after it. I encourage my kids to look after all instruments. Even plastic recorders are very viable instruments. In fact I have a special Japanese made plastic recorder into which I had a wooden fipple inserted that sounds better than many other instruments of solid wood that cost much more- as asserted by many well-respected baroque musicians. And even compared to another German-made baroque treble recorder valued at 8 times its price that I also own, it still holds its own. There's actually a special company in the US that do this succesfully as the main stay of their business.
In the end, music is music. The rhythm and feeling are what truly shape it.
Who else has a koa fluke that they can report on? Tell us your opinions and level of satisfaction. :anyone:

deach
04-28-2009, 04:56 AM
....Who else has a koa fluke that they can report on? Tell us your opinions and level of satisfaction. :anyone:

Adelle's boyfriend has a tenor koa Fluke. I've played it and it sounds and feels great. They seem to like it very much too.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ACvZkuTrctk




.

Ahnko Honu
04-28-2009, 07:11 AM
For some mysterious reason i'm REALLY drawn to the Koa Flea with concert neck.

haole
04-28-2009, 07:14 AM
For some mysterious reason i'm REALLY drawn to the Koa Flea with concert neck.

Why? It doesn't look anything like a pineapple. :confused:

Oswegan
04-28-2009, 07:23 AM
Next up for my Pono will be the Low G worths. I'm happier with aquilas than I was with the koolau strings. I had worths on my Koaloha and have worths on my uke-solid concert and they really hurt my fingers. I find the aquilas sound more lively, but it's all about synergy with the specific uke.

I love my Pono with Worth low G (CT). It's like butta.

Kaneohe til the end
04-28-2009, 10:30 PM
wow, this is an old thread. i bought my koaloha and havent looked back