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thatguywiththeukulele
10-19-2009, 11:47 AM
Hello all! im new to the ukulele. in fact i just got it today. what are the diffrent strumming techniques and what is the best for beginners

jinny
10-19-2009, 12:06 PM
hah... you might be opening a can of worms for yourself.

I see a world of strumming in your future.

I would check out the video tutorial just as start... Aldrine does a great job of teaching strums... just start with the earliest vids. I think some are sectioned off as beginner tutorials too.

...and maybe try strumming that UU search function for more info when you need it.

Just remember to have fun!

Uncle Rod Higuchi
10-19-2009, 12:15 PM
Hi there, Uncle Rod here, here's a link to a free gift for you in the form of a beginner's instruction booklet.

In my mind strumming is the LAST thing to be concerned with. First work on forming chords by name, then work on changing from chord to chord until you can do so smoothly, in time with the rhythm of a simple melody (Twinkle Little Star), without interrupting your strumming to look at your chord-forming fingers.

Anyway, here it is:

http://www.4shared.com/file/123858410/4f4615dc/Free_Songbook_Master.html

When you can play a simple melody without interrupting yourself or without looking at your hands, you will be ready to work on strumming... in my opinion. If you concern yourself with strumming before that, I believe you will be frustrating your efforts at learning to play a song.

Hey, we're all on your side here at UU. Others will chime in with their helpful suggestions. Welcome to the community.

Keep uke-in',

existence
10-19-2009, 02:59 PM
:agree: Good advice there. I think lots of folks expect to be able to do too much right off the bat. There is a learning curve during which you're just going to be getting the basic techniques down....holding a chord, switching to another chord, etc. It'll be a short while before you're actually playing tunes....the more you practice, the quicker you'll get there (obviously!)

I'd say start with C, F, and G7 (the Holy Trinity of Uke chords.) Concentrate on playing each note of each chord cleanly (that means the notes sounds clearly, without any buzzing or "thud" sound.) Then switch to the next, taking as long as you need to position your fingers, and sound each note cleanly. I won't lie, it's gonna be a little weird at first, as your hand won't want to make those shapes. But give it a little time and you'll be making those chords, and switching between them, like second nature. Once that happens, you'll be strumming all sorts of cool sounding tunes!

Good luck, and welcome to the Wide World of Ukulele!

brickerenator
10-19-2009, 03:03 PM
:agree: Good advice there. I think lots of folks expect to be able to do too much right off the bat. There is a learning curve during which you're just going to be getting the basic techniques down....holding a chord, switching to another chord, etc. It'll be a short while before you're actually playing tunes....the more you practice, the quicker you'll get there (obviously!)

I'd say start with C, F, and G7 (the Holy Trinity of Uke chords.) Concentrate on playing each note of each chord cleanly (that means the notes sounds clearly, without any buzzing or "thud" sound.) Then switch to the next, taking as long as you need to position your fingers, and sound each note cleanly. I won't lie, it's gonna be a little weird at first, as your hand won't want to make those shapes. But give it a little time and you'll be making those chords, and switching between them, like second nature. Once that happens, you'll be strumming all sorts of cool sounding tunes!

Good luck, and welcome to the Wide World of Ukulele!

^^^^^^
In my experience C is the easiest chord, followed by F.

I'll just play variations of the C, F, and G7 pattern for 10-15 minutes at a time. And you know what? Anytime I run into those chords in a song I don't even have to think about them anymore, they just come naturally. Trust me, it's a weird feeling.

existence
10-19-2009, 03:12 PM
^^^^^^
In my experience C is the easiest chord, followed by F.

I'll just play variations of the C, F, and G7 pattern for 10-15 minutes at a time. And you know what? Anytime I run into those chords in a song I don't even have to think about them anymore, they just come naturally. Trust me, it's a weird feeling.

Exactly! It's a great feeling yeah? Not having to think about where to put your fingers lets you concentrate on playing expressively, which is what it's all about.


But to the OP: don't worry about any of that yet. You're gonna get those basic shapes down, then you'll be off and flying!

Waterguy
10-19-2009, 03:27 PM
Imagine your hand is a metronome. It moves up and down in a precise time interval. While your hand is doing this, it hits all the uke strings in exactly this way, down, down, up up, down, up. Those strums happened during one single 4 count. During each single count, your hand was moving down once and up once. On any given up or down motion you could have hit the strings of your uke or missed the strings of your uke, but because you are reading this you actualy did (down, miss, down, up, miss, up, down, up).

My teacher calls that island strum. I'm guessing it has many names but it is one of the easier strums to pick up.

There are at the least, hundreds of strum posibilities, maby thousands. Once you start adding different rhythms, chunks, single string picks as part of the strum, the variations get kind of endless. Island is a pretty good place to start. Lots of songs sound good with that strum. I'd recommend it as a good starting point.

The uke is kind of like the game of Othello in some respects. Show someone 3 chords and 1 strum, and they will sound decent. Mastering the instrument is a whole different story.

Have fun on your journey, I certainly am:)

thatguywiththeukulele
10-19-2009, 03:51 PM
I got some strumming ideas. I use my index finger up instead of going up I go down is that ok?