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UkuLeLesReggAe
10-31-2009, 04:55 PM
Went to hospital last night, and seems that I have anxiety, causing heart pulpitations... Kind of worried me when I went into hospital, but I can't do much. So after 2 blood tests, 2 heart scans and xrays, that was the conclusion. Anybody else suffer anxiety?

Uncle-Taco
10-31-2009, 05:01 PM
Yep. I test off-the-scale on that and have been treated for it in about every way there is. I envy mellow, laid-back people.

My wife does not, but had the heart palpitations recently and went to the hospital, too. Turns out it was probably the allergy medicine she was taking.

Good luck. Recognizing it is a big chunk of learning to function better.

UkuLeLesReggAe
10-31-2009, 05:06 PM
Recognizing it is a big chunk of learning to function better.

whats that mean? The heart pulpitations and anxiety only come at night though, but last night was just extremely bad.

CountryMouse
10-31-2009, 05:15 PM
Went to hospital last night, and seems that I have anxiety, causing heart pulpitations... Kind of worried me when I went into hospital, but I can't do much. So after 2 blood tests, 2 heart scans and xrays, that was the conclusion. Anybody else suffer anxiety?

I have for years and years. I've been on medication for it for a long time; but you also have to learn coping mechanisms too, because medicine can't do everything for you. Also, if you can, cut out caffeine altogether (chocolate contains caffeine too, BTW) and nicotine too--they are both "uppers" and can make you jittery.

I still get short-lived palpitations; but my sister, who used to be a nurse, said to cough--it massages the heart. This usually works for me almost instantaneously.

What has the doctor recommended for you?

CountryMouse

UkuLeLesReggAe
10-31-2009, 05:25 PM
Also, if you can, cut out caffeine altogether (chocolate contains caffeine too, BTW) and nicotine too--they are both "uppers" and can make you jittery.

i had 4 coffee hits yesterday, maybe thats why it happened. as for nicotine, i dont smoke... if thats what u mean.

my doctor recommended to see my GP, and told me I need help because I don't tell anyone anything ( I have low trust in people) and I need to talk to someone... So tomorrow, I'm going to see my gp.

And as for heart pulpitations, yep, they only last for seconds, 1-2 even. And doesn't occur often.

.... I love coffee!! :(

CountryMouse
10-31-2009, 06:14 PM
i had 4 coffee hits yesterday, maybe thats why it happened. as for nicotine, i dont smoke... if thats what u mean.

my doctor recommended to see my GP, and told me I need help because I don't tell anyone anything ( I have low trust in people) and I need to talk to someone... So tomorrow, I'm going to see my gp.

And as for heart pulpitations, yep, they only last for seconds, 1-2 even. And doesn't occur often.

.... I love coffee!! :(

There's always decaf. :) I love chocolate...SO MUCH! But I can't have it for TWO reasons: the caffeine and also it aggravates acid reflux, which I also have a problem with. :-/

Yes, nicotine is in cigarettes. I tried them for a short while a long time ago, and they made me terribly jittery. I couldn't understand how people said smoking relaxed them when it had a very bad effect on me. So obviously I quit.

I'm glad you're going to be seeing someone. Everyone needs someone to talk to.

Also: do you keep a journal (paper or online)? Online you could have a LiveJournal (or similar), set it to Friends Only, then have NO FRIENDS. In other words, only you would see what you write. Or have your entries set totally to PRIVATE.

Or you could buy a nice fountain pen (if you don't want to pay much but want a nice writer, get a Lamy Safari or Lamy AL-Star) and journal and keep it in a lock-box. There you can say all the scary/scared/angry/everything thoughts that you would never want anyone else to see. I have one of those, the one no one sees, somewhere else. I don't even talk about where it is. :p

That's enough for now. I'm sure whoever you will be seeing will have other helpful ideas for you. :)

CountryMouse

UkuLeLesReggAe
10-31-2009, 06:29 PM
thanks a lot of that!! yeh i dont see the "relief" from cigarettes. they make me sick, and it makes my anxiety occur (hard to breathe and heavy chest).

I have to ask, is anxiety like autism ( not the type of sickness, autism - once you have it, it stays... ) but can you make it so you don't get it? like heal anxiety? I mean, up until the other day (apart from me going to sleep at 1-2in the morning) I didn't have a problem with it, it just flew over my head... It didn't affect my heart as bad as it did yesterday. maybe it sgetting worse and worse..

UkuLeLesReggAe
10-31-2009, 07:01 PM
will alcohol affect anxiety? should i cut down?

seeso
10-31-2009, 07:17 PM
will alcohol affect anxiety? should i cut down?

You should ask your doctor about that, bro.

UkuLeLesReggAe
10-31-2009, 07:42 PM
You should ask your doctor about that, bro.

alright, I have several questions for him tomorrow.

CountryMouse
10-31-2009, 08:31 PM
thanks a lot of that!! yeh i dont see the "relief" from cigarettes. they make me sick, and it makes my anxiety occur (hard to breathe and heavy chest).

I have to ask, is anxiety like autism ( not the type of sickness, autism - once you have it, it stays... ) but can you make it so you don't get it? like heal anxiety? I mean, up until the other day (apart from me going to sleep at 1-2in the morning) I didn't have a problem with it, it just flew over my head... It didn't affect my heart as bad as it did yesterday. maybe it sgetting worse and worse..

You should ask your doctor that because you may well not have what I do: I have panic disorder. The tendency for panic disorder is a genetic trait--my sis and I both got that from our dad. So we are stuck with that the rest of our lives, to one degree or another. With panic disorder, there is no cure, no matter what some say. You just learn to live with it and manage it.

But your anxiety may be a temporary thing and nothing like what I have. So be sure to ask your doctor about that.

One thing I'll bet your doctor will say, no matter what kind of anxiety you have, is that learning relaxation techniques would be very good for you, such as meditation or any of those sorts of things. They are good for anyone!

Please don't worry about this, because it's all manageable. I know this sounds impossible, but it's important, when you're feeling anxious, to do whatever works to make you relax. Those are the coping techniques/mechanisms I mentioned before. The things that will help you chill when you don't think you can. It comes with practice.

Also, the doctor you are going to see might have you take some medication temporarily. Don't worry about that. If you are concerned about taking medications, be sure to bring that up. In fact, ask questions about anything that concerns you regarding your situation. It's good to be armed with facts.

Take care--things will get better. :)

CountryMouse, who is signing off for the night and who is VERY GLAD to be back on Standard Time/Railroad Time!!

khrome
10-31-2009, 08:57 PM
I developed anxiety after back surgery in '02 and it hasn't gone since then. the doc said the initial cause was because they had to cut through a lot of nerves and it wreaked havoc with my sympathetic nervous system (nervous system of your extremeties - as oppose to the central nervous system.) He put me on Paxill (anti-anxiety) and Ambian (sleep aid) but I didn't like the crappy feeling I got from the pills so I got off of them. Since then, I've recouped from the surgery but I still get fits of anxiety which result in shortness of breath and insomnia. It usually happens if I'm stressed out about work. I haven't figured out a solution but taking deep breaths helps to calm me down, and I try to avoid stressful situations. Like if I know I'll be taking a plane, I plan my checklist and pack in advance, and give myself a lot of time to get to the airport. Proper diet and exercise also helps, as well as meditative exercises like tai chi. My friend has had a lot of success eleviating stress with yoga. I mention diet and exercise because if your body doesn't have enough nutrients, that also causes stress but it's harder for you to notice - it's physical stress as oppose to mental.

It's good that you found the root of your problem - internalizing all your problems, which in turn causes stress. I agree with countrymouse that having a journal helps, or even talking to a therapist. There is no shame in this - my boss sees one every week, and ever since she started she has been so much healthier.

UkuLeLesReggAe
10-31-2009, 09:32 PM
^ yeah well, in australia... you get a few therapy sessions through medicare (which is our free medical service) so I'll see how that goes... Because yeah I get insomnia also, it sucks.

hopefully my anxiety is temporary, because I never used to have it (I don't think) and I'm pretty sure I don't have panic disorder... I only get like this when I start thinking about my family (god knows why, but i think about them every night). but thanks for everybodys input! has put my mind at ease for the night... until I see my gp tomorrow, and i'll let use know. :D :D +1

hoosierhiver
11-01-2009, 03:21 AM
I worked as a psychiatric RN for about 20 years. I suggest you research ANXIETY DISORDERS online, I'm sure there are helpful sites and forums. The typical gp won't know alot about these problems and will likely only refer you to a psychiatrist. The more you research this, the better. Unless you are in a constant panic state, Be very careful not to let a doctor prescibe you routine valiums or xanax as these are addictive and only treat immediate symptoms. Learning coping mechanisms is the most important thing. Talking to people is essential and makes you feel better. As mentioned above look closely at your caffeine and dietary intake.

Everyone has anxiety. One thing that sounds very simple, but is very effective and can be done anywhere at any time is, Focus on your breathing, try to concentrate on breathing in and breathing out slowly. Don't think of anything else, just breath.

UkuLeLesReggAe
11-01-2009, 08:47 PM
well im not going into medication, and i have been researching a lot. I dunno, hopefully it is temporary... But I have had a constant pain for the past 2 days in my chest, ahhh :P

dominicfoundthemooon
11-01-2009, 11:49 PM
Hey

I saw your post and I just had to respond. I deal with this everyday... Yup.. Even when you see my goofy videos... It is with me. I have been dealing with it since 2001.

First off... Know you are not crazy... You are not alone... Those two facts a lone made me feel better from the start. Also do SEE A DOCTOR! Some say research the web... But for me that did not help... It just made things worse... So I STOPPED and stuck with what my Dr. told me. We are all unique people.. and out minds work in all kinds of ways. This was the plan I followed.. But it only worked for me..

1. Dr. visit each week (off and on for the last 10 years)
2. Running (or other activity)
3. Meditation CBT
4. NO CAFFEINE.. NONE
5. Funny Movies or TV to calm myself
6. Medication

So know you are not alone... you are not going to go CRAZY... The attacks will PASS... and get into a DR ASAP and come up with a plan of attack.. and then do your best to live your life...

If you want to talk more about this with me.. e-mail me at dominicaltieri@gmail.com

one of the biggest reasons I talk about this in the open is I feel we need to GET RID of the stigma that goes along with this issue.. That is 1/2 of the reason i was anxious.. (are people going to think i am crazy? am i going to freak out and everyone will look at me? will people talk behind my back?)

I tell anyone who asks me about it.. and you know.. more often than not.. THEY CAN RELATE to it.. a many more people have it than let on... and when you share.. you open a door...

I hope you get help soon.. and like I said e-mail me any time.

Thanks

be well..

d

UkuLeLesReggAe
11-02-2009, 01:00 AM
ok no worries thanks a lot for that. :P

Blrfl
11-02-2009, 03:13 AM
If you can, get your doctor to run a thyroid panel. Too much thyroid hormone in your system can produce anxiety and a whole raft of other unpleasant symptoms.

--Mark

hoosierhiver
11-02-2009, 03:32 AM
If you can, get your doctor to run a thyroid panel. Too much thyroid hormone in your system can produce anxiety and a whole raft of other unpleasant symptoms.

--Mark

Good point Mark, that can certainly cause arrythmias as can caffeine.

CountryMouse
11-02-2009, 06:39 AM
Hey

I saw your post and I just had to respond. I deal with this everyday... Yup.. Even when you see my goofy videos... It is with me. I have been dealing with it since 2001.

First off... Know you are not crazy... You are not alone... Those two facts a lone made me feel better from the start. Also do SEE A DOCTOR! Some say research the web... But for me that did not help... It just made things worse... So I STOPPED and stuck with what my Dr. told me. We are all unique people.. and out minds work in all kinds of ways. This was the plan I followed.. But it only worked for me..

1. Dr. visit each week (off and on for the last 10 years)
2. Running (or other activity)
3. Meditation CBT
4. NO CAFFEINE.. NONE
5. Funny Movies or TV to calm myself
6. Medication

So know you are not alone... you are not going to go CRAZY... The attacks will PASS... and get into a DR ASAP and come up with a plan of attack.. and then do your best to live your life...

If you want to talk more about this with me.. e-mail me at dominicaltieri@gmail.com

one of the biggest reasons I talk about this in the open is I feel we need to GET RID of the stigma that goes along with this issue.. That is 1/2 of the reason i was anxious.. (are people going to think i am crazy? am i going to freak out and everyone will look at me? will people talk behind my back?)

I tell anyone who asks me about it.. and you know.. more often than not.. THEY CAN RELATE to it.. a many more people have it than let on... and when you share.. you open a door...

I hope you get help soon.. and like I said e-mail me any time.

Thanks

be well..

d

Dominic, you rock! :) You laid it out in easy-to-understand terms. I kinda rambled. :p

Just to reiterate what Dominic said: each of us is different, so what works for one might not work for another. I mostly don't think about it if I don't have to. I HATE doing research on the Web or reading about it. It just makes me dwell on it. That's also how I dealt with the breast cancer thing: make a plan, then forget about it until it's time to deal with it. But that's just me.

And like Dominic said, after you come with a plan of attack (and this can and probably will be tinkered with over time), do it and then get on with your life. Sounds easier said than done at first, but it will become easier. Don't worry. We're here for you, and you'll be fine--really! :)

CountryMouse

Thumper
11-02-2009, 06:50 AM
Sorry to hear you're having this problem - best of luck to you.

I have to say, I found this remark interesting:



my doctor recommended to see my GP, and told me I need help because I don't tell anyone anything ( I have low trust in people) and I need to talk to someone...

To me that was a surprising observation, because you historically seem very comfortable sharing some pretty intimate stuff about yourself in this forum, which currently is made up of nearly 14,000 members, the vast majority of whom must be complete strangers to you. Yet you're apparently uncomfortable sharing your feelings with the real live human beings you have more direct access to. Perhaps the anonymity of online communication makes you feel safer?

It might be interesting to discuss this unusual split set of comfort levels with a doctor or therapist. I've definitely seen people who show a markedly different personality online than they do in person, but who aren't aware of the difference, even though it's obvious to people who know them well. I wonder if that's happening to you as well?

Anyway, good luck, and hang in there.

sukie
11-02-2009, 07:47 AM
If you can, get your doctor to run a thyroid panel. Too much thyroid hormone in your system can produce anxiety and a whole raft of other unpleasant symptoms.

--Mark

Too little causes havoc also.

You know, UR -- get a good physical to make sure you're healthy.

You're a lot of fun here and I'm sad you're not feeling your best.

Blrfl
11-02-2009, 08:00 AM
Too little causes havoc also.

Yeah, but a different flavor. Been on both sides of that bridge.

--Mark

ukuleG
11-02-2009, 11:57 AM
i have problems with anxiety and depression I'm on meds for it at the moment but things have got a lot worse recently as I'm jobless and my girlfriend of 2 and a half years has left me :(. can't even be bothered to pick up my uke which i normally do daily.

CountryMouse
11-02-2009, 12:07 PM
i have problems with anxiety and depression I'm on meds for it at the moment but things have got a lot worse recently as I'm jobless and my girlfriend of 2 and a half years has left me :(. can't even be bothered to pick up my uke which i normally do daily.

Eep. Sometimes doing music can help. Even just pick it up and strum a few chords, see if it takes you anywhere. :)

::hugs::

CountryMouse

Blrfl
11-02-2009, 12:36 PM
... I'm jobless and my girlfriend of 2 and a half years has left me :(. can't even be bothered to pick up my uke which i normally do daily.

Pick up your uke and write a song about it, man! With lots of minors! :music:

--Mark

UkuLeLesReggAe
11-02-2009, 01:00 PM
Sorry to hear you're having this problem - best of luck to you.

I have to say, I found this remark interesting:



To me that was a surprising observation, because you historically seem very comfortable sharing some pretty intimate stuff about yourself in this forum, which currently is made up of nearly 14,000 members, the vast majority of whom must be complete strangers to you. Yet you're apparently uncomfortable sharing your feelings with the real live human beings you have more direct access to. Perhaps the anonymity of online communication makes you feel safer?

It might be interesting to discuss this unusual split set of comfort levels with a doctor or therapist. I've definitely seen people who show a markedly different personality online than they do in person, but who aren't aware of the difference, even though it's obvious to people who know them well. I wonder if that's happening to you as well?

Anyway, good luck, and hang in there.

You're right :) I can openly say anything and everything over the internet. I don't know any of you in person, which makes it even easier because I don't know what you think of me, I only look at what you type. I have low trust in people, which is why internet is the best place :p

UkuLeLesReggAe
11-02-2009, 01:03 PM
i have problems with anxiety and depression I'm on meds for it at the moment but things have got a lot worse recently as I'm jobless and my girlfriend of 2 and a half years has left me :(. can't even be bothered to pick up my uke which i normally do daily.

oooh , sorry to hear :( to me, medication makes me even worse.... hmmm, it can only get better form here on.

UkuLeLesReggAe
11-02-2009, 01:55 PM
Well, I went to the gp. Because I had like a spasm on Saturday, it could have been a muscle spasm, or just bad anxiety. I can go on a 24hour holt, but she said that by checking my heart and lungs several times, by different doctors, its safe to say that it isn't a heart problem. and because of my exams, I have had nothing to distract me from it because I have so much time to myself and such. I dunno, guess i'll see how it goes.

UkuLeLesReggAe
11-02-2009, 10:25 PM
advertising?

buddhuu
11-03-2009, 12:38 AM
Spam aside (reported)...

There are obviously more of us basket cases around people realise... :D

Sorry to hear of your ordeal, Matt.

I'm 49 and have suffered anxiety and panic attacks since I was in my teens. At various times, mine has manifested in the form of episodes of sheer, blinding panic, hypochondria, depression, hyperventilation, palpitations...

It's a world of fun, isn't it? :D

Although nothing has cured it, I generally have it manageable most of the time. It's made life difficult at times, but I've come to realise that many, if not most, people get at least a hint of it from time to time. That realisation that more other people than I knew do share the experience was a source of some comfort to me. It's not schadenfreude, I'm not happy that other people suffer, but there is reassurance in knowing that one is not alone.

I'd go so far as to say that fear is an ongoing, significant part of my life. In some ways it has probably done a lot to shape who I am.

Although I'd give a lot to be free of it, I'm sort of glad I have the experience as it has helped me to help my youngest daughter and my step-daughter who have both suffered panic attacks too. My other kids have, thankfully, been spared the ordeal. I always went to great pains to conceal my own attacks for fear of alarming the kids. It's only in the last half-dozen years that they've really known about the issues I have.

I wish I'd sought help beyond the anti-depressants I used to get from my doctor, but I've pretty much just got on with it and learned to cope myself.

I would totally recommend that you overrule your trust issues and get some real help. My daughters both benefited hugely from the help of some terrific professionals. You don't need to suffer as much as you do. There is some great assistance available, but I was too stupid to seek it out for my own case.

Talking to others with the same or similar problems is certainly a reassuring thing. Respect to our brothers and sisters who have already shared their experiences in this thread. It wouldn't surprise me if those simple contributions of shared experience help a little. We have a great family here at UU.

Keep us up to date, mate. PM or something if you ever want to talk off-board.

UkuLeLesReggAe
11-03-2009, 01:52 AM
I don't get it though. From Saturday, I haven't been able to breathe properly, and its really worrying me, I don't want to not be able to breath. Until Saturday, I was fine with the problem, not a worry about it! But it's screwed me over since Saturday, feels like I am going to die constantly ever minute of the day I am awake. FFS! I never get medical problems, but when I do... They are insane!

spazus_maximus
11-03-2009, 01:57 AM
Woosh Man! Hope you get to feeling better.


....An Allman brothers line comes to mind...."Leave your mind alone......"

buddhuu
11-03-2009, 02:26 AM
I don't get it though. From Saturday, I haven't been able to breathe properly, and its really worrying me, I don't want to not be able to breath. Until Saturday, I was fine with the problem, not a worry about it! But it's screwed me over since Saturday, feels like I am going to die constantly ever minute of the day I am awake. FFS! I never get medical problems, but when I do... They are insane!

Mate, I'm totally familiar with that.

The first time I ever had a panic attack, in fact the episode that heralded my whole dratted career in anxiety, was at a Bad Company gig at Earl's Court in London in the late 70s.

Suddenly I felt claustrophobic and as if I couldn't breathe. I felt as if my throat was tightening and clogging up. My mates got me to a hospital where they calmed me down, and they arranged for the police of all people to take this panic-striken 17 year-old kid 30 miles home. I went to my quack the following day. He was a loser who just gave me librium and valium for 6 months.

That can't-breathe thing has struck me many times since then - sometimes it feels as if there is no physical constriction, but somehow I don't feel as if I can breathe deeply enough... like the air is somehow not getting in there.

Every time it has been an effect caused by the anxiety, even when it felt as if I was going to die. When the rough period passed, sometimes after a few days, I was back to normal and I could look back and say "Oh, yeah - it really was just the panic attack that did it!" But at the time I just didn't believe it. I was going to die, man!

So, I've been getting that for 30+ years (although not often now I've got a bit of a grip!), and it hasn't killed me yet. You ain't going to die, mate.

BTW, I also have asthma, which can get triggered by the anxiety! As I said, loads of fun! :D

As for the fear of dying, man, I've lost count of the number of miserable nights I had lying awake in terror after being struck by a sudden attack of acute mortality awareness.

Jayzus, this all sounds so melodramatic. Don't get me wrong: this stuff is a pain in the arse, but life is still great and I'm very happy.

The anxiety makes us feel like we're going to die, it may even convince us that we're going to die. It makes us afraid.

But we DON'T die! So we win!

Ha! In your face, panic attack!

sukie
11-03-2009, 02:41 AM
How goes the day so far, UR?

hoosierhiver
11-03-2009, 03:10 AM
Some people find guided relaxation tapes helpful.

UkuLeLesReggAe
11-03-2009, 03:16 AM
Mate, I'm totally familiar with that.

The first time I ever had a panic attack, in fact the episode that heralded my whole dratted career in anxiety, was at a Bad Company gig at Earl's Court in London in the late 70s.

Suddenly I felt claustrophobic and as if I couldn't breathe. I felt as if my throat was tightening and clogging up. My mates got me to a hospital where they calmed me down, and they arranged for the police of all people to take this panic-striken 17 year-old kid 30 miles home. I went to my quack the following day. He was a loser who just gave me librium and valium for 6 months.

That can't-breathe thing has struck me many times since then - sometimes it feels as if there is no physical constriction, but somehow I don't feel as if I can breathe deeply enough... like the air is somehow not getting in there.

Every time it has been an effect caused by the anxiety, even when it felt as if I was going to die. When the rough period passed, sometimes after a few days, I was back to normal and I could look back and say "Oh, yeah - it really was just the panic attack that did it!" But at the time I just didn't believe it. I was going to die, man!

So, I've been getting that for 30+ years (although not often now I've got a bit of a grip!), and it hasn't killed me yet. You ain't going to die, mate.

BTW, I also have asthma, which can get triggered by the anxiety! As I said, loads of fun! :D

As for the fear of dying, man, I've lost count of the number of miserable nights I had lying awake in terror after being struck by a sudden attack of acute mortality awareness.

Jayzus, this all sounds so melodramatic. Don't get me wrong: this stuff is a pain in the arse, but life is still great and I'm very happy.

The anxiety makes us feel like we're going to die, it may even convince us that we're going to die. It makes us afraid.

But we DON'T die! So we win!

Ha! In your face, panic attack!

Ha ha ha ha ha ha love that!! that's perfect!! So I'm guessing it was a panic attack. And it has eased... so we'll see how it goes, even though I'm in the middle of the most important part of my life so far, I still rather talk to the comforting people of UU than study.

Ha ha, can I ask you, how many times do you get these attacks? Because (guessing) I have probably had this for 1 year (now that I think about it, but, guessing) and it has only happened once.

UkuLeLesReggAe
11-03-2009, 03:20 AM
How goes the day so far, UR?

Its 1:16 at night, but I am having a great conversation with my friend, Cortney. Each day the pain gets better, so I'm hopeing tomorrow morning is EVEN better. And I honestly couldn't feel better with the way this thread has gone (I'm gullable, if you tell me to eat these pens infront of me to make the pain go away, I will start eating them) because even though it's internet and anybody can say anything, I trust everything everyone says and it has made me feel so much better!! :D :D :D

to sum up how greatful I am - <3 =D

still, thanking everybody for the great advice. THANKS!! :)

how are you sukie? Call me Matt if you like, I don't mind.

Melissa82
11-03-2009, 03:26 AM
I had anxiety for awhile. I had the mini panic attacks, heart palpitations and that kinda stuff, especially when I drank or ate caffeine so I stopped that. I went to the doc and he put me on a low dose of anti-depressant meds which were for anxiety. Turns out they made me worse. I got really depressed to the point I started thinking about ways to kill myself. After that, I realized the meds were no good for me, weaned myself off of them with the help of my doc prescribing lower dosages and saw a counselor. I'm happy to say I've never felt better for the last year or so now after struggling for over 10 years.

Talking to someone who is trained to deal with anxiety and life problems REALLY helps and also getting out of situations that cause high amounts of stress (I had lots of family issues).

Rzr
11-03-2009, 03:28 AM
Sorry to hear about this. Hang in there. The only thing I can think of is to write down all your questions as they come to you. That way when at the Doctor's you'll have your thoughts organized and won't have to worry about not asking everything you wanted to.

ukuleG
11-03-2009, 03:55 AM
theres something wrong with people these days i know about 5 other close friends on tablets for similar reasons. My dad and his brother have had several problems when it comes to depression and other mental illness going in and out of different types of hospitals etc as had their father. i guess the crazy torch has been passed down to me.

buddhuu
11-03-2009, 03:56 AM
Ha ha ha ha ha ha love that!! that's perfect!! So I'm guessing it was a panic attack. And it has eased... so we'll see how it goes, even though I'm in the middle of the most important part of my life so far, I still rather talk to the comforting people of UU than study.

Ha ha, can I ask you, how many times do you get these attacks? Because (guessing) I have probably had this for 1 year (now that I think about it, but, guessing) and it has only happened once.

First, I just want to emphasise a point. As I said, I never sought further pro help after being let down by a prescription-happy idiot GP. Don't think that you're going to have the same experience as me. People I know who have anxiety attacks (including my daughters) who have sought pro help have found it really does help spectacularly well.

Anyway, I used to get attacks really often. When it first started, when I was in my teens, I was really scared. I hardly dared lie down to sleep. For a week or so, my mum had to sit with me until I fell asleep.

Things got a bit better after that.

It seems to come in phases. These days I can have months where I go with no significant panic episodes (although my usual hypochondria tends to lurk in the wings). Attacks that leave me with that can't-breathe feeling are now very rare, because I think I have accepted what is causing it. What tends to hit me most - maybe a couple times a month - is that acute mortality awareness thing. That hits me almost without warning - usually at night - with like a premonition of mortality.

A kind of profound realisation that one day my number will be up and that I'll have to go through the moment for real, and there's no way out.

The thing is, I've learned that that is very common amongst people who don't otherwise suffer from anxiety. I think the difference is that we who do have the extra anxiety/panic issues are a little more vulnerable, so get hit maybe a little more often and a little harder.

But again, even though my progress has been DIY, I have found ways to manage it, and things are heaps better than they used to be.

I think I am aware of little things constantly - every day - that I know are little tweaks from my anxiety. Mild anxiety attacks may happen a couple of times a week, with full-on panics a couple of times a month. But these episodes are brief. I've learned to get out the other side pretty quickly. A mega panic is now a 5 minute thing, whereas it could last for a day or two when I was 17 or 18.

I can't stress enough that you should ask to see a specialist therapist or counselor. I hear nothing but good about them. DIY is a bumpy and unnecessary road.

Rzr
11-03-2009, 04:10 AM
The mortality issue has been with me for as long as I remember. I don't ever talk about it because then I think about. I remember not being able to sleep as a child because I was to freaked out about it. Nothing I could think about would make it go away. It still comes once and a while, but not to often, and I seem to be able to shake it off now. Like I said I don't talk about this, I'm suprised I wrote what I did, so I won't say anymore. Happy thoughts.:)

CountryMouse
11-03-2009, 04:25 AM
theres something wrong with people these days i know about 5 other close friends on tablets for similar reasons. My dad and his brother have had several problems when it comes to depression and other mental illness going in and out of different types of hospitals etc as had their father. i guess the crazy torch has been passed down to me.

I think people just talk a little more about it nowadays, what with such a stigma to it in the past. I've had problems with anxiety and panic disorder since 1968.

It's still my knee-jerk reaction NOT to talk about it, to hide it, thinking, "If only people knew, they would shun me for sure!".

I don't know about others, but I tend to not use the "crazy" term. We're sane, just afflicted.

CountryMouse

buddhuu
11-03-2009, 04:25 AM
The mortality issue has been with me for as long as I remember. I don't ever talk about it because then I think about. I remember not being able to sleep as a child because I was to freaked out about it. Nothing I could think about would make it go away. It still comes once and a while, but not to often, and I seem to be able to shake it off now. Like I said I don't talk about this, I'm suprised I wrote what I did, so I won't say anymore. Happy thoughts.:)

Good on you.

Thanks for illustrating the point about how it's much more common than we may realise. We each feel very alone when it hits, but truth is we're in it together whether we know it or not.

Back to the happy thoughts! :)

buddhuu
11-03-2009, 04:27 AM
[...]We're sane, just afflicted.

I think that's true of the rest of you... but I'm crazy. :D

hoosierhiver
11-03-2009, 04:35 AM
This is interesting,
http://www.myasha.org/node/12

CountryMouse
11-03-2009, 04:36 AM
Re: the mortality issue: I think besides the usual "catastrophic thinking" that anxiety folks are prone to, there are other reasons I've been aware of mortality for almost all my life:

My brother killed himself when he was 18, I was 13, my sister was only 5. So being a survivor-of-suicide makes you wonder..."am I gonna do it? am I gonna die?" Years and years later I found out my sister and I both had had those thoughts when we were younger.

The other thing that always keeps me looking over my shoulder now is that I had cancer back in 2001/2002. Okay, you're never cancer-free--just NED (no evidence of disease--I prefer the couponing "No Expiration Date" har har!). But it's hard for a cancer survivor not to think every little twinge might be a symptom.

So being a person with anxiety kinda heightens things. You just have to be aware that that's all part of the mix and see a doctor if you think it's really something, not to worry if it's not. For me: I get my checkups regularly. So if my surgeon says, "You're fine!", I trust her. :)

CountryMouse

CountryMouse
11-03-2009, 04:38 AM
I think that's true of the rest of you... but I'm crazy. :D

Okay, you loony nut-job! :p :D

::runnnnnnnning!!!!::

CountryMouse

UkuLeLesReggAe
11-03-2009, 03:27 PM
I think that's true of the rest of you... but I'm crazy. :D

yeah I agree, I'm crazy also :P

UkuLeLesReggAe
11-03-2009, 03:30 PM
This is interesting,
http://www.myasha.org/node/12

- According to the World Health Organization almost 3,000 people commit suicide every day in the world.

ooooh...gee didn't know that, that's a lot of people. But when ou think about it. Every second of the day, you have a 1 in 6billion chance of dieing every second. SCAREY!

today it is a lot better, still a bit tense ( day 4, omfg. ) but getting there.

buddhuu
11-04-2009, 12:53 AM
Glad you're feeling a bit better, Matt. :)

Don't get yourself too immersed in other people's problems that are different to yours. The suicide thing... I know it crops up on sites that deal with mental health issues, but screw that. It's not a helpful thing to read about. Not happy, not reassuring.

I think the web is a great resource, but for people with anxiety that might include an element of anxiety about health it can be a big mistake to surf for answers rather than seek help from pros.

It's like the fella in Jerone K Jerome's "Three Men in a Boat". He read a medical dictionary, and by the time he'd finished he was convinced that he had every ailment listed... except housemaid's knee. The web can be like that.

Don't dwell on anxiety and depression issues generally. Put your time to better use. Take your mind off your probs and if you need to take action to help you through the rough patches, then go to the experts.

Hope it keeps improving for you, mate.

Rzr
11-04-2009, 01:46 AM
Funny, but true , story here. I'm a stay at home dad for about 3 and a half years now. About 2 years ago I was doing some dry wall in my house while the wife and kids were away for the weekend. After crawling around cutting drywall and stuff I noticed my knee was about the size of a grapefruit. It didn't really hurt but I went to the doctor anyways because, well, it was gross. Turns out I had housemaid's knee. Not a big deal, it went away, but very ironic.:)

hoosierhiver
11-04-2009, 02:42 AM
I think my last post was taken differently than what I meant. I posted the link to show that a very high percentage of people have problems, alot of people think they are alone in this.

RevWill
11-04-2009, 04:08 AM
I strongly recommend seeking a therapist with training in Cognitive-Behavior therapy. (I was a therapist for 10 years). You can greatly augment therapy with reading books like this one (http://www.amazon.com/Control-Your-Anxiety-Before-Controls/dp/0806521368).

The advice given here has been good, even excellent. Meditation and intentional relaxation can help tremendously. Cutting back on stimulants or giving them up completely may help.

Make a list of things to discuss with your healthcare providers. Having a list or an agenda can help your doctor and therapist make informed decisions, and most tend to appreciate it.

Be honest with your doc about everything: caffeine, nicotine, diet, exercise, alcohol, other things.

Keep a journal. What was going on just before your panic attack? What were the thoughts running through your head during the attack? What were you thinking and doing when it began to subside?

Talking therapy has been shown as effective as medication for anxiety. Too many of the drugs prescribed for anxiety have addictive properties anyway, and the short term benefits may not outweigh the potential for long-term problems. Again, Cognitive-Behavior therapy has been shown especially effective for anxiety.

buddhuu
11-04-2009, 10:53 PM
I think my last post was taken differently than what I meant. I posted the link to show that a very high percentage of people have problems, alot of people think they are alone in this.

Didn't mean to diss your post, Mike; it was relevant info. I was just pointing out to Matt that thinking too much about certain details may not cheer him up. ;)