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Uke-lahoma
11-03-2009, 08:37 AM
During the Marshall University football game this weekend, I saw a promotional spot featuring a ukulele playing student, Juston Donadieu. It turns out that there are several different endings to the commercial, and I've now seen four: beatbox music (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kvn5BdshXss&feature=related), Matthew McConaughey (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2OLBXOCKEqg), cheerleaders (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P2i4EO4aUek&feature=related), and a football player (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tByiQLWQ1CI&feature=related).

mds725
11-03-2009, 09:19 AM
Slightly off the topic (which I assume is the use of a ukulele in an advertisement), but this should not go unnoticed. It's actually a little embarrassing for Marshall University to be using bad grammar in a commercial about an educational institution. The ukulele player says "Coming from six hours away, Marshall University has been a home away from home for me." The structure of this sentence requires the phrase "coming from six hours away" to modify the subject of the sentence, which is "Marshall University." So the guy is saying that Marshall University came from six hours away, which is, of course, physically impossible. What he should have said to be grammatically correct is "Coming from six hours away, I've found that Marshall University is a home away from home for me." This way, the phrase modifies him ("I" being the subject of this sentence), as it is intended to. This is a common grammatical error (it's called a misplaced modifier), but it's inexcusable when educational institutions make these errors.

UKISOCIETY
11-03-2009, 09:20 AM
Slightly off the topic (which I assume is the use of a ukulele in an advertisement), but this should not go unnoticed. It's actually a little embarrassing for Marshall University to be using bad grammar in a commercial about an educational institution. The ukulele player says "Coming from six hours away, Marshall University has been a home away from home for me." The structure of this sentence requires the phrase "coming from six hours away" to modify the subject of the sentence, which is "Marshall University." So the guy is saying that Marshall University came from six hours away, which is, of course, physically impossible. What he should have said to be grammatically correct is "Coming from six hours away, I've found that Marshall Univeristy is a home away from home for me." This way, the phrase modifies him ("I" being the subject of this sentence), as it is intended to. This is a common grammatical error (it's called a misplaced modifier), but it's inexcusable when edicational institutions make these errors.

I thought the same thing, but I wasn't going to say anything...;)

WhenDogsSing
11-03-2009, 10:03 AM
Slightly off the topic (which I assume is the use of a ukulele in an advertisement), but this should not go unnoticed. It's actually a little embarrassing for Marshall University to be using bad grammar in a commercial about an educational institution. The ukulele player says "Coming from six hours away, Marshall University has been a home away from home for me." The structure of this sentence requires the phrase "coming from six hours away" to modify the subject of the sentence, which is "Marshall University." So the guy is saying that Marshall University came from six hours away, which is, of course, physically impossible. What he should have said to be grammatically correct is "Coming from six hours away, I've found that Marshall Univeristy is a home away from home for me." This way, the phrase modifies him ("I" being the subject of this sentence), as it is intended to. This is a common grammatical error (it's called a misplaced modifier), but it's inexcusable when edicational institutions make these errors.

" Univeristy"..."edicational"...:eek:

mds725
11-03-2009, 10:32 AM
" Univeristy"..."edicational"...:eek:

Lol. I'm lost these days without spellcheck.

DeG
11-03-2009, 11:16 AM
+1 to Mds725. I love word nerds!:)

haolejohn
11-03-2009, 11:22 AM
Slightly off the topic (which I assume is the use of a ukulele in an advertisement), but this should not go unnoticed. It's actually a little embarrassing for Marshall University to be using bad grammar in a commercial about an educational institution. The ukulele player says "Coming from six hours away, Marshall University has been a home away from home for me." The structure of this sentence requires the phrase "coming from six hours away" to modify the subject of the sentence, which is "Marshall University." So the guy is saying that Marshall University came from six hours away, which is, of course, physically impossible. What he should have said to be grammatically correct is "Coming from six hours away, I've found that Marshall University is a home away from home for me." This way, the phrase modifies him ("I" being the subject of this sentence), as it is intended to. This is a common grammatical error (it's called a misplaced modifier), but it's inexcusable when educational institutions make these errors.

I teach grammar (sometimes) and I find nothing wrong with that statement. Your correct but a small grammar mistake don't make the university look bad. The University used an ukulele in an ad. +rep points for Marshall.

DeG
11-03-2009, 11:31 AM
I teach grammar (sometimes) and I find nothing wrong with that statement. Your correct but a small grammar mistake don't make the university look bad. The University used an ukulele in an ad. +rep points for Marshall.

ROTF and out the door!!
:rofl:

haolejohn
11-03-2009, 11:33 AM
ROTF and out the door!!
:rofl:

As many times as you have made me laugh i figured I'd try to get you to laugh.

haolejohn
11-03-2009, 11:34 AM
I teach grammar (sometimes) and I find nothing wrong with that statement. Your correct but a small grammar mistake don't make the university look bad. The University used an ukulele in an ad. +rep points for Marshall.

I forgot to put a , before and which would have been the proper way to write that compound sentence but I really hate grammar.

haolejohn
11-03-2009, 11:35 AM
ROTF and out the door!!
:rofl:

You didn't catch the other obvious one did you?

mds725
11-03-2009, 11:44 AM
I teach grammar (sometimes) and I find nothing wrong with that statement. Your correct but a small grammar mistake don't make the university look bad. The University used an ukulele in an ad. +rep points for Marshall.

Funny, haloejohn! I found the other one.

Your = belonging to you
You are = You're


Meanwhile, it wasn't my intention to hijack this thread. I agree with haloejohn that it's great that Marshall used an ukulele in its ads, and the ads are clever, so big props to Marshall. I did have a few nits: First, the ads use the ukulele as a shortcut for telling us that the guy playing it came from Hawai'i (6 hours away from Eastern Time), which sort of belies how poppular the ukulele has become everywhere else. In addition, I'm not keen on the ad in which cheerleaders pour water on the guy, as it conveys the impression that they think he's a nerd, that the ukulele misuc annoys them, and that they're trying to get him to stop playing. (If Marshall was going for one of those end-of-the-game Gatorade shower things, it should have used "teammates" of the guy (in this case, other uke players?) instead of cheerleaders, who don't do the Gatorade pouring at actual sporting events.)

haolejohn
11-03-2009, 11:47 AM
Your = belonging to you
You are = You're.
I'm just sayin'.

Meanwhile, it wasn't my intention to hijack this thread. I agree with haloejohn that it's great that Marshall used an ukulele in its ads, and the ads are clever, so big props to Marshall. I did have a few nits: First, the ads use the ukulele as a shortcut for telling us that the guy playing it came from Hawai'i (6 hours away from Eastern Time), which sort of belies how poppular the ukulele has become everywhere else. In addition, I'm not keen on the ad in which cheerleaders pour water on the guy, as it conveys the impression that they think he's a nerd, that the ukulele misuc annoys them, and that they're trying to get him to stop playing. (If Marshall was going for one of those end-of-the-game Gatorade shower things, it should have used "teammates" of the guy (in this case, other uke players?) instead of cheerleaders, who don't do the Gatorade pouring at actual sporting events.)

LOL!! You got it. Your:)

I haven't seen the video or commercial yet. Maybe the cheerleaders pouring water on the guy is supposed to be an innuendo????

DeG
11-03-2009, 04:06 PM
I didn't catch it...I must be slipping:) Truth be told, I often catch myself using "your" when I should use "you're". If you see a post of mine and it says (edited) down in the corner. That is the #1 reason why:)

haolejohn
11-03-2009, 05:12 PM
I didn't catch it...I must be slipping:) Truth be told, I often catch myself using "your" when I should use "you're". If you see a post of mine and it says (edited) down in the corner. That is the #1 reason why:)

When I was student teaching my grammar was so weak. I spoke in quadtrupal negatives. I'm from the country ya know. Anyways, the last subject I took over was grammar. It is amazing how far I have come along. I still speak country but in front of the classroom it is proper english with a twang.

CoLmes
11-03-2009, 05:46 PM
We's Need No Edumakation

haolejohn
11-04-2009, 05:35 AM
We's Need No Edumakation

My self and two other teachers are going to cover the Pink Floyd song in our teacher Follies because the song actually has a good meaning when one takes the grammatical errors into consideration.