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cornfedgroove
11-08-2009, 04:24 AM
I started making my own bridges, and its so far so good. My question is that I'd been practicing on red oak, and decided to start making some out of red oak for builds. I know, from you guys, that red oak is an old school tonewood but I also know that its not as dense as rosewood etc. It seems that its not "optimal", but what do you guys think.

Sven
11-08-2009, 04:42 AM
I'd say hardness is at least as important as density. I made a bridge of walnut that seemed great until the strings started to eat their way into the wood. I use string through method, so the strings come up from small holes, and in the case of the walnut the holes got grooves cut in the direction of the saddle.

Don't you hate it when it takes one hundred words to not describe a very very simple thing... English is not my first language.

I think oak will work just fine.

ATB / Sven

RonS
11-08-2009, 05:31 AM
FWIW

I have a 37 year old Ovation with a walnut bridge (original owner) and it is still in great shape.
BTW this guitar has had the frets replaced 3 times because of wear.

I have seen bridges on ukes made from mahogany. (softer than oak)

Correct me if I'm wrong
I beleive it is white oak and not read oak that is considered a decent tonewood.

Bottom Line: Give it a try and let us know how it worked out.

nohandles
11-08-2009, 05:35 AM
I've been using Corian counter top material for a while now with some very good results. I even tried one on my electric upright bass. It worked very well and really helped the pick up

Darrel
11-08-2009, 06:50 AM
I've been using Corian counter top material for a while now with some very good results. I even tried one on my electric upright bass. It worked very well and really helped the pick up

I use Corian for nut's and saddles, never considered it as a bridge material though.

-darrel

Matt Clara
11-08-2009, 08:51 AM
That guy with the web page on mandolin bridges really liked hard maple, why not try some of that? If you've got a broken shovel handle, you've likely got some hard maple right there...

RonS
11-08-2009, 08:53 AM
If you've got a broken shovel handle, you've likely got some hard maple right there...


Most likely the handle will be hickory

cornfedgroove
11-08-2009, 09:17 AM
hmm...I've only ever used it one one build, and that was the nylon strung cigar box dulcimer. It sounds good, but the volume is low, but honestly I think the box and string types the largest factors there.

The mandolin will be the test. I'm actually hoping for a bright, yet mellowy warm sound out of it. It probably wont be anywhere close LOL...

live and learn.

I'll post pics later on both threads...right now I'm stuck waiting on tuner bushings and set screws that got misplaced. Dang things cost me more than the tuners themself.

Matt Clara
11-08-2009, 10:09 AM
Most likely the handle will be hickory

In my experience, which admittedly is less than yours, axe / hammer handles are hickory where shovel handles are maple and ash. I would think hickory would be considered too heavy and dense for a shovel handle.