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View Full Version : A good use for laser jet transfers



Matt Clara
11-09-2009, 10:43 AM
I was trying to figure out how to get my headstock designs on my headstock blanks so I could rough them out on the band saw. My wife has an old brother laser jet we bought new about 9 years ago. I printed my design outlines onto regular old paper, cut them out and taped them onto the back of my headstock, and then ironed them on medium-high heat, burnishing them heavily and lifting a corner here and there to see how I was doing. Worked great.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
11-09-2009, 11:08 AM
Boy, you are really trying to make this all harder than it needs to be.
Try a pencil and a plexi template.
I have a builder friend who admits: If there's a harder or slower way of doing things I'll find it."

Matt Clara
11-09-2009, 12:56 PM
Boy, you are really trying to make this all harder than it needs to be.
Try a pencil and a plexi template.
I have a builder friend who admits: If there's a harder or slower way of doing things I'll find it."

Thanks Chuck, I'll look into it. In defense of my approach: It wasn't hard, I had the materials at hand, and it worked well. I'd say that's downright innovative for a guy who hasn't made squat in a shop since 8th grade shop class.

dave g
11-09-2009, 04:05 PM
Thanks Chuck, I'll look into it. In defense of my approach: It wasn't hard, I had the materials at hand, and it worked well. I'd say that's downright innovative for a guy who hasn't made squat in a shop since 8th grade shop class.

I think your approach was excellent! I do the same thing for 1 or 2 off stuff; print on paper, glue it on, cut it out, sand the paper off. Works great.

DaveVisi
11-09-2009, 04:14 PM
Most toners are susceptable to several kinds of solvents. As long as you find one that doesn't damage the finish on your instrument, you can "wet" the paper with solvent and the toner comes off the paper and onto whatever's underneath.

I discovered this when I spilled some nail polish remover on some papers on my desk. Now my desk has a permanent imprint of the writing on it.

Sometimes it's not a perfectly solid transfer so I touch it up with a Sharpie marker.

I used this transfer method to make templates for scrimshaw. I just transferred the image and scribed the lines.

RonS
11-09-2009, 04:35 PM
Most toners are susceptable to several kinds of solvents.

Such as xylene and acetone (aka nail polish remover).

DaveVisi
11-16-2009, 08:19 PM
Such as xylene and acetone (aka nail polish remover).

Exactly. It was a nail polish spill that led me to this discovery. Straight Acetone works better but is more toxic. I soak the paper with something like a cotton ball, but not long enough that the toner runs. Just long enough for it to soften and cling to the object. Just before the acetone evaporates completely I can lift the paper and leave the toner residue behind.

Matt Clara
11-17-2009, 01:59 AM
Exactly. It was a nail polish spill that led me to this discovery. Straight Acetone works better but is more toxic. I soak the paper with something like a cotton ball, but not long enough that the toner runs. Just long enough for it to soften and cling to the object. Just before the acetone evaporates completely I can lift the paper and leave the toner residue behind.

Unfortunately, I tried it with color toner and it didn't do a dang thing.