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kissing
11-10-2009, 08:37 PM
The heat has hit the dormitory where I live (Australia), and I have no air conditioning.

So the temperature is around 35 to 40 degrees Celsius in my room :eek:

Is this bad for ukes?
It bothers me when the ukes feel warm and feverish.

They're all laminate ukes (and a solidbody eleuke), so they're supposed to be resillient. But can they be damaged with this heat?

cocohonk
11-10-2009, 10:42 PM
Wow, how do you stand the heat yourself, let alone ukes? :D

I'm not sure, the only thing I keep hearing is never leave your uke in a car trunk.Though, the biggest concern on temperature seems to be more about sudden changes in temperature rather than a higher than optimal temperature (around 70s fahrenheit?).

kissing
11-10-2009, 11:01 PM
Hmm well I just moved them to my friend's airconditioned room.

I swear, I treat my ukes better than I treat myself xD

ukantor
11-10-2009, 11:04 PM
I keep a laminate uke in my car, and on two occasions it has got so hot that the strings (Aquilas) were ruined. The uke survived.

I've since discovered that the strings can recover. The last time it happened, I wound the tension off them, and left them to cool down and relax for a day or so. When I brought them back up to tune, they sounded OK.

I'm a big fan of laminate ukes, for use in challenging conditions. They are tough and forgiving.

Ukantor.

kissing
11-10-2009, 11:06 PM
Thats the same reason I like laminate ukes too.

You ruined your strings with heat?
How hot was it for that to happen?

keithy351
11-11-2009, 12:39 PM
hey bro, im in aus, ive got a kanilea solid wood so i have got alot of worries and the temp where i was the other day was 36... so heres what i have been told, dont have the uke in direct sunlight for long times ie if your gonna go play outside, sit in the shade, reason being is it can loosen the glue and can make it come apart, laminate is very strong, so it wont crack or warp... its not so much heat you should be worried about, but rather humidity, so even though the heat outiside maybe high and himidity fair high outside, inside your house it would be only around 50-60% so you got no worries. laminate are pretty indistructable, i dont think you have got a reason to worry mate.

nohandles
11-11-2009, 01:07 PM
I've been playing for over 30 years now. My first real instrument was an Alverez Jumbo guitar June 4th 1975, that being said I wasn't the kindest to my instruments in the beginning. I would leave it in the trunk in the summer and winter and it is still as nice as the day I got it. In fact today I will take my upright bass out in the morning at the fall festivals and leave it out until I finish playing sometime experiencing temperature changes from the 60's down to the low 30's in the early morning when I finally pack up. My belief is that instruments aren't as delicate as we think. just a little common since will keep them intact. Going from hot to cold or vise versa, let then acclimate to the change in temperature before taking them out of the case- 45 minutes to an hour. It has served me well over the years. However I do feel they need to have proper humidity whether in air conditioning or not winter and summer.

ukantor
11-11-2009, 01:24 PM
Hi Kissing,

How hot? I can't tell you in degrees, but you know how hot a car can get on a summer's day, when left in direct sunlight? You open the door, and reel back from the hot air gushing out. You can't touch the steering wheel, until it has had a chance to cool down.

Twice I've picked up my uke in the car and found the strings had stretched so much that they just flopped around making a pathetic soft twanging noise.

Lesson learned - I avoided it this summer.

Ukantor.

mailman
11-11-2009, 02:22 PM
[QUOTE=nohandles;250587 My belief is that instruments aren't as delicate as we think. just a little common since will keep them intact. Going from hot to cold or vise versa, let then acclimate to the change in temperature before taking them out of the case- 45 minutes to an hour. It has served me well over the years. However I do feel they need to have proper humidity whether in air conditioning or not winter and summer.[/QUOTE]

:agree::agree: Watch the extremes and the rapid changes....

Rick Turner
11-11-2009, 05:16 PM
Many of the types of glue used in ukes let go at about 140 F or 60 C. They soften before they hit that point, though, so watch out for that heat in a closed car. It's like a sauna.