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tylerk
11-24-2009, 03:14 PM
i would like to know

JT_Ukes
11-24-2009, 03:46 PM
the ukulele, like a piano is not in a key. It can play songs in any key.

Instruments with limited notes, like the harmonica, are made to play in a certain key. Instruments that can play all notes are not.

tylerk
11-24-2009, 05:14 PM
then how would i take a guitar part ang change it to uku

RevWill
11-24-2009, 05:53 PM
The uku is similar to the 4 high strings on a guitar capoed on the 5th fret.

Lanark
11-25-2009, 01:16 AM
Here's a link to a page with a diagram of all the notes on the Ukulele Fretboard (http://www.ukulelestrummers.com/Ukefretboard.html)

If there's something specific you're working on and you get a bit stuck the "Song Help" tab is the place to post. Somebody can usually put you on the right path.

ichadwick
11-25-2009, 01:28 AM
Well, like a guitar, the uke has a root. It's not a key per se, but with the strings GCEA, it is almost a C chord (it's an Am7 actually). Like a guitar's root is E.

spots
11-25-2009, 05:00 AM
The uke can be set to different "tunings" depending how how you tune the strings. Different tunings will require different chord patterns.

Hold the uke in the playing position. The string closest to your chin is the 4th string. The string closest to the floor is the first string. When people mention string names they go from chin to floor, or 4,3,2,1.

For example:
The D chord on a uke in "C tuning" will be 2220
(4th string 2nd fret, 3nd string 2nd fret, 2nd string 2nd fret, 1st string open)

The D chord on a uke in "D tuning" will be 0003
(4th string open, 3rd string open, 2nd string open, 1st string 3rd fret)


When the strings are tuned to GCEA, this is refered to as "C Tuning". 4th=G, 3rd=C, 2nd=E, 1st=A

When the strings are tuned to ADF#B, this is refered to as "D Tuning". It is a step higher than C tuning. 4th=A, 3rd=D, 2nd=F#, 1st=B

Within each of those tunings you can play songs in different "keys".

freedive135
11-25-2009, 05:24 AM
then how would i take a guitar part ang change it to uku

If you trying to change the Chord part there is nothing to change other than you finger positions a C chord is a C chord no matter what it is played on.

Now if your asking about single note melodys that is a different story.
If you have the sheet music you can use a note scale and figure it out that way.
If your working from tabs use the Uke fret map Lanark posted and cross reference it to a Guitar fret map but.....

if the notes move to the Low E or A on the guitar strings or even the D that opens a hole new can of worms...

ukecantdothat
11-25-2009, 05:45 AM
Well, like a guitar, the uke has a root. It's not a key per se, but with the strings GCEA, it is almost a C chord (it's an Am7 actually). Like a guitar's root is E.It can also be looked at as a C6 chord, the A being the 6th note of a C major scale - a very pretty way to end a song in the key of C.

Chaser-1
11-25-2009, 06:42 AM
To make the answer simple, the ukulele, like a guitar and piano, is in the key of C. That means when you play a C, it sounds a C. It is not a transposing instrument like a saxophone or clarinet. I play tenor sax as well, and that is in the key of Bb. In other words, on a tenor sax, if I play a C on it, it's actually sounding out a Bb. Does that help?

keithy351
11-25-2009, 10:52 AM
my cats name is whiskers

ukantor
11-25-2009, 11:07 AM
Can't we make these replies a bit more complicated? With just a bit more effort we could confuse the OP totally.

Ukantor.

tylerk
11-27-2009, 08:43 AM
thanks guys that was very helpfull

Lori
11-27-2009, 09:05 AM
To make the answer simple, the ukulele, like a guitar and piano, is in the key of C. That means when you play a C, it sounds a C. It is not a transposing instrument like a saxophone or clarinet. I play tenor sax as well, and that is in the key of Bb. In other words, on a tenor sax, if I play a C on it, it's actually sounding out a Bb. Does that help?

Boy, that one makes my brain hurt! Note to self... don't take up saxophone or clarinet! Thanks for the warning.

–Lori

ukecantdothat
11-27-2009, 09:56 AM
To make the answer simple, the ukulele, like a guitar and piano, is in the key of C. That means when you play a C, it sounds a C. It is not a transposing instrument like a saxophone or clarinet. I play tenor sax as well, and that is in the key of Bb. In other words, on a tenor sax, if I play a C on it, it's actually sounding out a Bb. Does that help?

Boy, that one makes my brain hurt! Note to self... don't take up saxophone or clarinet! Thanks for the warning.

–LoriHorn players. Nothin' but trouble, that lot! What Chaser means is the music written for ukes, guitars, pianos, and other normal instruments is written in the "C clef" which is different from horns, which use the "Y clef", I think... The actual instrument could cover ALL keys, but may have notation written specifically for it. Saxes are laid out such that a tenor is basically in "Bb" and an alto "Eb" but that doesn't mean that you can't play other keys, of course, especially if you're a monster player like a Charlie Parker who wails in any key, even the "impossible" keys.

And we haven't even mentioned capos yet! I love seeing capos on ukes. I've actually been given some s**t for using a capo, but hey, if Sir Paul McBeatley can use one on his Hofner... Right now I only have one uke, so I keep a capo handy at gigs - usually bust it out when there's horn player in the fray!:D